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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Mercedes Villanueva-Flores, Ramon Valle and Mar Bornay-Barrachina

This study examines whether disabled workers perceive negative workplace experiences in terms of discrimination. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of…

2645

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines whether disabled workers perceive negative workplace experiences in terms of discrimination. The purpose of this paper is to study the effects of perceived distributive injustice at work, regarding three dimensions – job assignment, compensation and career development opportunities – on perceived discrimination and explore the mediation role of perceived discrimination in the relationship between perceived distributive injustice and the job dissatisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Research hypotheses are tested with a questionnaire administered to 107 disabled employees working in public and private Spanish organisations.

Findings

The results indicate that physically disabled people perceive distributive injustice and discrimination at work regarding job assignment, compensation and career development opportunities in Andalusian organisations, and this perception of discrimination leads to feel dissatisfaction. This study confirms the triple dimensionality of two of the variables studied: perceived distributive injustice at work and perceived discrimination at work.

Originality/value

Few studies have focussed on disability-related issues from a human resource management viewpoint. This study focusses on job assignments, compensation and career development and shows that the perception of discrimination mediates the relation between the perception of distributive injustice at work, and job dissatisfaction. That is, perceived distributive injustice in the organisation leads physically disabled employees to compare their situation with that of their non-disabled peers and thus to perceive discrimination regarding job assignment, compensation and career development opportunities. As a result, they become dissatisfied with their jobs. The results obtained allow us to extend the organisational justice framework, achieving a more thorough understanding of the perception of both injustice and discrimination.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 June 2020

Mohammad Nisar Khattak, Roxanne Zolin and Noor Muhammad

The main purpose of this study is to examine the catalytic impact of perceptions of politics in organizations on the relationship between perceived unfairness and deviant…

Abstract

Purpose

The main purpose of this study is to examine the catalytic impact of perceptions of politics in organizations on the relationship between perceived unfairness and deviant behavior at work.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the proposed research model, the authors collected field data in a public sector university located in Islamabad Capital Territory, Pakistan. A two-wave questionnaire was distributed to 400 employees. In the first wave, the questionnaire was used to collect data on participants’ perceptions of perceived injustice and organizational politics. After two weeks, the second wave of data collection was conducted by sending another questionnaire to the same respondents to collect data on their organizational and interpersonal deviance.

Findings

Empirical findings revealed that perceived interactional injustice results in interpersonal deviance, and perceived distributive and procedural injustice results in organizational deviance. Moreover, the direct relationship between perceived injustice and deviant behaviors was stronger when the perception of politics factor was high.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is one of the first to test the detrimental effect of perception of politics on deviance in a public organization in Pakistan.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2022

Wei Deng, Ming Jia and Zhe Zhang

This paper aims to investigate the differential moderating effects of two types (internal/external) of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the relationship between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the differential moderating effects of two types (internal/external) of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the relationship between distributive injustice and organization-directed revenge through the mediating role of negative emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper conducts two studies. Study 1 was a vignette study based on a sample of 501 part-time master of business administration students in China aimed at testing the moderating effects of different levels of internal (external) CSR. Study 2 involved a laboratory experiment in which 108 postgraduate students were recruited to scrutinize the contrasting moderating effects of different types of CSR (internal vs external) and test the underlying mechanisms of negative emotions. The latest facial expression analysis technology (FaceReader 5.0 software) was used to detect participants’ emotional state.

Findings

Study 1 demonstrates that internal CSR buffers the relationship between distributive injustice and organizational revenge behavior through negative emotions. However, the moderating effect of external CSR is not significant. Study 2 reveals that compared with external CSR, distributive injustice induces fewer negative emotions in the presence of internal CSR and the mediating role of negative emotions detected by the facial expression analysis software is also verified.

Practical implications

The authors hope that the findings of this paper can provide theoretical references for enterprise managers to enhance their employee governance, develop more effective intervention policies and formulate corresponding coping mechanisms to prevent and mitigate workplace revenge behaviors.

Originality/value

First, this paper enriches the literature on the relationship between injustice and organization revenge by introducing CSR as an employee governance tool. Second, this paper reconciles prior inconsistent findings about employee response to CSR in the occurrence of negative events by distinguishing between external and internal CSR and examining the differential moderating effects of two types of CSR. Such distinction is derived from the heterogeneous justice perceptions arising from different CSR actions. In addition, the authors measure participants’ negative emotions through a multi-method approach integrating the latest technology for facial expression analysis and the PANAS scale, which represents a method advancement and provides implications for measuring emotions.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 October 2019

Aisha Sarwar and Lakhi Muhammad

This paper aims to investigate the impact of injustice, discrimination and incivility on organizational performance in the hotel industry. In addition to this, the study…

1306

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the impact of injustice, discrimination and incivility on organizational performance in the hotel industry. In addition to this, the study also investigates the mediating effects of discrimination and incivility between distributive injustice, procedural injustice and organizational performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted to collect the data from hotel industry employees on a structured questionnaire by using convenience sampling approach. PLS-SEM was used to analyze the useable data of 285 respondents. In addition to this, to evaluate the predictive performance of exogenous constructs newly suggested hold out sample approach in PLS-SEM was also considered.

Findings

Results indicate that incivility and procedural injustice has a negative and significant effect on organizational performance, while the impact of distributive injustice and discrimination on organizational performance was insignificant. Further, incivility was found to be a significant mediator, while mediation of discrimination was not supported between distributive injustice, procedural injustice and organizational performance.

Practical implications

Findings are important for hotel managers to adjust their strategies to improve organizational performance.

Originality/value

This study contributes in existing literature by concentrating on predictors that undermine the organizational performance. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the early studies to contribute in literature by investigating the impact of injustice perceptions on employee perceptions specifically perceived incivility and perceived discrimination on organizational performance. Further, it also investigated the mediating impact of perceived incivility and perceived discrimination between injustice perceptions and organizational performance. Such considerations have implications for researchers, students and practitioners. For researchers, this study helps to ponder on an alternative approach by considering those factors which may undermine organizational performance, instead of focusing only on those factors which enhance organizational performance. For research students, such contribution will bring a new avenue to consider further research. Managers will find help to control such factors which minimize organizational performance.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ulla Normann, Chris Ellegaard and Morten Munkgaard Møller

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: first, it attempts to determine whether suppliers perceive distributive justice (equity) when their key customers implement…

1321

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two-fold: first, it attempts to determine whether suppliers perceive distributive justice (equity) when their key customers implement sustainable sourcing initiatives based on assessment governance, composed of codes of conduct and auditing; second, it generates insights into specific costs, rewards, and investments and how these together result in perceived equity.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research design was adopted for this study. A total of 30 executives from textile manufacturing suppliers in China, India, and Bangladesh were interviewed to determine their perceptions of distributive justice in relation to their key customers’ sustainable sourcing initiatives.

Findings

Most of the interviewees perceived that their customers’ assessment of governance initiatives was unfair. Four types of suppliers are identified based on their varying perceptions of the equity equation.

Research limitations/implications

The findings introduce distributive justice as an important mediating variable between assessment-based governance and compliance. They also provide insights into the various types of perceived costs, rewards, and investments related to sustainable sourcing, and how they form varieties of the equity equation. The findings rely on a limited number of respondents and should, therefore, be researched further.

Practical implications

Assessment based on codes of conduct and auditing is the most prevalent sustainable sourcing governance approach, but suppliers may perceive this as an injustice leading to non-compliance. Buying companies are therefore advised to consider supplier perceptions of costs, rewards, and investments and adapt their sustainable sourcing initiatives accordingly.

Social implications

Increased consideration of distributive justice in sustainable sourcing should increase the likelihood of supplier compliance, improving conditions for employees in global textile plants.

Originality/value

Extant research has studied the connection between assessment-based sustainability governance and compliance or overall performance. This paper contributes by suggesting that distributive justice might be a mediating variable helping to explain this connection.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2020

Xiaodong Li, Chen Zhang, Juan Chen and Shengliang Zhang

The domain of monetary donation is evolving with the combination of professional donation platforms and social network sites (SNSs) in the agency process, potentially…

Abstract

Purpose

The domain of monetary donation is evolving with the combination of professional donation platforms and social network sites (SNSs) in the agency process, potentially enhancing information communication and facilitating money transfers between donors and recipients. However, SNS donation avoidance hinders the leveraging of significant economic and social values. To address the limited understanding of the phenomenon of SNS donation avoidance, this study aims to investigate the influencing factors of people's avoidance behavior in the agency process of SNS donation.

Design/methodology/approach

A model was devised containing four process-related factors (requests overload, process ambiguity, channel security concerns and perceived distributive injustice) as antecedents of SNS donation avoidance, with probable mediating paths of negative emotions, altruistic outcome expectation and egoistic outcome expectation. Data were collected through a survey of 398 users of WeChat Moment in China. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the proposed model.

Findings

All four process-related factors have positive associations with SNS donation avoidance. Requests overload, channel security concerns and perceived distributive injustice all positively influence people's expectation of negative emotions and lead, in turn, to their SNS donation avoidance. Perceived distributive injustice also leads to SNS donation avoidance via negatively influencing people's expectations of both altruistic and egoistic outcomes.

Originality/value

Theoretically, this empirical study synthetically associates process-related factors to donation avoidance through the paths of emotional responses and rational outcome expectations. Practically, it emphasizes key factors to consider in the process management of SNS donation.

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Swagato Chatterjee

Extant literature on queuing has identified service queues as social systems where social justice is an important factor for service evaluation. First-order justice…

Abstract

Purpose

Extant literature on queuing has identified service queues as social systems where social justice is an important factor for service evaluation. First-order justice, defined as a first-come first-served (FCFS) process, has been found to be a necessary condition of social justice and positive evaluation. Second-order justice, defined as equal waiting time, has been found to be an additional factor which comes into play only when first-order justice is met. This paper aims to show that in the emerging market situation, the above definitions of justice and the order mentioned above does not work.

Design/methodology/approach

Instead of equal wait, the study has focused on equitable wait, i.e. waiting duration is in sync with the service needs. Three experiments have been performed to establish the hypotheses suggested.

Findings

FCFS is found not to be the necessary condition as it was in the extant literature and can be relaxed sometimes to get higher service evaluation by ensuring justice from the equitable wait. The study also portrays the interaction effects of the two types of social justice on service evaluation. Moreover, the impact of justice from equitable wait on service evaluations is found to be moderated by perceived personal connect of the service provider and the consumer, perceived importance of system and process and perceived ability of the service provider of capacity improvement and mediated by perceived control of service provider on providing the justice of equitable wait.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes toward the understanding of social justice in service queues. It also contributes to the literature of attribution theory and consumer betrayal.

Practical implications

The study provides suggestions to retail managers in emerging markets to choose queue management strategies depending on the size of the retail shops and consumers’ expectations from them.

Originality/value

The study introduces the concept of justice from the equitable wait, which is original in the queuing literature to the best of the author’s knowledge. The study also finds a new order of justice in the emerging market scenario.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 June 2012

Roy K. Smollan

Staff facing organizational change often experience negative emotions when they anticipate or encounter injustice and these can lead to turnover, absenteeism, decreased…

Abstract

Staff facing organizational change often experience negative emotions when they anticipate or encounter injustice and these can lead to turnover, absenteeism, decreased productivity and resistance to change. The aims of this study were to identify the nature of the emotions reported by respondents and explore how they were triggered by perceptions of different forms of injustice: distributive, procedural, interpersonal and informational. A series of interviews with those playing different roles in change initiatives, at various hierarchical levels and in a range of organizations, demonstrates the corrosive effects of perceived injustice and the attendant negative emotions such as anger, frustration, anxiety and guilt. These emotions tended to be more intense for those experiencing change and somewhat subdued for those leading and managing it. The findings contribute to research into organizational change by presenting insights into the affective elements of four types of injustice that have seldom been explored in previous qualitative studies.

Details

Experiencing and Managing Emotions in the Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-676-8

Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Denis Chênevert, Genevieve Jourdain, Nina Cole and Brigitte Banville

The purpose of this paper is to integrate Greenberg's perspective on the connection between injustice and stress in order to clarify the role of organisational justice…

2876

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to integrate Greenberg's perspective on the connection between injustice and stress in order to clarify the role of organisational justice, burnout and organisational commitment in the understanding of absenteeism.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out among 457 workers of a large healthcare establishment in the Canadian public healthcare sector. The model was tested using structural equation methods.

Findings

The results reveal that procedural and interactional justices have an indirect effect on exhaustion through distributive injustice. Moreover, it was found that distributive injustice is indirectly linked to short‐term absences through exhaustion. By contrast, the relationship between distributive injustice and long‐term absence can be explained by two mediating variables, namely, exhaustion and psychosomatic complaints.

Research limitations/implications

In spite of the non‐longitudinal nature of this study, the results suggest that the stress model and the medical model best explain the relationship between organisational injustice and absenteeism, while the withdrawal model via organisational commitment is not associated in this study with absenteeism.

Practical implications

Healthcare managers should consider the possibility of better involving employees in the decision‐making process in order to increase their perception of procedural and interactional justice, and indirectly reduce exhaustion and absenteeism through a greater perception of distributive justice.

Social implications

For the healthcare sector, the need to reduce absenteeism is particularly urgent because of budget restrictions and the shortage of labour around the world.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to provide a complete model that analyses the stress process in terms of how organisational justice affects short‐ and long‐term absences, in a bid to understand the specific process and factors that lead to shorter and longer episodes of absence.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 11 August 2014

Kwok Leung

A defining feature of international business is the necessity for people from diverse cultural backgrounds to interact and collaborate but intercultural interaction is…

Abstract

A defining feature of international business is the necessity for people from diverse cultural backgrounds to interact and collaborate but intercultural interaction is difficult and may give rise to disagreement and conflict. I have been working on the dynamics that promote positive intercultural interaction in the international business context, and two streams of my research, one empirical and the other conceptual, are reviewed here. The first stream is concerned with fairness issues surrounding the pay disparity between locals and expatriates in multinational enterprises operating in China, which has implications for MNC operations in other emerging economies. My research has shown that the pay disparity is associated with negative reactions from local employees but some management practices associated with the relationship between locals and expatriates, attributions made by locals, and salient norms about the pay disparity can buffer such negative reactions. In this research program, the focus is not on the actual interaction between locals and expatriates. To address this gap, a conceptual framework is presented, which provides insight about the factors that contribute to positive interaction between locals and expatriates. This paper ends with implications for future research on intercultural interaction in the MNC context.

Details

Multidisciplinary Insights from New AIB Fellows
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-038-4

Keywords

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