Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 January 2022

Pinghao Ye, Liqiong Liu and Joseph Tan

This paper aims to explore the influence of organisational justice (including distributional justice, procedural justice and interactional justice) and ethical leadership…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the influence of organisational justice (including distributional justice, procedural justice and interactional justice) and ethical leadership on employees’ innovation behaviour and to analyse the role of ethical leadership in regulating the relationship between organisational justice and employees’ innovation behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the key factors affecting employees’ innovation behaviour from three forms of organisational justice (distributional justice, procedural justice and interactional justice) and ethical leadership. The questionnaire survey method is used to survey Chinese industrial workers. A total of 323 valid questionnaires are collected, and the model is verified by SmartPLS.

Findings

The study found that distributional justice and interactional justice in organisational justice had a significant positive influence on employees’ innovation behaviour. Ethical leadership had a significant positive influence on employees’ innovation behaviour and interactional justice. At the same time, ethical leadership has a significant regulatory effect on the relationship between interactional justice and employees’ innovation behaviour. The study also found that procedural justice had a significant positive influence on distributional justice and interactional justice.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is limited to industrial workers in Hubei, China, and the research objects need further expansion. In terms of research methods, future research will use other laboratory research methods, combining experimental environments with real-world situations, enhancing the scientific nature of research methods and increasing the credibility of research results.

Practical implications

In management practice, organisations can take various measures to improve the interaction level of employees, improve employees’ perception of organisational distribution justice by establishing a scientific distribution system, give full play to the role of ethical leadership, implement more ethical management and stimulate employees' innovation behaviour.

Originality/value

This research theorises the relationship between distributional justice, interactional justice and employees' innovation behaviour and enriches the research system of employees' innovation behaviour. At the same time, it examines the regulatory effect of ethical leadership on the relationship between interactional justice and employees' innovation behaviour, which helps enrich the mechanism of ethical leadership affecting employees' innovation behaviour path. It clarifies the mechanism of the interaction among distributional justice, procedural justice and interactional justice and expands the research theory of organisational justice.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Bindu Gupta, Karen Yuan Wang and Wenjuan Cai

Managing tacit knowledge effectively and efficiently is a huge challenge for organizations. Based on the social exchange and self-determination theories, this study aims…

Abstract

Purpose

Managing tacit knowledge effectively and efficiently is a huge challenge for organizations. Based on the social exchange and self-determination theories, this study aims to explore the role of social interactions in motivating employees' willingness to share tacit knowledge (WSTK).

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a survey approach and collected data from 228 employees in service and manufacturing organizations.

Findings

Interactional justice and respectful engagement are positively related to WSTK. The perceived cost of tacit knowledge sharing (CostTKS) partially mediates the relationship between interactional justice and WSTK. Respectful engagement moderates the negative relationship between interactional justice and the perceived CostTKS.

Research limitations/implications

The study advances the understanding of the role of social interaction in facilitating employee WSTK by integrating the direct and intermediate relationships involving the effect of supervisor's interactional justice and peers' respectful engagement and employee perceived CostTKS on WSTK.

Practical implications

The findings have important practical implications for organizations as these suggest how organizations can help tacit knowledge holders experience less negative and more supportive behaviors when they engage in voluntary TKS.

Originality/value

This study examines the effect of both vertical and horizontal work-related interactions on perceived CostTKS and sequentially on WSTK, thereby extending existing literature.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 21 October 2013

Darren C. Treadway, L.A. Witt, Jason Stoner, Sara Jansen Perry and Brooke A. Shaughnessy

Based on social exchange theory and the norm of reciprocity, interactional justice has been proposed to be an important construct in explaining individual performance…

Downloads
2038

Abstract

Purpose

Based on social exchange theory and the norm of reciprocity, interactional justice has been proposed to be an important construct in explaining individual performance. However, meta-analytic results have noted the relationship is modest at best. The present study extends the understanding of the justice-performance relationship by empirically examining how interactional justice and political skill interactively influence contextual job performance. Focusing on interpersonal aspects of justice and performance, the paper proposes that the existence of interactional justice will only lead to improvements in interpersonally facilitative behavior if employees recognize this situation as an opportunity to invest their skill-related assets into the organization. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating research on political skill with social exchange theory, the current study contends that interactional justice stemming from the supervisor will likely lead to employees feeling obligated and/or wanting to help, cooperate, and consider others in the workplace. However, only employees with political skill will be able to recognize the conditions and act appropriately on these conditions. As such, this paper investigates the moderating role of political skill in the interactional justice-performance relationship. The paper used multi-source survey methodology and applied hierarchical moderated multiple regression analysis to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results from 189 respondents indicated that interactional justice was more strongly related to supervisor-rated interpersonal facilitation when employees possessed higher levels of political skill. This suggests that when both interactional justice and political skill are high, the potential for interpersonal facilitation is also high. Conversely, when one or both are low, interpersonal facilitation is less likely.

Originality/value

Previous articulations and evaluations of the relationship between interactional justice, political skill, and interpersonal facilitation have omitted either situational determinants of motivation or individual differences in job-related skills. With the current study, the paper sought to address these omissions by exploring the interactive effects of interactional justice and political skill on interpersonal facilitation.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Piyali Ghosh, Alka Rai and Apsha Sinha

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of…

Downloads
8292

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether perceptions of distributive, procedural and interactional justice are related to employee engagement, as an extension of the antecedents-consequences model of Saks (2006), and to examine the possibility of inter-relationships between these three dimensions of justice.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey of 210 employees of public sector banks in India covered measures of job and organization engagement (OE) proposed by Saks (2006) and the scale on distributive, procedural and interactional justice developed by Niehoff and Moorman (1993). The relationships between justice perceptions and engagement were analysed using correlations and hierarchical regression analysis.

Findings

Results show that distributive, procedural and interactional are inter-related with each other. Further, distributive and interactional justice take precedence over procedural justice in determining job engagement, while distributive justice plays the most important role in determining OE, followed by procedural and interactional justice.

Practical implications

By highlighting the inter-relationships among the three dimensions of justice, this study offers useful insights into the underlying processes through which job and OE can be improved through these inter-relationships. Findings also highlight the application of concepts like relative deprivation in Indian public sector banks to increase the engagement levels of their employees.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the very small number of studies that have investigated the role of interactional justice in enhancing job and OEs. It has also established inter-relationships between the three dimensions of organizational justice and their individual roles in determining job and OEs.

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2012

Edward C. Tomlinson

This research aims to separate the effect of a promise from an apology, examine interactional justice as a theoretical mechanism explaining the relationship between these…

Downloads
1255

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to separate the effect of a promise from an apology, examine interactional justice as a theoretical mechanism explaining the relationship between these accounts and post‐violation trust, examine how message content compares to the gesture of sending a message, and test offense severity as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed the Trust Game.

Findings

Results indicated significant apology × promise and apology × promise × offense severity interactions on interactional justice, and interactional justice fully mediated the relationship between promises and post‐violation trust.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study was completed using a laboratory game with anonymous partners, results suggest that interactional justice provides a means for relationships to quickly get back on track after a violation. Specifically, promises provide “forward‐looking” information (trustworthy intent) and interpersonal sensitivity (demonstration of courtesy and concern) that enable interactional justice to affect subsequent trust.

Practical implications

These findings attest to the efficacy of clear accounts to foster interactional justice; in particular, apologies lead to higher interactional justice for less serious offenses. Furthermore, accounts that are “forward‐looking” lead to higher post‐violation trust via interactional justice perceptions.

Originality/value

Recent empirical studies suggest that apologies are associated with higher post‐violation trust, but, unlike this article, have not explicated this process or its boundary conditions.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 March 2019

Alice J.M. Tan, Raymond Loi, Long W. Lam and Lida L. Zhang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether embedded employees proactively provide voice for future improvement, and how interactional justice moderates this relationship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether embedded employees proactively provide voice for future improvement, and how interactional justice moderates this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from the administrative staff and their immediate supervisors of a major university located in Southern China. The data were analyzed using hierarchical linear modeling.

Findings

Job embeddedness was positively related to voice behavior toward organization (VBO) but not to voice behavior toward work unit. Interactional justice was positively related to both types of voice behavior. The relationship between job embeddedness and VBO was stronger among employees who perceived lower interactional justice.

Practical implications

To encourage voice behavior, organizations should attempt to enhance employees’ job embeddedness by adopting human resource strategies such as providing training that helps employees to meet their long-term career goals. This is particularly important when supervisors fail to treat their employees with fairness. When employees are treated with fairness by supervisors, they are also motivated to speak up. Thus, supervisors should pay attention to the ways in which they interact with employees.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the existing knowledge of the consequences of job embeddedness by examining its relationship with voice, a proactive behavior which can benefit the organization but is considered as risky by the employees. Additionally, studying the moderating effect of interactional justice enriches the understanding of the conditions under which the relationship between job embeddedness and voice may vary. It also reveals the uncertainty management process underlying the influences of job embeddedness and interactional justice on voice behavior.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 48 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Alice H.Y. Hon and Lin Lu

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the interactional justice of supervisors and the job performance of…

Downloads
1017

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the social exchange theory, the purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between the interactional justice of supervisors and the job performance of subordinates in an expatriate context. Specifically, the authors take a relational approach by introducing help intention directed to the supervisor (upward help intention) as the mediator. The moderating role of distributive justice in the relationship between upward help intention and job performance is also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted among 232 service employees and their expatriate supervisors in multinational hotels in China. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was conducted to test the proposed model.

Findings

The statistical results of this study supported the positive effect of interactional justice on job performance as well as the mediating effect of upward help intention. Meanwhile, it was also found that when the level of distributive justice is high, the relationship between upward help intention and job performance is strengthened, whereas the effect is leveled off when the level of distributive justice is low.

Practical implications

The findings of this study suggest that managers in the service industry should be sensitive in treating their subordinates, as it will lead to positive interpersonal relationship, which in turn, will stimulate job performance. Moreover, the fair organizational compensation system aids the managers in turning good interpersonal results into positive performance outcomes.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature on justice by revealing the relational mechanism between interactional justice and job performance, and the economic boundary of this relationship.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2020

Thuy T. Dang and Anh D. Pham

While technological advances have been changing the way that services are delivered to customers, direct interaction between banks’ front-line staff and customers still…

Abstract

Purpose

While technological advances have been changing the way that services are delivered to customers, direct interaction between banks’ front-line staff and customers still holds its distinct position in the banking sector. This research investigates the relationship between interactional justice and the willingness of commercial banks’ front-line staff to engage in customer-centric behaviors, as well as the mediators behind this relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

This research combined both qualitative and quantitative research methods. In-depth interviews were employed to explore the potential mechanisms underlying the relationship between interactional justice and customer-centric behavior and to develop the specific measurement scale for customer-centric behavior in the banking service context. A survey was conducted to test the conceptual model using a sample of 312 customer contact employees working in Vietnamese commercial banks.

Findings

The research results indicate that interactional justice significantly enhances employees’ willingness to engage in customer-centric behaviors, and this relationship is partially mediated by overall job satisfaction and the leader-member exchange relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This research faces several limitations. The first limitation concerns the fact that the data are based on self-reports, which might lead to common method biases. Second, this study used a sample drawn from the North of Vietnam only. Third, this study adopted a limited set of measurement items due to the concerns of model parsimony and data collection efficiency. Fourth, we followed prior justice work to assume the linear relationship between interactional justice and leader-member exchange, in which the leader-member exchange is hypothesized to be the outcome of fair treatment (Erdogan and Liden, 2006; Masterson et al., 2000). Last, we only considered how leaders treat their followers through the lens of interactional justice, while interactional justice differentiation has also been affirmed as a crucial determinant of leader-member exchange and employees’ performance.

Originality/value

This research is noteworthy that it is the first to take a social exchange perspective to examine customer-oriented behavior as an outcome of interpersonal interactions in the workplace. Accordingly, it delivers a key message to bank supervisors: “Treat employees the way you want your customers to be treated.”

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Helena Syna Desivilya, Yoav Sabag and Efrat Ashton

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the factors promoting prosocial behavior, focusing on the role of attachment styles in individuals' construal of social…

Downloads
1973

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on the factors promoting prosocial behavior, focusing on the role of attachment styles in individuals' construal of social exchanges in organizations and in shaping their tendencies for organizational citizenship behaviors. Positive relationships between secure attachment styles and organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) tendencies, and between secure attachment styles and perceptions of interactional justice were postulated. A moderating effect of interactional justice on the relationships between attachment styles and OCB tendencies was also posited.

Design/methodology/approach

The participants were 212 individuals (165 women and 47 men), enrolled as undergraduate students (most with substantial work experience) at a college in Northern Israel. Self‐report structured questionnaires were used to assess the research variables.

Findings

The findings support the hypothesis, that antecedents of prosocial behavior in organizations may depend on individual schemas concerning the nature of interpersonal relationships as manifested in attachment styles. Individuals equipped by secure attachment, positive schemas of interpersonal relationships are more likely to exhibit prosocial tendencies at work in contrast with their insecure counterparts. The results confirmed the hypothesis postulating positive association between secure attachment and perceptions of interactional justice. Partial evidence was obtained supporting the contention, that interactional justice moderates the relationsips between attachment and OCB. Research limitations/implications – Future research should address the limitations of and extend the current research: trace the mechanisms whereby attachment styles unfold their effect on prosocial behaviors in organizations, extend the research samples beyond student population, measure the research variables by means other than self‐report.

Originality/value

The study introduces the internal working models of attachment as a new antecedent, a pervasive blueprint, guiding individual social experiences and actions such as OCB.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Ivy Kyei-Poku

Despite the importance of interactional fairness, it has been assessed less frequently in literature than has procedural and distributive justice. The effects of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the importance of interactional fairness, it has been assessed less frequently in literature than has procedural and distributive justice. The effects of interactional fairness are at times stronger than the effects for procedural and distributive fairness, given that supervisors are prominent in any workplace environment and the chief source for interpreting information related to matters such as suitable business practices and goals needed by organizations. This study aims to examine the mediating mechanisms through which interactional justice influences emotional exhaustion and turnover intentions. Specifically, the hypothesis proposes that perceived organizational support and a sense of belongingness simultaneously mediates the relationship between interactional justice and emotional exhaustion, which in turn affects withdrawal cognitions.

Design/methodology/approach

The author draws on the literature and studies on the link between organizational justice, stress and turnover to develop the hypotheses, collecting data from 141 employees of different organizations and occupations.

Findings

Results of partial least squares structural equation modeling and Preacher and Hayes’ (2004) bootstrapping approach reveal that interactional justice is significantly positively associated with perceptions of organizational support and belongingness, which in turn is negatively associated with emotional exhaustion.

Research limitations/implications

Interactionally fair treatment engenders perceptions of organizational support and heightens a sense of belongingness, subsequently reducing the burden of physical and emotional fatigue on individuals and thereby freeing employees from engaging in turnover cognitions.

Practical implications

The study underscores the importance of fair supervisors. Results suggest that fair supervisors help employees estimate the extent to which their organization is supportive. In addition, fair supervisors reassure subordinates that they are valued, which in turn lessens the experience of emotional exhaustion, giving organizations a competitive advantage due to the more favorable behavioral intentions held by employees.

Originality/value

Interactional justice has been assessed less frequently in literature than has procedural and distributive justice. Research has overlooked the underlying process of how interactional justice reactions might motivate emotional exhaustion and turnover intentions responses. Thus, this study identifies an expanded group of mediators that link interactional justice to emotional exhaustion and turnover intentions.

1 – 10 of over 2000