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Article
Publication date: 17 January 2023

Ayesha Zahid and Shazia Nauman

Building on the conservation of resources theory, this research explored the processes underlying the association between perceived workplace incivility and deviant…

Abstract

Purpose

Building on the conservation of resources theory, this research explored the processes underlying the association between perceived workplace incivility and deviant behaviors. Specifically, we tested a mediating mechanism, an interpersonal conflict that has received less consideration in the workplace incivility literature. The authors also tested the organizational climate (i.e. a resource) as a moderator in the perceived workplace incivility–employees’ deviant work behavior relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

Time-lagged research design was followed to explain the relationship of variables. Survey data were collected at time 1 and time 2 from 220 service sector working professionals to test the proposed model.

Findings

The findings suggest that intrapersonal conflict partially mediates the workplace incivility–deviant work behavior relationship. Further, the authors found that the harmful effects of workplace incivility on employees’ deviant work behavior attenuate in the presence of organizational climate as a resource. The results shed light on the beneficial consequences of organizational climate on employees’ work behavior by attenuating workplace incivility and mitigating their deviant work behaviors.

Originality/value

Overall, the study contributed to understanding the mediating role of interpersonal conflict and the moderating role of organizational climate in explaining the workplace incivility–deviant work behavior relationship.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 December 2022

Deni Gustiawan, Noermijati Noermijati, Siti Aisjah, Nur Khusniyah Indrawati and Hendryadi Hendryadi

Integrating the conservation of resources theory, Hofstede's national culture theory and the cognitive-motivational-relational theory of emotions, the authors propose that…

Abstract

Purpose

Integrating the conservation of resources theory, Hofstede's national culture theory and the cognitive-motivational-relational theory of emotions, the authors propose that power distance (as a moderator) and emotional exhaustion (as a mediator) play a role in the relationship between workplace incivility, emotional exhaustion and job embeddedness.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in two stages using an online survey of 404 employees from three sectors, including hospitality, banking and manufacturing, in Indonesia. The authors tested a moderated mediation model using Hayes' macro PROCESS version 3.5.

Findings

Workplace incivility contributes to emotional exhaustion, which predicts job embeddedness. Emotional exhaustion also contributes to job embeddedness. In the moderation model, the authors found that the effect of workplace incivility on emotional exhaustion was more substantial for employees with high perceived power distance. Furthermore, power distance also played a moderating role in the relationship between emotional exhaustion and job embeddedness.

Practical implications

Since workplace incivility and job embeddedness differ across cultures, the results of this study contain practical management implications for Indonesian settings, especially the hospitality, manufacturing and banking sectors. The authors provide practical management implications for redesigning organizational culture to help employees avoid uncivil interactions in the workplace. The authors also provide implications concerning strategic managerial directions to improve communication and supervisors' skills at all levels of management.

Originality/value

This study is the first to introduce power distance as a complementary explanation for the relationship between workplace incivility, emotional exhaustion and job embeddedness while focusing on an Asian developing country.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Vijay Kuriakose, Maria Tresita Paul V. and Sumant Kumar Bishwas

This study aims to analyze the direct relationship between workplace incivility and employee well-being among frontline hotel employees. Anchoring on affective events…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the direct relationship between workplace incivility and employee well-being among frontline hotel employees. Anchoring on affective events theory, this study also analyzes the explanatory role of loneliness and the role of workplace social support as a boundary condition influencing the proposed relationships in the model.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses were collected from 243 frontline hotel employees using established scales in two-time points through survey method. The proposed hypotheses were analyzed using SPSS PROCESS macros.

Findings

The results confirmed the detrimental effect of incivility at work on employee well-being and the mediating role of loneliness at work. This. study has also demonstrated that workplace social support conditions the mediated effect of workplace incivility on employee well-being via loneliness.

Practical implications

This study has vital practical implications for mitigating the adverse effects of workplace incivility on employee well-being through loneliness at work by developing interventions that foster social support among employees. This study also provides directions to reduce workplace incivility and loneliness at work.

Originality/value

This study provides a unique understanding of the consequences of workplace incivility on employee well-being. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this could be the first study that has established loneliness as a pathway linking workplace incivility and employee well-being. This study results have unique significance in the management of hospitality employees.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Deborah Gervasi, Guglielmo Faldetta and Lamberto Zollo

The present work investigates the micro-mechanisms underlying the link between psychological contract violation (PCV) and incivility in women employees. Building on social…

Abstract

Purpose

The present work investigates the micro-mechanisms underlying the link between psychological contract violation (PCV) and incivility in women employees. Building on social exchange theory (SET) and the norm of reciprocity, the authors utilized a multi-dimensional variable, labeled “Aggressive Reciprocal Attitude” (ARA), composed of three sub-constructs, namely anger, hostility and negative reciprocity, to explain negative women's uncivil behaviors. Further, the effect of conscientiousness is hypothesized to restrain the mechanism of ARA.

Design/methodology/approach

Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) and Covariance-based Structural Equation Modeling (CB-SEM) were used on a sample of 194 women from 4 different organizations to empirically validate the proposed conceptual model and test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Women's ARA is shown as a partial mediator of the relationship between PCV and incivility. Conscientiousness significantly moderates the link between ARA and incivility.

Practical implications

Managers should avoid stereotyping women as more compliant and submissive. Based on women's tendency to reciprocate negatively, this study’s findings suggest that reducing the negative reciprocity attitude is advisable by demonstrating that negative responses are an unsuccessful strategy and encouraging other forms of reaction.

Originality/value

By introducing the negative reciprocity attitude in the construction of the variable ARA, the authors overcome the contradiction between the social role theory, according to which women avoid unsociable behaviors, and studies demonstrating a remarkable presence of conflicts among women.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 October 2022

Zahoor Ahmad Parray, Shahbaz Ul Islam and Tanveer Ahmad Shah

The main goal of this research study is to look at the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion in the association between workplace incivility and job outcomes (job…

Abstract

Purpose

The main goal of this research study is to look at the mediating effect of emotional exhaustion in the association between workplace incivility and job outcomes (job stress, job satisfaction, and employee turnover intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gathered field data from individuals working in the higher education sector of Jammu and Kashmir to test the proposed study paradigm. A total of 550 respondents reported their perceptions of workplace incivility, emotional exhaustion, and job-related outcomes (job stress, job satisfaction, and employee turnover intention) at Time 1 in the Kashmir division and Time 2 in the Jammu division of Jammu and Kashmir via a two-wave data collection design.

Findings

The findings supported the hypothesized relationships, demonstrating that emotional exhaustion acts as a mediator between workplace incivility and employee job outcomes (job stress, employee job satisfaction, and employee intention to leave).

Practical implications

The findings of this research study will assist organizations and practitioners in comprehending the implications of workplace incivility and emotional exhaustion, as well as how they positively impact job-related outcomes (employee job stress, turnover intention), and negatively on job satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study adds to existing knowledge on COR theory by suggesting workplace incivility as a stressor and also testing emotional exhaustion as a defense mechanism for determining the effect of workplace incivility on employee job outcomes.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 June 2015

Michael P. Leiter, Emily Peck and Stephanie Gumuchian

Workplace incivility has been identified as a specific form of social mistreatment causing distress despite its low intensity. Research on workplace incivility has touched…

Abstract

Workplace incivility has been identified as a specific form of social mistreatment causing distress despite its low intensity. Research on workplace incivility has touched on a variety of personal and contextual factors associated with incivility’s prevalence including research on both antecedents and outcomes. The research has been especially concerned with identifying a wide range of negative consequences of incivility, including various occupational, interpersonal, and health-related implications. Theoretical explorations have considered links of incivility to sexism and racism, and its reflection of attachment styles, as well as its inherent connection with the stressor-emotion model of counterproductive work behavior (Spector & Fox, 2005). The power of incivility to elicit distress has been attributed to its capacity to signal riskiness of social situations that thwart core social motives (i.e., self-control). Intervention research has been relatively rare, but progress is evident.

Details

Mistreatment in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-117-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Arieh Riskin, Peter Bamberger, Amir Erez and Aya Zeiger

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited…

Abstract

Incivility is widespread in the workplace and has been shown to have significant affective and behavioral consequences. However, the authors still have a limited understanding as to whether, how and when discrete incivility events impact team performance. Adopting a resource depletion perspective and focusing on the cognitive implications of such events, the authors introduce a multi-level model linking the adverse effects of such events on team members’ working memory – the “workbench” of the cognitive system where most planning, analyses, and management of goals occur – to team effectiveness. The model which the authors develop proposes that that uncivil interpersonal behavior in general, and rudeness – a central manifestation of incivility – in particular, may place a significant drain on individuals’ working memory capacity, affecting team effectiveness via its effects on individual performance and coordination-related team emergent states and action-phase processes. In the context of this model, the authors offer an overarching framework for making sense of disparate findings regarding how, why and when incivility affects performance outcomes at multiple levels. More specifically, the authors use this framework to: (a) suggest how individual-level cognitive impairment and weakened coordinative team processes may mediate these incivility-based effects, and (b) explain how event, context, and individual difference factors moderators may attenuate or exacerbate these cognition-mediated effects.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2022

Jie Yin, Yingchao Ji and Yensen Ni

As supervisor incivility and its negative effect may impact employees’ psychological health and even the sustainable development of hospitality enterprises, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

As supervisor incivility and its negative effect may impact employees’ psychological health and even the sustainable development of hospitality enterprises, this study aims to explore the channels through which it affects employee turnover intention in China’s hospitality industry and suggest possible mitigation measures.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopted exploratory factor analysis, measurement model analysis and the mediation and moderation model and used SPSS and PROCESS for the analysis.

Findings

This study found that the impact of supervisor incivility on the employees’ turnover intention would be through employees’ ego depletion and revealed that organizational support would alleviate such a negative effect. However, organizational support might not mitigate the impact of supervisor incivility on the employees’ ego depletion, which is inconsistent with previous studies. This study inferred that organizational support might be somewhat related to organizational pressure, thereby enhancing the impact of supervisor incivility on the employees’ ego depletion.

Research limitations/implications

This study not only enriches incivility literature but also suggests new insights into the mixed role of organizational support.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies that mainly focused on workplace pressure from colleagues or customers, this study broadens our understanding of the employees’ turnover intention affected by supervisors’ workplace incivility and the mixed role of organizational support.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Susan Wildermuth and Corey B. Davis

This chapter explores the ever-growing problem of uncivil electronic discourse directed by students at faculty in higher education. After providing a definition of uncivil…

Abstract

This chapter explores the ever-growing problem of uncivil electronic discourse directed by students at faculty in higher education. After providing a definition of uncivil discourse, the authors explore potential influences on the rapid increase in uncivil digital communication, among them the nature of technology, different definitions of politeness, and the nature of higher education. The chapter next surveys the various factors (e.g., age, familiarity with technology, gender, mental state, personality, and professorial teaching style) that add to the likelihood that students may engage in uncivil electronic discourse before detailing the many effects of such communication, including stress, cynicism, lower standards, student suffering, and physical violence. The chapter concludes with possible remedies: proactive problem-focused coping strategies for faculty and administrators (e.g., detailed syllabi, published campus standards for student and employee behavior, and training for faculty, students, and staff on issues of incivility); reactive problem-focused coping strategies for faculty; and emotion-based coping strategies for faculty.

Details

Misbehavior Online in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-456-6

Article
Publication date: 21 October 2022

Maria Tresita Paul Vincent, Nimmi P.M., Geetha Jose, Anjali John and Vijay Kuriakose

This study aims to explore how family incivility is linked to workplace bullying among employees. This study examines the role of psychological safety as an explanatory…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore how family incivility is linked to workplace bullying among employees. This study examines the role of psychological safety as an explanatory mechanism linking both. This paper also looks into the moderating roles of optimism between family incivility and psychological safety and organization-based self-esteem (OBSE) between psychological safety and workplace bullying.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the conservation of resources theory and work home resources model, this study developed various hypotheses. The proposed relationships were tested using responses gathered from 260 teaching faculty across the universities in India. This study used Warp-PLS for data analysis.

Findings

The findings suggest that psychological safety mediated the relationship between experienced family incivility and workplace bullying. This study also found support for the mediating role of psychological safety. Further, this study has proved that trait optimism and OBSE are boundary conditions influencing the outcomes of family incivility.

Practical implications

The findings have practical implications for teachers, educational institution leaders and policymakers. This study augments the importance of cultivating optimism and OBSE to combat conflicting situations. Employees who practice optimism on a daily basis are high in psychological safety and when supported with OBSE by the institution, the impact of family incivility and its adverse effects in the workplace is reduced, curbing the instances of workplace bullying.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is one of the first studies to establish the role of “organizational resource,” OBSE, as a coping mechanism in tackling the adverse effects of family incivility. From a resource perspective, this study is one of the first to look into the enablers and inhibitors of resource creation in an individual while experiencing family incivility.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

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