Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2021

Yogarajah Nanthagopan and Nigel L. Williams

The aim of this study is to examine the configuration of project resources in organizations operating in a post-conflict country environment using a Resource-Based View…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to examine the configuration of project resources in organizations operating in a post-conflict country environment using a Resource-Based View (RBV) perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collection was undertaken using a quantitative survey study of Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) involved in development projects in Sri Lanka, which obtained 445 responses. An Exploratory Factor Analysis and subsequent Confirmatory Factor Analysis were performed to identify and confirm the Project Management (PM) resource profile composition of these organizations.

Findings

The study identified resource profiles incorporated items at the team, organizational and collaborative social resource levels and did not differ significantly by organization type. This suggests that the current focus of PM RBV research that implicitly uses a competitive advantage derived framework may need to be adapted for contexts such as post-conflict environments.

Research limitations/implications

For organizations seeking to deliver projects in developing countries, the findings indicate that relational capacity in the form of a collaborative social resource may be required to adapt team and organizational resources to post-conflict environments.

Practical implications

The lessons learnt from NGOs can be of value to other organisations seeking to operate in post-conflict environments. The findings from this research reveal that organizations in Sri Lanka establish resource profiles that meet domestic and external requirements. For the management of these organizations, recognition of the inherent contradictions of this strategy can enable the optimization of resource profiles, improving organizational efficiencies.

Originality/value

The study has used insights from NGOs involved in international and local development projects to extend current knowledge of PM resources. While NGOs are distinctive, the critical PM resources identified here may be of value to private and public organizations seeking to develop project resource profiles adapted to emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 14 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1997

David Twigg

Contends, contrary to some media portrayals of the Internet as a surfer’s playground without signposts, that the Internet does offer some direction to serious researchers…

Downloads
1634

Abstract

Contends, contrary to some media portrayals of the Internet as a surfer’s playground without signposts, that the Internet does offer some direction to serious researchers seeking operations and production management information. Attempts to decipher the Internet as a medium for information gathering and to explain how it may be used as a resource for those in the operations management field. Aims to assist the Internet novice to find his or her point of embarkation and to introduce the more experienced user to new sources of useful data. Considers how the Internet may be used to promote the operations and production management discipline, and suggests ways in which both academics and practising managers may participate and so benefit.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 2 May 2006

Larry Nash White

There have been many challenges and uncertainties in determining the future direction(s) for performance measurement (PM) in Florida public libraries over the years…

Abstract

There have been many challenges and uncertainties in determining the future direction(s) for performance measurement (PM) in Florida public libraries over the years. Social pressures for establishing increased accountability and community needs combined with the library administrators need to respond to these pressures served as the catalysts for the need to evolve PM processes in Florida public libraries.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-403-4

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Paul E. Levy, Steven T. Tseng, Christopher C. Rosen and Sarah B. Lueke

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed…

Abstract

In recent years, practitioners have identified a number of problems with traditional performance management (PM) systems, arguing that PM is broken and needs to be fixed. In this chapter, we review criticisms of traditional PM practices that have been mentioned by journalists and practitioners and we consider the solutions that they have presented for addressing these concerns. We then consider these problems and solutions within the context of extant scholarly research and identify (a) what organizations should do going forward to improve PM practices (i.e., focus on feedback processes, ensure accountability throughout the PM system, and align the PM system with organizational strategy) and (b) what scholars should focus research attention on (i.e., technology, strategic alignment, and peer-to-peer accountability) in order to reduce the science-practice gap in this domain.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-709-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 July 2020

Antti Salonen and Maheshwaran Gopalakrishnan

The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of the Swedish manufacturing industry to implement dynamic, data-driven preventive maintenance (PM) by identifying…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to assess the readiness of the Swedish manufacturing industry to implement dynamic, data-driven preventive maintenance (PM) by identifying the gap between the state of the art and the state of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

An embedded multiple case study was performed in which some of the largest companies in the discrete manufacturing industry, that is, mechanical engineering, were surveyed regarding the design of their PM programmes.

Findings

The studied manufacturing companies make limited use of the existing scientific state of the art when designing their PM programmes. They seem to be aware of the possibilities for improvement, but they also see obstacles to changing their practices according to future requirements.

Practical implications

The results of this study will benefit both industry professionals and academicians, setting the initial stage for the development of data-driven, diversified and dynamic PM programmes.

Originality/Value

First and foremost, this study maps the current state and practice in PM planning among some of the larger automotive manufacturing industries in Sweden. This work reveals a gap between the state of the art and the state of practice in the design of PM programmes. Insights regarding this gap show large improvement potentials which may prove important for academics as well as practitioners.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 December 2015

Minna Saunila, Kati Tikkamäki and Juhani Ukko

– The purpose of this paper is to study the role of performance management (PM) in the use of reflective work practices.

Downloads
1300

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the role of performance management (PM) in the use of reflective work practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical evidence was collected during a one-year, action-oriented research project.

Findings

According to the results, PM can support the use of reflective work practices by affecting and guiding the human behavior in an organization. In this study, five roles of PM are emphasized in order to support reflective practices at work: making reflective work practices visible, supporting reflective dialogue, creating a favorable measurement culture, clarifying the goals at all organizational levels and motivating employees to use reflective work practices by means of compensation and rewards.

Practical implications

The results of the study can help professionals realize that reflective work practices may benefit organizational performance.

Originality/value

There is limited research and discussion on how a PM process through the use of reflective practices contributes to human resource management (HRM) and organizational effectiveness. In addition, PM literature has neglected the potential of reflective work practices in achieving performance at different levels (individual, group and organization). Reflective work practices, where individuals learn from their own and from each other’s professional experiences, may be the most important source of professional development and improvement. This paper argues that PM can also support this type of learning, and thus guide and motivate people in attaining business goals.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Beth Ashmore, Maria Collins, Christenna Hutchins and Lynn Whittenberger

Several years ago, North Carolina State (NC State) University Libraries technical services department, Acquisitions & Discovery (A&D), merged acquisitions, cataloging, and…

Abstract

Several years ago, North Carolina State (NC State) University Libraries technical services department, Acquisitions & Discovery (A&D), merged acquisitions, cataloging, and electronic resources management functions and staff. One intended outcome for the merger included integrating and distributing electronic resources management across all staff positions whereby staff would be trained to manage a larger portion of the life cycle for print and electronic resources. The benefits of a life cycle approach for both print and electronic resources included better staff understanding of resources; staff ownership of packages; and improved staff follow-through, consistency, and ability to troubleshoot. Key positions were reimagined to support this effort. This included the creation of a staff package manager role in the serials unit to provide oversight of e-journal packages, distribute work to staff, and create and maintain an information dashboard (the Electronic Resources Hub) for staff as well as for other stakeholder departments across the libraries. The monographs unit has recently adopted a similar integrated approach to manage NC State's growing collection of e-books. This chapter will outline A&D implementation of two package management models, one for serials and one for monographs; describe the associated tools and technologies used for support; and discuss lessons learned. Benefits will be discussed to illustrate how other libraries might transform their electronic resource management operations by using a package management strategy.

Details

Technical Services in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-829-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 1 June 2018

Anastasia Guimaraes, Laurie McGowan, Miranda VanNevel and Zheng Wang

The first part of the chapter discusses the premise that “wearing many hats” impedes a professional’s ability to get successful project results in a library setting…

Abstract

Purpose

The first part of the chapter discusses the premise that “wearing many hats” impedes a professional’s ability to get successful project results in a library setting. Offering their own experience as an example, the authors explore the issues that led to the implementation of project manager as a full-time position at Hesburgh Libraries. Part two of the chapter offers practical suggestions for incorporating a project management office (PMO) into a library setting. It includes the definition of the virtual PMO model, how this model fits into the organizational structure, and why this model might be preferred in a library environment. It includes descriptions of basic project management tools, techniques, and methods as well as graphic representation of division and overlap of responsibilities.

Methodology/approach

The methodology of this chapter is based on a review of the literature as well as a description of the authors’ experience with implementing project management at their institution.

Findings

Project management is a profession that requires dedicated personnel and resources. Actively involved project sponsors and dedicated project managers play a critical role in assuring project success. Basic project management tools, techniques, and approaches can be successfully implemented in libraries.

Originality/value

Full-time project management in libraries is still a novel concept. Readers will benefit from Hesburgh Libraries’ implementation of new methodology and learn about tools and approaches to introduce project management in their organizations.

Details

Project Management in the Library Workplace
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-837-4

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Kaveh Asiaei, Ruzita Jusoh and Nick Bontis

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore how the effect of intellectual capital (IC) on organizational performance is indirect and mediated through performance…

Downloads
1537

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically explore how the effect of intellectual capital (IC) on organizational performance is indirect and mediated through performance measurement (PM) systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a survey of 128 chief financial officers of Iranian publicly listed companies. Hypotheses were tested using partial least squares regression, a structural modeling technique which is appropriate for highly complex predictive models.

Findings

Results from the structural model indicate that, in general, companies with a higher level of IC place a premium on the balanced use of PM systems in a diagnostic and interactive style. Furthermore, the results provide some evidence that IC is indirectly associated with organizational performance through the intervening variable of the balanced use of interactive and diagnostic PM systems.

Practical implications

This study sheds light on the issue of how senior management should use PM systems to take full advantage of intellectual assets which could lead to improved organizational performance.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind to synthesize a model which examines IC, PM systems, and organizational performance. Although the effect of different types of intangible assets on performance has been substantially examined in the literature, less effort has been devoted to understanding the role of PM systems in leveraging an organization’s IC.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

E. Frank Harrison and Monique A. Pelletier

This article posits a paradigm of levels of success for strategic decision outcomes. A high level of strategic decision success is normally preceded by a positive…

Downloads
6843

Abstract

This article posits a paradigm of levels of success for strategic decision outcomes. A high level of strategic decision success is normally preceded by a positive strategic gap in which the strengths of the organization clearly outweigh its weaknesses. Three comprehensive cases are set forth as practical applications to illustrate and confirm the paradigm of levels of strategic decision success. Philip Morris’s decision in 1984 to diversify into the food processing industry is proffered as the epitome of a highly successful strategic choice. General Motors’ decision in 1978 to reinvent the corporation is advanced as a hallmark of a marginally successful strategic outcome. And Walt Disney’s decision in 1996 to acquire Capital Cities/ABC is cited as an example of a strategic choice with an indeterminately successful outcome. The conclusions in all three cases are supported by current research findings.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000