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1 – 10 of over 80000
Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Justine Virlée, Allard C.R. van Riel and Wafa Hammedi

This study aims to develop a better understanding of how online health community (OHC) members with different health literacy (HL) levels benefit from their participation…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a better understanding of how online health community (OHC) members with different health literacy (HL) levels benefit from their participation, through the analysis and comparison of their resource integration (RI) processes. It investigates through a RI lens how the vulnerability of community members – captured as their level of HL – affects the benefits they derive from participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative methods were used to investigate the effects of healthcare service users’ vulnerability. Data were collected about their profiles and levels of HL. Furthermore, 15 in-depth interviews were conducted.

Findings

The study demonstrates how low levels of HL act as a barrier to the integration of available online health resources. Participation in OHCs appears less beneficial for vulnerable users. Three types of benefits were identified at the individual level, namely, psychological quality-of-life, physical quality-of-life and learning. Benefits identified at the community level were: content generation and participation in the development of the community.

Originality/value

This study has implications for the understanding of how service users’ activities affect their own outcomes and how the vulnerability of users could be anticipated and considered in the design of the community.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 September 2018

Elizabeth Matheus and Ruth Abankwah

The purpose of this paper is to determine the learners’ perceptions on the use of online resources at the Namibian College of Open Learning (NAMCOL) Yetu Yama Resource Center.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the learners’ perceptions on the use of online resources at the Namibian College of Open Learning (NAMCOL) Yetu Yama Resource Center.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a mixed methods research approach which was also used by other researchers such as Hamutumwa (2014). It enabled the researchers to delve into the topic under study by conducting a survey using self-administered questionnaires to collect data from learners, and a semi-structured interview guide, to collect data from the Librarian, the Director and tutors. The target population for the study was Grade 12 distance learners registered with NAMCOL for the academic year 2016, librarians and tutors. Convenient sampling was used to select 200 Grade 12 distance NAMCOL learners: one Director, one Librarian and five tutors were purposeful selected as they manage the Yetu Yama Resource Centre. The Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) was used to generate descriptive data, while qualitative data were manually analysed using content analysis. This approach enabled the researcher to identify key themes which emerged from the interviews.

Findings

Almost all the learners (159) opted for printed materials. The challenges experienced by learners included slow internet, as indicated by 78 (39 per cent); limited facilities, 60 (30 per cent); and inability to find relevant information, 46 (23 per cent), coupled with lack of proper guidance on the use of e-resources as indicated by 16 (8 per cent) learners.

Research limitations/implications

This study was limited to Yetu Yama Resource Center. The results cannot be generalised to all distance learners in Namibia.

Practical implications

The results of this study could guide librarians in Namibia when planning and/or upgrading e-resources.

Social implications

Once the learners are equipped with the required skills, they will make optimum use of the e-resources which are provided by NAMCOL.

Originality/value

This is the first study to be conducted at NAMCOL, and it is hoped that the results will be applied to other tertiary institutions which offer distance education in Namibia.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

7513

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Daqing He, Dan Wu, Zhen Yue, Anna Fu and Kim Thien Vo

This paper aims to identify the opinions of undergraduate students on the importance of internet‐based information sources when they undertake academic tasks.

3498

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the opinions of undergraduate students on the importance of internet‐based information sources when they undertake academic tasks.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a set of identified typical academic tasks for undergraduate students, three research questions were designed around the students' usage and views of information resources for completing these tasks. Web‐accessible questionnaires were used to collect data from participants in two universities in the USA and China, and the data were analyzed using quantitative methods, which included several statistic methods.

Findings

The results confirm that undergraduate students use different information resources for various academic tasks. In their tasks, online electronic resources including search engines are the most commonly used resources, particularly for complex academic tasks. Social networking sites are not used for the students' individual academic tasks, and traditional resources still play equal or more important roles in certain specific academic tasks. Students in collaborative tasks look for resources that make it easy to share documents. Participants from the two countries also exhibit interesting and important differences in their usage of information resources.

Originality/value

This study examines undergraduate students' usages and views of different information resources in their various academic tasks, and pays special attention to the impacts of being from their different countries. The study also considers both students' individual academic tasks and collaborative tasks. This study is an invaluable addition to the information seeking behaviour literature.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Jason Rhode, Stephanie Richter, Peter Gowen and Murali Krishnamurthi

As faculty professional development increasingly occurs online and through social media, it becomes challenging to assess the quality of learning and effectiveness of…

Abstract

Purpose

As faculty professional development increasingly occurs online and through social media, it becomes challenging to assess the quality of learning and effectiveness of programs and resources, yet it is important to evaluate such initiatives. The purpose of this paper is to explore how one faculty development center experimented with using analytics to answer questions about the use and effectiveness of its web and social media resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study was based on direct observation of the center’s practice and review of selected data generated by the analytic tools.

Findings

Unfortunately, while some analytics are available from a variety of sources, they are often distributed across tools and services. The center developed an analytics strategy to use data from Google Analytics and social media reporting tools to assess the use of online and social professional development resources. Initial results show that the center’s online and social professional development resources are widely used, both within and outside the university. However, more work is necessary to improve the strength and scope of the available analytics.

Practical implications

As a result of the analysis, the center has streamlined online resources, targeted social media use, and has begun developing methods to allow faculty to report online resource use as professional development for academic personnel purposes.

Originality/value

Many faculty development centers have not explored methods of evaluating online and social media resources. This paper outlines a strategic evaluation plan to measure the usage of online resources as well as engagement and interaction through social media.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2022

Dilara Begum and Md. Hasinul Elahi

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the East West University Library’s (EWUL’s) response to COVID-19 situation through their transformation to digital services. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the East West University Library’s (EWUL’s) response to COVID-19 situation through their transformation to digital services. The paper tries to explain how these digital library services support the user community of East West University (EWU) in online teaching and access to information resources.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper describes the EWUL’s several digital services that are used to meet the needs of its user community during the COVID-19 pandemic. The reflective practice approach has been undertaken for this study on the basis of the authors’ personal experiences working at an academic library. The authors used the reflective practice approach to assess the library’s practice during crisis situation, make the use of technological interventions in service providing and also to re-innovate the digital services for future.

Findings

During the pandemic, the library shifted all the possible physical or on-site services to digital services, i.e. online resource facilities and remote access to these, federated searching, Web online public access catalog, engaging users through social media, specialized knowledge space, online document delivery, article on request, information literacy training, virtual reference service, etc. The user engagement in all these services is also notable.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of this study is limited to the COVID-19 pandemic and within a particular geographic location.

Practical implications

This paper has implications and possible applications for other university libraries in developing countries, which intends to transform their services into digital for ensuring better service quality for their respective user community.

Originality/value

This paper makes a valuable contribution to the literature on how a private university library of a developing country is responding to pandemics such as COVID-19.

Details

Digital Library Perspectives, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5816

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

5525

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Raj Kumar Bhardwaj and Margam Madhusudhan

– The purpose of this paper is to compare the online legal information sources available in law libraries in India.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the online legal information sources available in law libraries in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Evaluation method followed with the help of specially designed checklist for e-resources in the field of law in India. The structured checklist was designed keeping in view of the objectives and e-resources/databases existing in Indian libraries, comprising 189 dichotomous questions and categorized into 12 broad categories.

Findings

The study revealed that the study legal information sources are lagging behind in exploiting the full potential of Web 2.0 features. No study legal information source has integrated Web 2.0 tools with contents and provision to contribute the contents by user any time, irrespective of location, except online legal information system (OLIS). Majority of e-resources are lacking search features, general features, Web 2.0 tools, better help features and provision to contribute contents by the users. Besides this, a mobile-based view is not available in majority of sources, and open access resources are lacking user-friendly features. Of the 16 legal information resources, only five have all the four citations search parameters. The study reveals that the OLIS has the maximum features and ranked “excellent”, followed by Manupatra ranked “average”. Half of study online legal information sources are ranked “needs improvement” and 37.5 per cent ranked “below average”.

Practical implications

The findings of the study will not only guide the law librarians to subscribe/renew legal databases in their libraries but also improve the legal information literacy among the users for effective use of online legal information sources. It is hoped that the evaluation of online legal information sources will enhance the user’s awareness and increase the use.

Originality/value

The findings of the study will not only guide the legal libraries to improve their online legal information sources, particularly, better help features and integrated content with Web 2.0 tools, but also provide guidelines for newly established legal libraries in India.

Details

New Library World, vol. 117 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

3152

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Soohyung Joo and Namjoo Choi

The purpose of this paper is to explore multiple factors affecting online library resource selection by undergraduate students. Three dimensions of factors are…

3932

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore multiple factors affecting online library resource selection by undergraduate students. Three dimensions of factors are investigated including usefulness and ease-of-use, resource quality, and individual differences.

Design/methodology/approach

An instrument was developed to measure various aspect factors and online library resource use intention. A survey was administered to 332 undergraduate students. Quantitative analysis, including structural equation modeling, ANOVA, and t-tests, was used to statistically examine the effects of the identified 11 factors on the use intention of online library resources.

Findings

The findings indicated that both usefulness and ease-of-use positively influenced the undergraduates’ use intention of online library resources. Also, five resource quality constructs – accessibility, credibility, coverage, currency, and format – were the determinants of online library resources use intention. Interestingly, the effect of accessibility was the strongest, while that of credibility was the weakest. In addition, this study found that familiarity with sources and use of good search skills had a significant effect on users’ use intention at the individual user level.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies investigating multiple factors comprehensively that influence online library resource selection.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 80000