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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2023

Amelia Talbot, Michelle O'Reilly and Nisha Dogra

The paper aims to explore the anxiety of university students. The authors note that the rhetoric of the snowflake is frequently invoked in lay discourse to characterise a…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the anxiety of university students. The authors note that the rhetoric of the snowflake is frequently invoked in lay discourse to characterise a generation of young people as overly sensitive. This misleading conceptualisation is potentially stigmatising.

Design/methodology/approach

Interviews were conducted with tweleve young women (18–25 years) about anxiety during their transition through university and into adulthood.

Findings

The authors identified three themes: (1) students in a modern world, (2) gendered demands and (3) anxiety of adulting. Analysis demonstrated numerous, transecting and discourse-informed anxieties about modern life.

Practical implications

University professionals may benefit from understanding the gendered dimensions of anxiety associated with transitions to adulthood, including the increased pressures to succeed and achieve.

Originality/value

The arguably pejorative label of “snowflake” could negatively impact the social progress made in recognising the importance of taking care of mental health and help-seeking. This is especially concerning for females, as they have higher prevalence of anxiety conditions than males.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Riya Elizabeth George, Nisha Dogra and Bill Fulford

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the challenges of teaching values and ethics in mental-health, explore the differing perspectives of the key stakeholders and stimulate further questions for debate in this area; leading to a proposal of an alternative approach to educating mental-health professionals on values and ethics.

Originality/value

In current mental-health care settings, very few professionals work with homogeneous populations. It is imperative that mental-health education and training ensures health professionals are competent to practice in diverse settings; where ethics and values are bound to differ. Establishing professional practice not only involves considering concepts such as values and ethics, but also equality, diversity and culture. Incorporating values-based practice and cultural diversity training holds promise to education and training, that is truly reflective of the complexity of clinical decision making in mental-health. Further research is needed as to how these two frameworks can be unified and taught.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 December 2015

Claire Bone, Pat Dugard, Panos Vostanis and Nisha Dogra

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ understandings of mental health and their learning preferences, in order to provide guidance for developing targeted mental…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine students’ understandings of mental health and their learning preferences, in order to provide guidance for developing targeted mental health education.

Design/methodology/approach

A study-specific self-administered questionnaire was used at two English schools (n=980; ages 11-18), incorporating a combination of open-ended and fixed-choice items. Data were subject to content analysis, cross-tabulation of frequencies and statistical analyses.

Findings

Overall, students understood mental health in terms of personal attributes or disorder, however older students were more likely to talk about relationships. Males were less likely to say they wanted to learn about mental health than females, believing they had no need to learn more. White students were also less interested in learning about mental health than Indian students. Overall, students said they would not use social media to learn, however Indian students were most likely to want to use it. Younger students preferred school-based learning to online.

Research limitations/implications

The questionnaires were study specific and self-report. However interesting demographic variations in responses were found, worthy of further exploration.

Social implications

Policymakers should consider targeted mental health interventions in schools and research the potential roles/barriers of the internet and social media. Long-term possible benefits relate to improved preventative strategies within schools.

Originality/value

Previous research has focused on the delivery of mental health promotion/education in schools, whereas the current study drew on a large sample of students to understand how they define mental health for themselves, as well as how they prefer to learn about it.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2014

Nadzeya Svirydzenka, Claire Bone and Nisha Dogra

Mental health of children and young people is often discussed in terms of mental illness, however, such an approach is limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore young…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental health of children and young people is often discussed in terms of mental illness, however, such an approach is limited. The purpose of this paper is to explore young people's views of what mental health is and how to stay mentally healthy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigated young people's views on these two issues through a series of workshops. In total 218, 13-year-old schoolchildren produced posters with their impressions of the issues. Themes that young people identified were then discussed with them in terms of the existing Bright Futures definition of mental health. Poster responses were subsequently transcribed and thematically analysed.

Findings

The paper identified a number of themes for each question. Mental health was viewed in terms of personal attributes of an individual, illness, ability for personal management and establishing social relations. Young people saw mental health maintained through a combination of lifestyle choices, personal attributes, management of self and environment, social support and relationships, as well as treatment of illness. These themes corresponded to the ones identified by the Bright Futures.

Research limitations/implications

This study highlights the complexity of young people's views on the meaning of mental health. They were also more positive, open and competent in discussing mental health than previously suggested. However, a more systematic investigation of views and attitudes is necessary, including younger children. Additionally, health care professionals are likely to benefit from young people's engagement in planning and implementing strategies for better mental health.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few to investigate the positive meaning of mental health with young people.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2008

Ruth Edwards, Richard Williams, Nisha Dogra, Michelle O'Reilly and Panos Vostanis

Specialist CAMHS provide skilled assessment and interventions for children, young people and their families who have mental health disorders. The training needs of the staff who…

Abstract

Specialist CAMHS provide skilled assessment and interventions for children, young people and their families who have mental health disorders. The training needs of the staff who work in specialist CAMHS are not always clear or prioritised, due to the complexities and differing contexts in which specialist CAMHS are provided. The aim of this paper was to establish stakeholders' experiences of service complexities and challenges that affect training within specialist CAMHS. The project employed interviews to gain wide‐ranging consultation with key stakeholder groups. The sample consisted of 45 participants recruited from policy departments, professional bodies, higher education providers, commissioners, service managers, and practitioners. The participants identified a number of themes that limit training, and put forward solutions on how these could be facilitated in the future. Emerging themes related to leadership and the role of service managers, strategic management of training, commissioning, levels of staff training, resources, impact of training on service users, and availability of training programmes. The findings emphasise the need for the strategic workforce planning of training to meet service delivery goals. Policy, commissioning, workforce training strategies, service needs, and delivery of training should be integrated and closely linked.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2024

Nicola Cobelli and Silvia Blasi

This paper explores the Adoption of Technological Innovation (ATI) in the healthcare industry. It investigates how the literature has evolved, and what are the emerging innovation…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the Adoption of Technological Innovation (ATI) in the healthcare industry. It investigates how the literature has evolved, and what are the emerging innovation dimensions in the healthcare industry adoption studies.

Design/methodology/approach

We followed a mixed-method approach combining bibliometric methods and topic modeling, with 57 papers being deeply analyzed.

Findings

Our results identify three latent topics. The first one is related to the digitalization in healthcare with a specific focus on the COVID-19 pandemic. The second one groups up the word combinations dealing with the research models and their constructs. The third one refers to the healthcare systems/professionals and their resistance to ATI.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s sample selection focused on scientific journals included in the Academic Journal Guide and in the FT Research Rank. However, the paper identifies trends that offer managerial insights for stakeholders in the healthcare industry.

Practical implications

ATI has the potential to revolutionize the health service delivery system and to decentralize services traditionally provided in hospitals or medical centers. All this would contribute to a reduction in waiting lists and the provision of proximity services.

Originality/value

The originality of the paper lies in the combination of two methods: bibliometric analysis and topic modeling. This approach allowed us to understand the ATI evolutions in the healthcare industry.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2023

Luiz Philipi Calegari, Barkokebas R.D. and Diego Castro Fettermann

The evolution of e-health technologies presents promising alternatives for health-care excellence. Despite the benefits arising from mobile e-health (m-health) and wearables…

Abstract

Purpose

The evolution of e-health technologies presents promising alternatives for health-care excellence. Despite the benefits arising from mobile e-health (m-health) and wearables technologies, the literature stands many contradictories signs regarding how users accept and engage in using these technologies. This study aims to synthesize the estimations about m-health user acceptance technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A meta-analytic structural equation modeling was carried out using the 778 relationships estimated by 100 previous research. The estimations follow the relations and constructs proposed in the UTAUT2 technological acceptance model.

Findings

The results indicate the performance expectancy, effort expectancy, social influence and habit constructs are most important for predicting the behavioral intention of use of m-health technologies. The Latin American users of e-health technologies are still underestimated in the literature.

Originality/value

The study presents a guide to understanding the acceptance process of m-health technologies and delivers a general orientation for developing new m-health devices considering their acceptance by users.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

Keywords

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