Search results

1 – 10 of over 144000
Article
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Jacquiline Daniel and Faraja Ndumbaro

Human resource capability is an important factor in determining institutional capacities in digital records preservation. This study aims to assess human resource…

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource capability is an important factor in determining institutional capacities in digital records preservation. This study aims to assess human resource capabilities in supporting digital records preservation in Tanzania, with special reference to the Records and Archives Management Department (RAMD) and Registration, Insolvency and Trusteeship Agency (RITA).

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a descriptive case study design with multiple cases to generate insights into the topic under inquiry. Simple random and purposive sampling methods were used to select study respondents. Data were collected using questionnaires, interviews and documentary review. Qualitative data collected were subjected to content analysis, whereas quantitative data were analysed using international business machine-corporation-statistical packages and service solution.

Findings

RAMD and RITA have minimal human resource capabilities, as they contend with a shortage of qualified staff and technical personnel for digital records preservation. The shortage of funds, lack of management commitment to preserving digital records, lack of staff awareness on digital records preservation and inadequate participation of records practitioners in digital records preservation emerged as pressing challenges the two agencies contended with.

Practical implications

This study’s recommendations include finding alternative sources of funding, employing digital records specialists and provision of training on digital records preservation. Furthermore, this study proposes a framework that institutions can use in assessing human resource capabilities for digital records preservation.

Originality/value

This study contributes new knowledge and insights on the role of human resource capabilities in supporting digital records preservation in a resource-poor country.

Details

Records Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-5698

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2022

Antoinette Pavithra, Russell Mannion, Neroli Sunderland and Johanna Westbrook

The study aimed to understand the significance of how employee personhood and the act of speaking up is shaped by factors such as employees' professional status, length of…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to understand the significance of how employee personhood and the act of speaking up is shaped by factors such as employees' professional status, length of employment within their hospital sites, age, gender and their ongoing exposure to unprofessional behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

Responses to a survey by 4,851 staff across seven sites within a hospital network in Australia were analysed to interrogate whether speaking up by hospital employees is influenced by employees' symbolic capital and situated subjecthood (SS). The authors utilised a Bourdieusian lens to interrogate the relationship between the symbolic capital afforded to employees as a function of their professional, personal and psycho-social resources and their self-reported capacity to speak up.

Findings

The findings indicate that employee speaking up behaviours appear to be influenced profoundly by whether they feel empowered or disempowered by ongoing and pre-existing personal and interpersonal factors such as their functional roles, work-based peer and supervisory support and ongoing exposure to discriminatory behaviours.

Originality/value

The findings from this interdisciplinary study provide empirical insights around why culture change interventions within healthcare organisations may be successful in certain contexts for certain staff groups and fail within others.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2022

Rebekah A. Freese, Kelli E. Canada, Pagena M. Nichols and Brianna McNamara

Suicide prevention and intervention in prisons is a challenge. Prisons were not designed to be clinical facilities, yet with the growing numbers of people who face mental…

Abstract

Purpose

Suicide prevention and intervention in prisons is a challenge. Prisons were not designed to be clinical facilities, yet with the growing numbers of people who face mental health challenges in prisons, staff require knowledge and skills to adequately address mental health crises, especially suicide. This study aims to: describe trends in suicide attempts and completions within one state’s prison system and measure staff knowledge and preparedness to address suicide.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses a nonexperimental research design and two data sources. Administrative data from 2000 to 2017 on serious suicide attempts and completions were analyzed, and all correctional staff employed in the state’s Department of Corrections were surveyed at one point in time. Univariate and bivariate analyses were conducted.

Findings

The number of serious suicide attempts trended up but completed suicides decreased. Correctional staff demonstrated high suicide knowledge of risk factors and warning signs of suicide. Staff who viewed a media-based suicide training displayed significantly more knowledge of suicide and perceived greater preparedness compared to staff who did not or did not recall viewing the training.

Originality/value

Corrections staff play a key role in preventing suicides in prison. Innovative intervention is needed to increase suicide awareness, improve communication and enhance prevention skills.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2022

Asad Mohsin, Ana Brochado and Helena Rodrigues

This study aims to provide a critical reflection research that was carried out to understand more fully how employee turnover has been critical to hotel management’s…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide a critical reflection research that was carried out to understand more fully how employee turnover has been critical to hotel management’s strategies for constructing a better workplace. Human resources decisions need to be made carefully based on a clear grasp of their effects on hotels and their staff.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical review was conducted with a sample of 160 academic papers that reported findings on staff turnover intentions in hotels.

Findings

The results include a concept map that highlights the two main dimensions found by researchers: hotel staff turnover consequences (i.e. customer satisfaction and financial performance) and antecedents (i.e. individual, job-related, relationship, organisational and opportunities).

Research limitations/implications

The findings underline that staff retention strategies need to focus on managing job-related, organisational and relationship variables as hotel managers have little influence on individual and job opportunity factors.

Originality/value

This study examined 20 years of research summarised in an up-to-date conceptual map. The findings have cross-disciplinary implications.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 November 2022

Genevieve d’Ament, Anthony John Saliba and Tahmid Nayeem

The prevalence of visually splendid multi-million-dollar cellar doors (CDs) builds an assumption that bricks and mortar create the co-created cellar door experience (CDE)…

Abstract

Purpose

The prevalence of visually splendid multi-million-dollar cellar doors (CDs) builds an assumption that bricks and mortar create the co-created cellar door experience (CDE). This study aims to determine what attracts the visual attention of staff and customers during a CDE at three visual designs of CD: lively, stylised and simple.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 23 customers and five staff consented to record their CDEs using TobiiPro2 glasses with 35 recordings providing 993 min for analysis with Tobii Pro Lab. Twenty-five areas of interest were used to calculate fixation and visit metrics.

Findings

The most attended elements of a co-created CDE were staff and faces. Attention is less influenced by the design of CD, whereas staff significantly influence attention.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are valuable to the industry as they highlight the importance of human resources to a winery business, an increasingly casualised workforce. Future research could focus on staffing needs, including training and performance during experience delivery, with the expectation of increasing profitability.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to analyse objective recordings of staff and customer visual attention during their experience.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 November 2022

Suhaidah Binti Hussain, Ebrahim Hamid Hasan Sumiea, Mohd Hanafiah Ahmad, Senthil Kumar and Taofeeq Durojaye Moshood

In order to ensure effectiveness of staff's performance using online meetings applications during coronavirus disease (COVID-19), having the behavioural intention is…

Abstract

Purpose

In order to ensure effectiveness of staff's performance using online meetings applications during coronavirus disease (COVID-19), having the behavioural intention is mandatory for staff to measure, test, and manage the staff's data. Understanding of Public Higher Education Institution (PHEI) staffs' intention and behaviour toward online meetings platforms is needed to develop and implement effective and efficient strategies. The objectives of this paper to identify the factors that affect staff to use online meetings applications, to develop a model that examining the factors that affect PHEI staff to online meetings applications and to validate the proposed model. This study used a cross-sectional quantitative correlational study with using UTAUT2 model by validating the model and mediating variables to enhance the model's explanatory power and to make the model more applicable to PHEI staff's behavioural intention.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in Malaysia from March to May 2021. The survey took place using Google form and was send to PHEI staff for answer. This research particularly chooses PHEI as the location to carry out the research due to two main factors. Statistical analysis and hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling based on the optimisation technique of partial least squares. SmartPLS software, Version 3.0 (Hair et al., 2010) was used to conduct the analysis. A conceptualised estimation model was “drawn in” the partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to analyse the consequences of the variables' relationships. In essence, the PLS-SEM simulation was carried out in a model by assessing and computing various parameters that included elements like validity, durability, and item loading. Henseler et al. (2009) suggested a two-step method that includes PLS model parameter computing. This is accomplished by first solving the estimation model in the structural model independently before calculating the direction coefficients. The results of data analysis using SmartPLS findings and interpretation of the data are addressed. The questionnaire was extensively examined to ensure that the data obtained were presented in a clear and intelligible manner, with the use of figures, and graphs.

Findings

This current study found that the usability of the material, the reliability of operating, the impact of the PHEI staff's views on its usage, and finally the familiarity with the online meetings platforms influenced PHEI staff's behavioural intention for adoption and long-term use of online meeting platforms using UTAUT2. The staff's behavioural intention for using online meeting platforms was significantly influenced by the effort expectancy, facilitating conditions and habit of online meeting platforms. There was a clear association between “Habit” and “Behavioural Intention” for the usage of information technology in learning in several studies (El-Masri and Tarhini, 2017; Uur and Turan, 2018; Mosunmola et al., 2018; Venkatesh et al., 2003). As a consequence of the utility of online meeting platforms in daily staff meetings and learning activities, this technology has been adopted.

Originality/value

This study used UTAUT2 and structural equations modelling in this study to assess respondents' perspectives on the use of online meetings platforms in PHEI, since users' perspective is a significant factor in the adoption and acceptance of online meeting applications. Staff's behavioural intention to use online meeting platforms was effectively enhanced by “Effort Expectancy,” “Facilitating Conditions” and “Habit” in this study. The study shows that identifying PHEI staff's perspectives will effectively increase the staff's aversion to utilising online meeting platforms for online meetings purposes.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Holly Smith, Chloe Finamore, Julia Blazdell and Oliver Dale

Consultation services are recommended to support mental health staff working with service users diagnosable with personality disorder. However, there is scarce literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Consultation services are recommended to support mental health staff working with service users diagnosable with personality disorder. However, there is scarce literature examining the impact of delivering and receiving consultation services. This study aims to investigate the impact of a pilot co-produced consultation service aiding clinical teams in the engagement of service users diagnosable with personality disorder.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative evaluation using a focus group and five semi-structured interviews to explore the experience of delivering and receiving the consultation service. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Clinical and demographic characteristics were obtained on service users referred.

Findings

The consultation staff focus group produced two overarching themes: “Disrupting the system” and “Mirroring the service and the service users consulted”. The staff consultee semi-structured interviews produced two overarching themes: “Experience of working with personality disorder” and “Experience of the consultation service”. Staff described working with personality disorder as challenging. The consultation process was experienced as a helpful and reassuring space to gain a new perspective on the work. However, the service was felt to be limited; in that, it lacked follow-on treatment.

Originality/value

This study adds to the body of literature on consultation for service users diagnosable with personality disorder and demonstrates its function in service provision. It sheds light on staff experience of delivering and receiving a consultation service, including the use of a co-production model.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 10 October 2022

Alyazyah Alfalasi and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

This case study aims to yield the following learning outcomes: understand the key performance indicators of successful human resource management (HRM) in the hospitality…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

This case study aims to yield the following learning outcomes: understand the key performance indicators of successful human resource management (HRM) in the hospitality and tourism sector, especially during pandemics; identify the various concepts and strategies of HRM and recruitment over a short period; conceptualize the types of HRM practices such as safety and health, recruitment and promotion and rewards when facing pandemic conditions as well as the handling of hotel staff in strained times; evaluate the crisis management solutions used by human resources to lower the employee turnover rate; and develop a crisis management plan from a human resource standpoint in a pandemic situation.

Case overview/synopsis

A five-star hotel in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (UAE), Bab Al Qasr Hotel & Residence (BAQHotel) opened in October 2016. In April 2020, the hotel began accepting patients with COVID-19 in conjunction with the Abu Dhabi’s Healthcare Company (SEHA), as a support to the UAE Government, through Department of Culture and Tourism Abu Dhabi (DCTAD), to meet the local needs and sustain business during these unforeseen circumstances, which heavily impacted the whole World. Samer Majari, the Human Resource Director of BAQ hotel was responsible for recruiting and supervising delegates, while ensuring the comfort of hotel staff, arranging for their transportation, catering, safety and well-being. To combat the high staff turnover, including COVID-19-positive staff, Majari reviewed the existing staff model; divided the staff into two groups for providing services to both sides of the hotel; arranged for separate accommodations, food and transportation; and retained the existing resources and recruited new workers. This study aims to provide management solutions that concern hiring of staff from the existing UAE market and highlights ways of creating a lower staff turnover rate through incentives and compensations, while also managing staff by motivating them and also safeguarding them against COVID-19.

Complexity academic level

This case study intends to provide a context for creative solutions to human resource challenges facing organizations during a pandemic. It also involves swift responses to crises faced by HR managers and the immediate solutions required. Therefore, this case study can be used in undergraduate level courses for students pursuing a bachelor’s or a master’s degree in HRM, hospitality management, crisis management or international business studies. Moreover, this case study can be used for corporate training and to help hospitality industry staff, mid-level human resource managers and organizational development practitioners to better understand crisis management in their hotels.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human Resource Management

Article
Publication date: 3 October 2022

Nhung Thi Hong Hoang

The purpose of this paper is to study how people use competing accounting numbers to make sense of and legitimize actions in a complex environment in times of crisis.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how people use competing accounting numbers to make sense of and legitimize actions in a complex environment in times of crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes the implementation of a standardized budget model at a USA intergovernmental organization, by relying on a triangulation of data sources, including face-to-face interviews, direct observations, and archival documents. The organization faces one of the greatest crises it has ever experienced. An accounting team and a human resources team make sense differently the same reality–staffing. The sensemaking perspective framework is utilized to provide a theoretical structure for the analysis.

Findings

The understudied organization undergoes constant evolution during the budgetary crisis; data reveal different forms of cues, which activate the sensemaking process, such as fading and compressed cues. Although compressed cues subsequently emerge, they play a more crucial role in managers' enactment than pre-existing fading cues. Artificializing accounting numbers refer to the social process of constructing compressed cues or artificial artifacts that are neither wrong nor right, neither soft nor hard and not useful for peoples' sensemaking but used to legitimize managers' strategic decisions.

Practical implications

This artificializing process explains the people's resistance to policy implementation. Furthermore, the multiplicity of cues provides useful information for regulators and managers to understand uncertainty during a crisis.

Originality/value

This study presents a rare case of an international third sector organization amid a budgetary crisis. Among few studies referring to numbers as sensemaking resources, this study focuses on the importance of systematic power and corporate power relative to the process of sensemaking.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2022

Pras Ramluggun, Olga Kozlowska, Sarah Mansbridge, Margaret Rioga and Mahmood Anjoyeb

The purpose of this paper is to examine how faculty staff on health and social care programmes support students with mental health issues.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how faculty staff on health and social care programmes support students with mental health issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative survey design to gain in-depth information on faculty staff experiences. Seventy-one faculty staff at two universities in the South East of England out of an eligible population of 115 staff responded to an anonymous online questionnaire which were thematically analysed.

Findings

The findings indicated that faculty staff faced uncertainties in providing support to students with mental health needs. They reported tensions between their academic, professional and pastoral roles. There was a wide recognition that supporting students was physically and emotionally demanding for faculty staff and especially challenging when their roles and expectations were unclear. This was compounded by lack of explicit guidelines and an apparent severed connection between faculty staff and student support services.

Practical implications

A need for clearly defined roles and responsibilities for faculty staff in supporting students with mental health needs including a review of their pastoral role were identified. The study reinforces the need for effective collaborative arrangements and collective decision making and clearer procedures in the planning and implementation of students' personal support plans. A concerted effort into adopting a transpersonal approach which incorporates mental health staff awareness training, restorative spaces for reflection and supportive pathways for faculty staff are recommended.

Originality/value

This paper provides rare empirical evidence of faculty staff views on their role in supporting students with mental health needs on health and social care programmes.

1 – 10 of over 144000