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Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Abbie Woodhouse and Sarah Craven-Staines

Although literature surrounding sexual criminality is growing; with recent research, this paper aims to focus more upon burnout and emotional impact in therapists who…

Abstract

Purpose

Although literature surrounding sexual criminality is growing; with recent research, this paper aims to focus more upon burnout and emotional impact in therapists who study with sex offenders, little is known about possible gender differences in their experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The study presents a systematic review that aims to provide an impartial critical examination of relevant existing literature, with the main aim of exploring the role of gender (both the staff members and the clients) in staffs’ experience of working with sexual offenders.

Findings

Findings retrieved 10 eligible studies indicating evidence of the influential role in which gender plays in the experienced staff may have when working with sexual offenders. Studies within the review demonstrated variability in views towards sexual offenders across genders; with studies finding female staff to hold more positive perceptions of sexual offenders. Further evidence suggested a global impact of working with the client group; with professionals holding differential and largely more positive views of sexual offenders than the general public. However, an adverse impact of working with sexual offenders was highlighted, particularly for staff who have worked longest within their role or have increased frequency of contact.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations were highlighted in relation to the reviews ability to truly explore gender; given there are no current studies within this research area defining gender beyond male and female, losing the voices of those non-binary and transgendered individuals.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for staff working with sexual offenders; including adverse affects of the clinical contact and the impact of working with same/opposing gendered clients. Research also takes a gender informed stance in exploring how staff gender impacts the relationships with sexual offenders, and the effect this may have on client outcomes.

Originality/value

Research is the first of its kind in taking a systematic approach to exploring the current literature surrounding staffs experiences of working with sexual offenders, through a gender informed lens.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2021

The purpose of the research was to assess whether hiring temporary staff at NHS hospitals had a negative impact on the quality of work of the permanent staff. The authors…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research was to assess whether hiring temporary staff at NHS hospitals had a negative impact on the quality of work of the permanent staff. The authors wanted to test the hypothesis that taking advantage of the flexibility of temps was a “false economy” because it distracted permanent staff from focusing fully on their own tasks

Design/methodology/approach

The authors selected two London hospitals with different approaches to temporary staff recruitment. Hospital A was a major NHS Foundation Trust and teaching hospital. It used NHS Professionals (NHSP) for the provision of bank and agency nurses, as well as doctors and locums. Meanwhile, Hospital B used its own internal bank staff as temps. Managers at both hospitals were asked to assess the work of the temps and its impact on permanent staff.

Findings

Results showed the generally negative effect of using temporary staff on permanent staff. But it depended on the nature of the temps. The more experienced temps could generally be trusted to get on with the job, whereas the inexperienced ones required more supervision. Other potential problems included the temps’ unfamiliarity with procedures that slowed down their work, and sometimes a lack of motivation as they were only there for a short time.

Originality/value

Based on the results, the authors proposed an approach to improved practice beginning with “macro-level managers.” They said that they may usefully be tasked with maintaining service quality as a higher priority than contracting costs, and ensuring that policies reflect the need for adequate staffing levels. They could also encourage permanent staff to do occasional temporary shifts.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Danielle Romain Dagenhardt, Amanda Heideman, Victoria Knoche and Tina Freiburger

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a conflict management training that used a communication competence perspective. This addresses whether the training had an impact…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate a conflict management training that used a communication competence perspective. This addresses whether the training had an impact on role conflict, conflict resolution skills, horizontal violence, burnout, turnover intention and perceptions of consumers. It also assessed staff perceptions of the training.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method analysis was used using survey data from multiple time points along with focus group interviews.

Findings

The program decreased role conflict, horizontal violence and burnout among direct-care workers, whereas feelings of safety and perceptions of workers’ ability to protect themselves and others in aggressive situations increased. Furthermore, staff felt the training was useful and increased feelings of safety and empowerment at the study.

Practical implications

These findings suggest that conflict management training may need additional refresher sessions. Administrative planning is also needed to ensure training of all staff is trained in an adequate timeframe.

Originality/value

These results, although positive, are somewhat time bound. Therefore, the content of training and knowledge dissemination of conflict management training need additional research to ensure best practices.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Yaw Owusu-Agyeman and Enna Moroeroe

Scholarly studies on student engagement are mostly focused on the perceptions of students and academic staff of higher education institutions (HEIs) with a few studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Scholarly studies on student engagement are mostly focused on the perceptions of students and academic staff of higher education institutions (HEIs) with a few studies concentrating on the perspectives of professional staff. To address this knowledge gap, this paper aims to examine how professional staff who are members of a professional community perceive their contributions to enhancing student engagement in a university.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the current study were gathered using semi-structured face-to-face interviews among 41 professional staff who were purposively sampled from a public university in South Africa. The data gathered were analysed using thematic analysis that involved a process of identifying, analysing, organising, describing and reporting the themes that emerged from the data set.

Findings

An analysis of the narrative data revealed that when professional staff provide students with prompt feedback, support the development of their social and cultural capital and provide professional services in the area of teaching and learning, they foster student engagement in the university. However, the results showed that poor communication flow and delays in addressing students’ concerns could lead to student disengagement. The study further argues that through continuous interaction and shared norms and values among members of a professional community, a service culture can be developed to address possible professional knowledge and skills gaps that constrain quality service delivery.

Originality/value

The current paper contributes to the scholarly discourse on student engagement and professional community by showing that a service culture of engagement is developed among professional staff when they share ideas, collaborate and build competencies to enhance student engagement. Furthermore, the collaboration between professional staff and academics is important to addressing the academic issues that confront students in the university.

Details

Journal of Professional Capital and Community, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-9548

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2020

The authors wanted to find out if hiring temporary staff at busy A&E departments had a negative impact on the work of permanent staff.

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153

Abstract

Purpose

The authors wanted to find out if hiring temporary staff at busy A&E departments had a negative impact on the work of permanent staff.

Design/methodology/approach

They did semi-structured interviews with managers and permanent staff at two London NHS hospitals with different policies for hiring temps. Hospital A prioritized the use of NHS professions for its bank and agency nurses, as well as doctors and locums. Hospital B focused more on using its own internal bank staff as temps.

Findings

The findings showed the generally negative effect of using temporary staff on permanent staff. But the reaction of permanent staff depended on the type of temporary staff. More experienced temps could generally be trusted to get on with the job, whereas the inexperienced ones required more supervision.

Originality/value

The authors proposed an approach to improved practice beginning with “macro-level managers” who could maintain service quality as a higher priority than contracting costs. They could also encourage permanent staff to do occasional temporary shifts. The co-authors also felt that “meso-level managers” could be given the role of hiring “preferred temps” where possible.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 28 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Faye Banks, Amy Fielden, David O'Sullivan and Barry Ingham

Research into culture within intellectual disability services, has predominantly focussed on small group homes in Australia. The current investigation aimed to explore the…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into culture within intellectual disability services, has predominantly focussed on small group homes in Australia. The current investigation aimed to explore the transferability of the dimensions of culture identified in the literature, to a residential Intellectual Disability service in the UK. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of informal culture upon the behaviour of direct care staff, particularly around managing behaviour that challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with direct care staff. Interview transcripts were analysed thematically using template analysis.

Findings

Themes regarding leadership, perceptions of managers, team functioning, and relationships between direct care staff and service users, were identified, corroborating the existing literature. Additional themes relating to being aware of the risks posed by service users, and the emotional impact of behaviour that challenges, also emerged.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to explore informal culture within a community residential Intellectual Disability service in the UK.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Annika Krick, Jörg Felfe and Sarah Pischel

Drawing upon the job-demands resources and the job demands-control-support model, the authors examined the buffering effect of health-oriented leadership (HoL) in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the job-demands resources and the job demands-control-support model, the authors examined the buffering effect of health-oriented leadership (HoL) in terms of staff care on the relationship between job demands and employee health and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data from two studies (N1 = 314 and N2 = 260) were analyzed using moderation analyses.

Findings

Study 1 showed that staff care mitigates the effect of job demands on strain and health complaints. Study 2 found that staff care also buffered the effect of job demands on general health and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Particularly under high job demands, staff care is an important resource for employees' health and satisfaction. Organizations should promote leaders' staff care.

Originality/value

Findings provide further evidence for the beneficial role of leaders in terms of HoL.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 August 2021

Nikoletta Theodorou, Sarah Johnsen, Beth Watts and Adam Burley

This study aims to examine the emotional and cognitive responses of frontline homelessness service support staff to the highly insecure attachment styles (AS) exhibited by…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the emotional and cognitive responses of frontline homelessness service support staff to the highly insecure attachment styles (AS) exhibited by people experiencing multiple exclusion homelessness (MEH), that is, a combination of homelessness and other forms of deep social exclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

Focus groups were conducted with frontline staff (N = 19) in four homelessness support services in Scotland. Hypothetical case vignettes depicting four insecure AS (enmeshed, fearful, withdrawn and angry-dismissive) were used to facilitate discussions. Data is analysed thematically.

Findings

Service users with AS characterised by high anxiety (enmeshed or fearful) often evoked feelings of compassion in staff. Their openness to accepting help led to more effective interactions between staff and service users. However, the high ambivalence and at times overdependence associated with these AS placed staff at risk of study-related stress and exhaustion. Avoidant service users (withdrawn or angry-dismissive) evoked feelings of frustration in staff. Their high need for self-reliance and defensive attitudes were experienced as hostile and dismissing. This often led to job dissatisfaction and acted as a barrier to staff engagement, leaving this group more likely to “fall through the net” of support.

Originality/value

Existing literature describes challenges that support staff encounter when attempting to engage with people experiencing MEH, but provides little insight into the causes or consequences of “difficult” interactions. This study suggests that an attachment-informed approach to care can promote more constructive engagement between staff and service users in the homelessness sector.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Rebecca J Wetmiller

This study seeks to identify the role that peer team members' behaviors and superiors' preferences play in influencing the likelihood that staff auditors engage in…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to identify the role that peer team members' behaviors and superiors' preferences play in influencing the likelihood that staff auditors engage in dysfunctional audit behavior (DAB).

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses an experiment that manipulates peer team member behavior (DAB present or DAB absent) and superior preference (efficiency or effectiveness). Students enrolled in a graduate accounting course, proxying for inexperienced staff auditors, receive an internal control sample selection task. Participants assess the likelihood that a typical staff auditor would engage in DAB or non-DAB.

Findings

First, staff auditors with a peer team member who engages in DAB are more likely to engage in DAB. Second, staff auditors who have a superior with a preference toward efficiency are more likely to engage in DAB. Finally, when considered simultaneously, the effect of the superior's preference on the likelihood of staff auditors engaging in DAB is not different for staff auditors, subject to a peer engaging in DAB versus those subject to a peer who engaged in a non-DAB.

Research limitations/implications

This study uses a hypothetical audit team, a written script of team member communication, and students proxying for inexperienced staff auditors. As such, future studies might consider improving the realism of the team setting, the manner in which a message is portrayed, and implications at higher levels within the audit team hierarchy.

Practical implications

Team interactions contribute to the prevalence of DAB within the profession. Specifically, inexperienced auditors are influenced by the behavior of peer and superior team members and this may be one cause of the prevalence of DAB within the profession. As such, future firm considerations could include well-structured mentorship programs and rewards structures.

Originality/value

This study adds to the audit team literature by investigating the influence of audit team dynamics on staff auditors' behaviors. This paper extends the current audit team literature, that is mostly focused on supervisor–subordinate relationships, by investigating social influences from peers and superiors. This study's findings inform public accounting firms of areas in which personnel may negatively affect audit quality through intra-team interactions.

Details

Journal of Applied Accounting Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-5426

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Nick Smith

During the academic session 1991/92, a project wascarried out to review the strategic and operationalmanagement of the staffed public information points inthe Library and…

Abstract

During the academic session 1991/92, a project was carried out to review the strategic and operational management of the staffed public information points in the Library and Information Services at Aston University. Three main methods were used: an analysis of enquiries; a staff attitudes survey; and a customer survey. The main results which emerged were that staff perceived that there was no‐one with overall management responsibility for the service that an on‐going training programme for information point staff should be introduced; and that most customers were satisfied with the existing quality of service and approachability of the staff. Consequently, the Head of Information Services has assumed strategic and operational responsibility for the service; a rolling training programme for staff has been introduced; and a Quality Circle has been established to formulate a Customer Care Policy, and to produce recommendations for continuous improvement of the service.

Details

Library Management, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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