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1 – 10 of over 12000
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1974

N.L. Kent

Co‐operative research for the flour milling and baking industries is carried out by the Flour Milling and Baking Research Association (FMBRA). The FMBRA started its existence…

Abstract

Co‐operative research for the flour milling and baking industries is carried out by the Flour Milling and Baking Research Association (FMBRA). The FMBRA started its existence under that name in January, 1967, by the merger of two forbears—the Research Association of British Flour‐Millers (RABFM), founded in 1923 at St Albans, and the British Baking Industries Research Association (BBIRA), founded in 1946 at Chorleywood.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 74 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1947

Chester Street, Aston, Birmingham, 6. The ‘Donald’ Patent Barrel Lifter Truck and Stand, the three‐in‐one appliance. Barrels up to 7 cwts. lifted and transported by one man…

65

Abstract

Chester Street, Aston, Birmingham, 6. The ‘Donald’ Patent Barrel Lifter Truck and Stand, the three‐in‐one appliance. Barrels up to 7 cwts. lifted and transported by one man. ‘Donald’ Patent Barrel Lifter Stands for Oil Stores.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

L.M. Keswet, J.A. Ayo and C.B. Bello

Four Nigerian wheat flours were purchased in Bauchi and Jos central markets. A preliminary survey of Nigerian bread, using a questionnaire, was carried out within the Bauchi…

590

Abstract

Four Nigerian wheat flours were purchased in Bauchi and Jos central markets. A preliminary survey of Nigerian bread, using a questionnaire, was carried out within the Bauchi metropolis. The four flours were used to produce bread, the volume index and sensory quality of the products were assessed and the data subjected to analysis of variance, pq 0.05. A very high percentage of those examined (90.2 percent) consume bread, though only 52.2 percent do so regularly. Softness, sweet taste, and the slight brown colour of these bread qualities were given greater preference. The proximate analysis of these wheat flours range from 12.59‐12.81 (moisture), 12.36‐14.20 (crude protein), 1.40‐2.40 (crude fibre), 1.57‐1.72 (lipids), 0.79‐0.81 (ash), 0.34‐0.44 (calcium), 0.07‐0.08 (phosphorous). The volume index of the breads produced are 3.8, 3.6, 3.45 and 3. The sensory quality (colour, texture, flavour) were significantly affected, pq 0.05, by the variety of the wheat flour.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Moneera Othman Aljobair

The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory properties and chemical composition of corn and sorghum flakes manufactured using 25, 50, 75 and 100 per cent date syrup…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory properties and chemical composition of corn and sorghum flakes manufactured using 25, 50, 75 and 100 per cent date syrup (DS), instead of sugar.

Design/methodology/approach

Ten individuals assessed the overall acceptability, taste, texture and aroma of flakes. The chemical composition of each type of flake was determined, and these characteristics compared with those of control corn and sorghum flakes (without DS).

Findings

The overall acceptability of sorghum flakes ranged from 6.3 (100 per cent DS flakes) to 6.8 (25 per cent DS flakes); however, the difference was not significant. Values for taste, texture and aroma of sorghum flakes ranged from 5.3 (taste of 100 per cent DS flakes) to 7.2 (texture of 25 per cent DS flakes). For corn flakes, values ranged from 6.20 (aroma of 100 per cent DS flakes) to 7.20 (texture of 25 per cent DS flakes). For both sorghum and corn, the colors of 25-100 per cent DS flakes were significantly different from controls (p = 0.0002). The total carbohydrate, fat, protein and ash contents were 81.669 per cent, 1.545 per cent, 13.27 per cent and 3.52 per cent for corn flour, and 83.38-85.78 per cent, 1.7-2.0 per cent, 10.02-12.13 per cent and 2.36-3.92 per cent for sorghum flour, respectively. The total carbohydrate, fat, protein and ash contents were 81.63 per cent, 5.75 per cent, 9.80 per cent and 2.82 per cent for corn, and 86.31-84.99 per cent, 3.15-4.27 per cent, 7.64-7.94 per cent and 2.92-2.79 per cent for sorghum flakes, respectively.

Originality/value

Corn and sorghum flakes produced with DS are acceptable to consumers, and their nutrient values indicate potential health benefits.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 48 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Vera Lúcia Valente Mesquita and Maria de Lourdes Reis Giada

In Brazil there is a lack of food composition data and the nutrition professionals frequently need to consult compiled tables of international reference. It is known that the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Brazil there is a lack of food composition data and the nutrition professionals frequently need to consult compiled tables of international reference. It is known that the extrapolation of international food data to the regional level is not accurate and requires caution because it may result in nutritional problems. Thus, the purpose of this work was to determine and compare the organic‐mineral content of the main Brazilian cereals and legumes with those of the available reference in this country.

Design/methodology/approach

The chemical composition of the samples was examined according to AOAC methods. The energy value for each sample was calculated using the specific Atwater energy factors.

Findings

The moisture as well as lipids and ash content were found to accord with the consulted bibliography for most of the samples. The protein values were the same as those found by some authors and different from others.

Originality/value

The results obtained showed the need for elaborating a Brazilian food composition table able to better reproduce the real nutritive value of food produced in this country.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

J.A. Ayo and I. Nkama

Acha (Digitaria exilis staph.) grain was purchased locally from Jos central market in Plateau State of Nigeria. The grain was washed, destoned, oven (cabinet)‐dried, dry milled…

589

Abstract

Acha (Digitaria exilis staph.) grain was purchased locally from Jos central market in Plateau State of Nigeria. The grain was washed, destoned, oven (cabinet)‐dried, dry milled, sieved and used as acha grain flour to substitute for wheat flour for the production of biscuit. The physical (spread ratio, break strength, weight) and sensory (colour, taste, odour, texture) qualities of the biscuit were determined. The spread ratio increases (5.95 to 7.33), while the bread strength decreases (1.97 to 1.49) with the increase in the acha grain flour percentage. The effects were generally significant at above 30 per cent substitution (p≤0.05).

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1980

Patricia Bews

A staple food is defined as a main element of a diet. It is determined by the climate, the level of technical development, the culture and social conditions of the country. How…

Abstract

A staple food is defined as a main element of a diet. It is determined by the climate, the level of technical development, the culture and social conditions of the country. How does the role of staple foods compare in such dissimilar countries as the United Kingdom and Uganda?

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 80 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2006

Faqir Muhammad Anjum, Muhammad Rauf, Muhammad Issa Khan and Shahzad Hussain

This study was designed to incorporate untreated and alkaline hydrogen peroxide treated wheat bran into wheat flour and to access the appropriate type of bran and its optimum…

625

Abstract

Purpose

This study was designed to incorporate untreated and alkaline hydrogen peroxide treated wheat bran into wheat flour and to access the appropriate type of bran and its optimum level of addition in flour, which may not affect quality but enhance the overall status of the fiber in the bakery products.

Design/methodology/approach

Composite flours prepared by replacing wheat flour with wheat bran both untreated and untreated at 5, 10, 15 and 20 per cent were subject to proximate analysis. Panel of judges evaluated cakes prepared from composite flours to access suitable level of substitution. Calorific value of the product prepared was also determined.

Findings

Statistical analysis of data obtained predicted that significant decrease in moisture and nitrogen free extracts (carbohydrates) contents of flours were found. On the other hand, protein, fiber and total ash of the flour increase with increasing level of replacement. Calorific value of the cakes decreases with increasing level of wheat bran addition. Wheat bran up to 20 per cent replacement was found acceptable by the panel of judges with maximum acceptability of cake with chocolate flavor.

Practical implications

wheat bran may be supplemented to bakery product in order to prepare high fiber products. Wheat bran contains higher amount of insoluble fiber which can help to reduce the blood cholesterol level.

Originality/value

Research conduct was unique one in its nature as effect of both untreated and alkaline hydrogen peroxide treated wheat bran was evaluated in the same study and suitable levels of addition for both were accessed.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2018

Jerzy Bochnia and Slawomir Blasiak

The purpose of this paper was to verify the possibility of applying differential calculus of incomplete order to describe relaxation of the material obtained using selective laser…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to verify the possibility of applying differential calculus of incomplete order to describe relaxation of the material obtained using selective laser sintering (SLS) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

The samples were made using the incremental technology for three print directions. Relaxation tests were conducted. The theoretical curves, which are the solution of the equation describing the five-parameter Maxwell-Wiechert model for derivatives in relation to the total time of complete order and fractional order, were adjusted to the obtained experimental curves.

Findings

The SLS technology creates new possibilities regarding modelling polymeric elements which might be applied as functional models (products). Therefore, it is necessary to conduct an in-depth study of their properties, including relaxation properties, which is associated with the necessity to use proper mathematical tools to describe those properties. The differential calculus of incomplete order was applied herein to describe the anisotropy of relaxation properties because of the print direction in relation to the relaxation curves adjusted with the five-parameter Maxwell-Wiechert model.

Research limitations/implications

As a result of the conducted considerations, the authors obtained the dependencies describing the anisotropy of relaxation properties with the use of coefficients alpha and beta, which stand for the derivative order of the differential equation, whereas coefficient kappa stands for the translation coefficient which is an innovative application of this type of mathematical apparatus.

Practical implications

The developed method might be applied to describe the anisotropy of a broader group of materials manufactured with the use of incremental technologies.

Originality/value

The application of the differential calculus of incomplete order to describe the anisotropy of the materials manufactured from polyamide powder using the SLS technology is a distinctive feature of this paper. A crucial cognitive element of the conducted research is the fact which confirms that the dynamic viscosity coefficients have the greatest impact on the anisotropy of material properties depending on the print directions.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2009

Neelam Khetarpaul and Rajni Goyal

The unleavened bread called chapatis in vernacular language is the staple food of the majority of North Indians, which is generally prepared from wheat flour. However, wheat flour…

1181

Abstract

Purpose

The unleavened bread called chapatis in vernacular language is the staple food of the majority of North Indians, which is generally prepared from wheat flour. However, wheat flour contains 8‐12 per cent protein and is limited in essential amino acid, so supplementation of partially defatted soy dhal, sorghum, rice, maize and pearl millet will help to improve the nutritional value of chapatis. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Wheat flour was supplemented with salt‐treated partially defatted soy dhal, sorghum, rice, maize and pearl millet (50:10:10:10:10:10). Different salt treatments were given to soy dhal so as to remove its typical beany flavour. Different flours were mixed with water to form dough followed by preparation of chapati on flat iron plates. These were further evaluated organoleptically by the panel of judges. On the basis of organoleptic evaluation the best combination was used for nutritional evaluation.

Findings

Organoleptic evaluation of developed chapatis indicated that they were acceptable in terms of various sensory parameters. Nutritional evaluation of unprocessed composite flour, wheat flour chapatis and composite flour chapatis revealed a significant increase in moisture and protein content and non‐significant difference in ash and crude fibre contents of composite flour chapatis when compared with unprocessed composite flour and wheat flour chapatis. Various processing methods, namely dough making and roasting involved in chapati making, significantly (p<0.05) reduced the phytic (11 per cent) and polyphenol (64 per cent) content of the developed chapati compared with unprocessed composite flour. As a result the protein and starch digestibility of the developed chapati was improved over the unprocessed composite flour.

Research limitations/implications

Further research is needed regarding the amino acid profile of the developed chapati.

Practical implications

Wheat flour should be supplemented with different cereals so as to improve the nutritional value.

Originality/value

The paper has significance in terms of improving the nutritional quality of the chapati without any extra input of time and energy.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 111 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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