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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the…

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Said Hallaq

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but…

Abstract

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but also to enrich his love of hereafter and for achieving (falah) or success by sacrificing part of his profit for the benefit of the Muslim society (according to the degree of faith he possesses). This study aims to answer the following question: How does care for the good of the society influence the Muslim firm decisions? The answer to that question has been answered by formulating an objective function of the Muslim firm and deriving the optimally necessary conditions for maximization.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

Article
Publication date: 19 October 2022

Yassmeen El Maohub, Natalie Rangelov and L. Suzanne Suggs

Islamophobia is a growing social problem that leads to the discrimination of Muslims. Using Group Conflict Theory and the Integrated Threat Theory as the theoretical…

Abstract

Purpose

Islamophobia is a growing social problem that leads to the discrimination of Muslims. Using Group Conflict Theory and the Integrated Threat Theory as the theoretical frameworks, this study aims to measure the presence of Islamophobia in the hiring practices of the most southern state of Switzerland.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental formative research study was conducted with employees. Based on CVs for two positions, back-office and front-office, candidates were selected for interviews and reasons were provided. Two variables were manipulated to represent the “Muslim appearance” on the CVs: the picture and the name. A content analysis of reasons was conducted in addition to descriptive statistics of survey responses.

Findings

A negative perception of Muslim candidates emerged from the answers with a clear difference between the two scenarios: candidates perceived to be Muslim were not rejected from the back-office position, but they were from the front-office position.

Social implications

Results demonstrate that hiring practices in Ticino Switzerland are, in some cases, based on a prejudicial attitude. As long as Muslims were “not seen as Muslims to the customers,” they were judged as acceptable for the job. This has implications for social marketing research and practice aimed to change this discrimination behavior. A next step could be to understand if it is fear of Muslims or fear of what the public might think of Muslims that cause the selection difference between the two jobs. Systems-wide and macro level social marketing research is well suited to investigate such problems and test solutions, in a local context, following the methodology used in this study.

Originality/value

A disturbing escalation of the phenomenon of Islamophobia has emerged across the globe. This paper examines a fundamental issue in equity and prosperity, which is equal opportunity for employment. Using experimental design, the authors find that discrimination exists in hiring practices, which is a problem that social marketing is well equipped to address.

Details

Journal of Social Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-6763

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2022

Aamir Jamal, Liza Lorenzetti, Swati Dhingra, Clive Baldwin and Heather Ganshorn

Our thematic analysis of the academic literature on Canadian Muslim Youth aims to identify and describe the factors which contribute to the construction of identity among…

Abstract

Purpose

Our thematic analysis of the academic literature on Canadian Muslim Youth aims to identify and describe the factors which contribute to the construction of identity among Muslim youth in Canada and make some research and policy recommendations to address this issue. In this review, we responded to the following questions: What is the current research evidence for Canadian Muslim Youth identity construction? What are the major themes included in the identified publications?

Design/methodology/approach

What does it mean to be a Muslim youth in Canada and how do Canadian Muslim youth negotiate and construct their identities in a globally polarized world? Using Arksey and O'Malley's framework (2005), a scoping review of empirical studies published between 2000 and 2021 was conducted to explore the diverse contexts that intersect in the creation of Canadian Muslim youth identity.

Findings

A thematic analysis of the literature identified five key themes: religiosity, racism and discrimination, parental influence, citizenship and gender that intersect in multiple ways to contribute to the construction of diverse and complex Muslim youth identities. The scoping review highlights a gap in community-based research and the need for a broader range of theoretical perspectives on Muslim youth identity construction, as well as culturally appropriate policies and social work practice models for positive youth development.

Originality/value

In contemporary Canadian culture, Muslim youth must negotiate and create their own exclusive identity, which justifies the context of what it means to be Canadian and Muslim at the same time. As highlighted in the literature, a number of tensions within the Canadian policy, between the policy and the Muslim tradition and within the Muslim community itself pose challenges in the identity development among Muslim youth. Therefore, It is critical for social work practitioners, researchers and policymakers to consider above mentioned socio-political and religious dimensions while designing, implementing and evaluating youth programs for Muslim communities.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Iddrisu Mohammed, Mahmoud Abdulai Mahmoud, Alexander Preko, Robert Hinson and Joseph G. Yeboah

This paper sought to examine the factors that influence intention to recommend, focussing on the extension of the theory of planned behaviour in halal tourism, with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sought to examine the factors that influence intention to recommend, focussing on the extension of the theory of planned behaviour in halal tourism, with additional instruments such as halal safety and security, and trustworthiness of halal information.

Design/methodology/approach

Guided by a quantitative approach, cross-sectional data were collected using 394 Muslim diaspora tourists. The analysis technique used in this study is the partial least square structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results suggest that halal planned behaviour may account for the intention to recommend. Halal attitude, subjective norm, halal image, halal value, halal safety and security, and trustworthiness of halal information positively and significantly affect intention to recommend.

Practical implications

Muslim diaspora tourists are identified to have halal planned behaviour on intention to recommend. Hence, destination managers and practitioners are suggested to develop proactive halal products and services that appeal to tourists' intention to recommend.

Originality/value

This study has developed two new constructs: halal safety and security, and the trustworthiness of halal information grounded on the theory of planned behaviour in halal tourism. Specifically, the focus is on Muslim diasporic tourists' perspective in a non-Islamic context.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 September 2022

Juliana Juliana, A. Jajang W. Mahri, Azkiya Rahmah Salsabilla, Mumuh Muhammad and Iman Sidik Nusannas

This study aims to investigate the relationship between destination image (DI), travel motivation, religiosity, Islamic attributes of destination and the Muslim

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship between destination image (DI), travel motivation, religiosity, Islamic attributes of destination and the Muslim millennial’s visiting intention to halal tourist attraction.

Design/methodology/approach

Using quantitative method, this study analyses responses to a questionnaire distributed to 200 respondents living in various province in Indonesia. To prove the hypothesis, the data collected are analysed using partial least square-structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

This study shows that there is significant relationship positively between travel motivation, religiosity, Islamic attributes of destination and Muslim millennials’ visiting intention to Lombok as halal tourist attraction. However, the DI shows insignificant impact on Muslim millennials’ visiting intention. The results confirm that travel motivation, religiosity and Islamic attributes of destination are highly important in encouraging the intention of Muslim millennials to visit halal tourist attraction.

Research limitations/implications

This study, however, has limitations. Firstly, the observation of this study is only aimed at Muslim millennials aged from 20 to 40 years. Secondly, the variables used in this study are only four variables.

Practical implications

To increase the visiting intention among Muslim millennials to halal tourism destination, the authorities should create and design the concept of halal tourism to attract Muslim millennials by considering the factors in this study. In addition, related parties need to improve halal infrastructure quality to boost halal tourism development. Indonesia is the biggest Muslim country in the world recently, the better promotion and campaign of halal tourism, the more Muslim millennials who are interested to visit halal tourism destination.

Originality/value

This study explores Muslim millennials’ visiting intention to halal tourist attraction in Indonesia. The study combines four important determinants affecting Muslim millennials to visit Lombok as one of the halal tourist attractions in Indonesia. In addition to that, literature explaining visiting intention in the context of prospective Muslim millennial is scarce.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Fazal Ur Rehman and Ali Zeb

This study aims to examine the impact of social advertising (informative, entertainment, credibility, ease of use, privacy and contents) on the buying behavior of Muslim

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of social advertising (informative, entertainment, credibility, ease of use, privacy and contents) on the buying behavior of Muslim consumers toward the fashion clothing brands during the Holy Month of Ramadan along with the moderating role of brand image. Precisely, it focuses on the marketing techniques and strategies in social advertising to enhance buying behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the convenience sampling technique, data was collected from 304 Muslim consumers during the Holy Month of Ramadan. Questionnaires were self-administered, and data was analyzed via Smart partial least square structural equation modeling.

Findings

Social advertising (informative, entertainment, credibility, privacy, ease of use, contents) and brand image have a positive relationship with the buying behavior of Muslim consumers toward the fashion clothing brands during the Holy Month of Ramadan, while the brand image has nonmoderating effects. Furthermore, social advertising has a positive and significant relationship with the brand image.

Research limitations/implications

This study is only limited to fashion clothing brands in the Malaysian Muslim community and is based only on the few dimensions of the theory of reasoned action and technology acceptance model (TAM).

Practical implications

Results clarified the impact of social advertising and brand image on the buying behavior of Muslim consumers toward the fashion clothing brands during the Holy Month of Ramadan and the moderating role of brand image in achieving the business objectives.

Originality/value

This study has evaluated the effects of social advertising and brand image in enhancing the buying behavior of Muslim consumers during the Holy Month of Ramadan toward the fashion clothing brands along with the moderating role of brand image based on the theory of reasoned action and TAM model. Precisely, this study examined the unique characteristics of social advertising and the relative importance of informative, entertainment, credibility, ease of use, privacy and content in enhancing the buying behavior of Muslim consumers during the Holy Month of Ramadan, where consumers are emotionally involved in buying fashion clothing brands due to Eid al Fitr celebration.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Samreen Ashraf, Asmah Mansur Williams and Jeff Bray

The Muslim population is growing at twice the non-Muslim rate and forecast to represent over 25% of the global population by 2030. The Muslim fashion market is predicted…

Abstract

Purpose

The Muslim population is growing at twice the non-Muslim rate and forecast to represent over 25% of the global population by 2030. The Muslim fashion market is predicted to be worth $311bn globally by 2024. This market is currently not well understood or served. This study aims to present new insights into the fashion consumption opinions, attitudes and behaviours of female Muslim consumers through the lens of consumer culture focusing on Muslim identity.

Design/methodology/approach

An inductive qualitative method was adopted comprising 23 in-depth semi-structured interviews from respondents of seven ethnicities residing in the UK. Data were coded using a thematic approach.

Findings

Findings highlight the effect of Muslim identity on fashion consumption. Data demonstrates the importance of fashion for Muslim women despite the potential conflict between Islamic principles and public image. Respondents were conscious that their fashion behaviours were consistent with their identity; however, concerns were raised around limited choice and availability. Religiosity and family context/background were highlighted as key influences.

Social implications

Findings provide clear guidance, enabling fashion brands to most effectively serve this substantial and rapidly growing market. It is important that Muslim women are able to engage fully with fashion trends, satisfying their will to fit in with both their religion and their wider community.

Originality/value

This qualitative research provides depth of understanding of consumer motivations and attitudes and a multi-ethnic perspective which is lacking from previous studies that have adopted quantitative and single nationality approaches.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 October 2019

Following recent terrorist attacks in the US and Europe, Western Muslims have been criticised for not taking a firm stand against radical Islam and extremist…

Abstract

Following recent terrorist attacks in the US and Europe, Western Muslims have been criticised for not taking a firm stand against radical Islam and extremist organisations. Drawing on insights from narrative criminology, we challenge such assertions and reveal Muslims' narrative mobilisation against violent jihadism. Based on 90 qualitative interviews with young Muslims in Norway, we show how violent extremism is rejected in a multitude of ways. This narrative resistance includes criticising extremist jihadist organisations for false interpretations of Islam and using derogatory terms to describe them. It also includes less obvious forms of narrative resistance, such as humour and attempts to silence jihadist organisations by ignoring them. While narrative criminology has effectively analysed the stories that constitute harm, less attention has been paid to narratives that counter harm. We argue that stories that counter jihadi narratives are crucial to understand the narrative struggles of Muslim communities, whose outcomes can help determine why some individuals end up becoming religious extremists – while others do not. By distinguishing between factual, emotional and humorous counternarratives and describing silence as a form of resistance, we show resistance to extremism that is often concealed from the public and the state.

Details

The Emerald Handbook of Narrative Criminology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-006-6

Keywords

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