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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Mohd Anuar Ramli, Muhamad Afiq Abd Razak and Mohamad Hasif Jaafar

To tap into the global market, it is important to evaluate and predict the trends of the acceptance of non-Muslims towards halal food products. This review paper aimed to…

Abstract

Purpose

To tap into the global market, it is important to evaluate and predict the trends of the acceptance of non-Muslims towards halal food products. This review paper aimed to evaluate the evidence relating to the potential barriers to the acceptance of halal food among non-Muslim consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors searched ScienceDirect, Scopus, Emerald and JSTOR databases. The search for the studies was performed without restrictions by using the terms “Non-Muslim” OR “Jews” OR “Christian” OR “Hindu” OR “Buddha” AND “halal” OR “halalan toyyiban” OR “sharia compliance” AND “food” OR “dietary” AND “perception” OR “opinion” OR “attitude” OR “barrier”. Quantitative studies were included, and the quality of the studies was assessed with the Crowe Critical Appraisal Tool.

Findings

Two themes were identified to be the potential barriers in the acceptance of halal food among non-Muslim consumers. There were two major factors: weak intention (negative attitude, perceived low behavioural control and perceived low subjective norms) and lack of food safety awareness, whereas the minor factors were as follows: perceived low food quality, halal logo/brand, lack of halal awareness, religious belief, animal welfare, consumer motive, low confidence level, lack of proper marketing/promotion, bad cognitive dissonance, bad food assurance and poor product judgement.

Practical implications

By realising these potential barriers, it will benefit many parties including stakeholders and the food industry to improve their strategy to expand the halal market, especially for non-Muslims.

Originality/value

Based on the findings, the authors believe that while research towards halal needs to continue and improve its basis in theory and design, researchers and food marketers can be confident that intention of purchasing halal food products can be increased by securing the aspect of attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioural control as well as food safety awareness. Based on the identification of these potential barriers, this review hopes to further explain effective methods of communication for conveying halal concept in different parts of the countries.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Golnaz Rezai, Zainalabidin Mohamed and Mad Nasir Shamsudin

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to determine the factors that most likely influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles in a country where almost 60 percent of the population is Muslim.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross‐sectional data were collected through a survey of 800 non‐Muslims in the Klang Valley, via structured questionnaires, to gather information on their understanding of Halal principles and food products. The logit model was applied to determine the extent to which socio environment factors influenced the respondents' understanding and familiarities with Halal principles and Halal food products.

Findings

The results of this study suggest that non‐Muslim consumers are aware of the existence of Halal food in Malaysia. In general, socio‐environmental factors such as mixing with Muslims socially and the presence of advertised Halal food significantly influence non‐Muslims' understanding of Halal principles. The findings also suggest that non‐Muslims understand that Halal principles are also concerned about food safety issues and environmentally friendly ways of doing things.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a quantitative method to analyse 800 non‐Muslim respondents in the Klang Valley only.

Practical implications

The practical implications extend to food policy decision makers and food marketers who might pursue strategies in their distribution and communication efforts which target the growing Halal food market segment among non‐Muslims. Dissemination of information plays an important role in making non‐Muslims improve their understanding of Halal principles.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to investigate the level of understanding of Halal principles among non‐Muslims in Malaysia.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

M.M. Metwally

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the…

Abstract

Introduction Although there is no Muslim country, at present, which can be called an Islamic economy, in the sense of following, in a strict fashion, the teachings of the Qur'an, the traditions of Prophet Muhammad and the practices of early Muslims, a majority of Muslim consumers would seem to hold to Islamic values and views regarding the disposal of their incomes. The aim of this paper is to throw some light on the effect of this behaviour on optimal consumption of a Muslim individual. The paper is divided into three sections. Section one briefly summarises the economic behaviour of a non‐religious (rational) consumer. Section two discusses the utility function of a Muslim consumer and highlights the differences between this function and that of a non‐Muslim consumer. Section three determines the conditions of optimum consumption of a Muslim consumer.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Said Hallaq

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but…

Abstract

In an Islamic environment, the behavior of the Muslim firm is different from that of the non‐Muslim. The Muslim firm ultimate objective is not only to maximize profit but also to enrich his love of hereafter and for achieving (falah) or success by sacrificing part of his profit for the benefit of the Muslim society (according to the degree of faith he possesses). This study aims to answer the following question: How does care for the good of the society influence the Muslim firm decisions? The answer to that question has been answered by formulating an objective function of the Muslim firm and deriving the optimally necessary conditions for maximization.

Details

Humanomics, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0828-8666

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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2021

Nermain Al-Issa and Nathalie Dens

This study aims to understand the impact of religiosity and acculturation to the global consumer culture (AGCC) on Muslims’ perception of luxury values. Prior results on…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand the impact of religiosity and acculturation to the global consumer culture (AGCC) on Muslims’ perception of luxury values. Prior results on the effect of religion/religiosity on luxury consumption and purchase intentions are inconsistent. Then, while AGCC is argued to affect consumers’ perceptions of luxury values, research in this area is scarce.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an online questionnaire with 300 Kuwaiti respondents recruited from a paid consumer panel, the authors explore the relations between religiosity and AGGC on the one hand and luxury values on the other through linear regressions.

Findings

Religiosity enhances the perceived extended self, perfectionism, materialistic and sustainable value of luxury. AGCC enhances Muslims’ perception of all luxury values under study. Globalized Muslims mainly perceive luxury as means of self-identification.

Originality/value

The study is the first, to the knowledge, to investigate the impact of religiosity and AGCC on Muslims’ perception of luxury values. The authors propose an integrative set of luxury values that reflect both the social and personal value of luxury. The study focuses on Muslims in Kuwait; a potential luxury market that is under-investigated.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2021

Anubha

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of attitude as a mediator in exploring the Halal cosmetics purchase intention of Indian Muslim women. Various drivers of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the role of attitude as a mediator in exploring the Halal cosmetics purchase intention of Indian Muslim women. Various drivers of electronic word of mouth (eWOM) (quality, quantity, consistency and quantity) have been tested as antecedents of purchase intention through the lenses of the elaboration likelihood model (ELM).

Design/methodology/approach

The positivist paradigm approach has been used to test the proposed mediation model using structural equation modelling. Responses of 313 Indian Muslim women who read reviews shared on various social media platforms before making any halal cosmetics purchase intention have been used for the final analysis. Mediation was tested using bootstrapping.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that attitude towards halal cosmetics mediates the relationships of various drivers of eWOM with halal cosmetics purchase intention. However, it was observed that this mediation was partial in the context of eWOM quality, eWOM valence and eWOM consistency. Furthermore, for eWOM quantity, the mediation effect was full as the direct impact of eWOM quality on halal cosmetics purchase intention was not significant but its indirect impact on the latter via attitude was found to be significant.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the marketing communication literature, especially in the context of eWOM. The study also validates ELM theory in explaining the attitude that shapes the halal cosmetics purchase intention, thus the current study enriches the ELM literature.

Practical implications

The current study offers several implications for halal cosmetics marketers. It offers various suggestions to them on how to capitalize on eWOM as it influences Indian Muslim women’s purchasing intention for halal cosmetics by shaping their attitude towards such cosmetics favourably.

Originality/value

With reference to halal cosmetics, the current study offers a new perspective by examining the purchasing intention for such cosmetics based on various drivers of eWOM. The attitude towards halal cosmetics as a mediator has helped in better explaining the purchase intention for halal cosmetics.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2021

Muhammad Khalilur Rahman, Md Sohel Rana, Mohd Nazari Ismail, Mohd Zulkifli Muhammad, Muhammad Nazmul Hoque and Md. Abdul Jalil

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study…

Abstract

Purpose

Tourists often travel to different tourism destinations in advancing the knowledge of diverse cultures, environments, history and social aspects. The purpose of this study is to explore tourists’ perception of halal tourism and its impact on word-of-mouth towards halal tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative research approach was applied in this study. Data were collected via 375 survey questionnaires and were analysed using partial least square method. Data were collected from Malaysia’s capital city and tourist spots in Kuala Lumpur, the administrative capital city in Putrajaya, and several cities in Selangor, the richest state in the country.

Findings

The findings revealed that trip quality has a higher significant impact on satisfaction and trip value. The perception of a halal tourism destination is found to have a significant influence on satisfaction and trip value. Trip value is significantly related to satisfaction but not associated with word-of-mouth (WOM). Satisfaction of tourists has a significant impact on WOM towards travel destinations.

Research limitations/implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and its significant influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism. The results of this study provide useful insights for Malaysia’s tourism industry, particularly for the tourism marketing in Kuala Lumpur and Putrajaya cities as tourist destinations.

Practical implications

This study comes up with a novel understanding of the theory of tourism practices by estimating non-Muslim tourists’ perception and the influence of WOM towards tourism destinations. The results of this study are significant to industry practitioners, policymakers and marketers in promoting halal tourism.

Originality/value

This study examined the potential impact of non-Muslim tourists’ perception of halal tourism destinations and their WOM for halal tourism destinations.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2021

Mohamed Fawzi Afifi, Asad Mohsin and Mustafa Farouk

The study investigates perceptions and debate that are linked to the relationship between religion, alcohol, tourism and hospitality within the context of an Islamic…

Abstract

Purpose

The study investigates perceptions and debate that are linked to the relationship between religion, alcohol, tourism and hospitality within the context of an Islamic tourist destination. An analytical approach involving a review of literature, assessment of conservationists’ attitude representing Islam and Christianity, and current trends using a student sample to determine intentions is used. The study findings suggest that alcohol and religiosity are not compatible, use, abuse and dependency are more common among non-believers than believers. A tense dispute continues in the Arab World around alcohol. The study contributes to the literature by highlighting economics, social practice, theoretical and managerial implications related to alcohol service in Egypt and suggests a way forward for global Muslim staff working in the hospitality, tourism, and travel industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an analytical approach involving a review of literature, assessment of conservationists’ attitude representing Islam and Christianity and current trends using a student sample to determine intentions.

Findings

The study findings suggest that alcohol and religiosity are not compatible, use, abuse and dependency are more common among non-believers than believers. A tense dispute continues in the Arab World around alcohol.

Research limitations/Implications

The study is assessing the relationship between religion, alcohol, hospitality and tourism within the context of Egypt, advances knowledge about halal tourism and hospitality by explicitly linking religious obligations and the implication on tourism. The findings should be used with caution considering the subjectivity of responses and the size of the sample.

Practical implications

The service/hospitality industry managers could be Muslims or non-Muslims representing major airlines, hotels and restaurants where alcohol is served by Muslim employees. These managers should consider avoiding the sale or serving of alcohol completely, and if not, they must not force their workers to serve alcohol if they chose not to.

Social implications

Faith-based (e.g. Muslims, Seventh Day Adventists and Mormons), ideological or ethically driven alternative services should be created for the staff concerned with alcohol service/consumption. Employment is to be provided to adherents of these faiths or ideologies as an alternative resort.

Details

Tourism Critiques: Practice and Theory, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2633-1225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 October 2021

Ali Mursid and Pandji Anoraga

The growing numbers of Muslims visiting halal destinations motivated this study to explore halal destination attributes and revisit intention. This study aims to…

Abstract

Purpose

The growing numbers of Muslims visiting halal destinations motivated this study to explore halal destination attributes and revisit intention. This study aims to investigate how halal destination attributes affect destination attractiveness. Hence, it identifies the influence of halal destination attributes on perceived value, including functional and emotional value. It also verifies the effect of destination attractiveness on both functional value and emotional value. Finally, this framework verifies the effect of functional value and emotional value on revisit intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collects data from visitors who have visited a halal destination located in three cities of Central Java Province in the past two years (2019–2020) using purposive sampling methods. A total of 314 respondents participated in this study and the data are analyzed by using structural equation modeling.

Findings

The result showed that halal destination attributes positively and significantly impact destination attractiveness. Moreover, halal destination attributes positively and significantly affect both functional and emotional value. Destination attractiveness positively and significantly affects functional value, as well as emotional value. Concerning the effect of functional value and emotional value on revisit intention, only emotional value positively and significantly affects revisit intention while functional value does not.

Originality/value

This study contributes to city tourism by elucidating halal destination attributes based on the means-ends theory. The results of this study reported the importance of halal destination attributes and the role of halal destination attractiveness and emotional value in enhancing Muslim travelers’ revisit intention to halal destination.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 July 2021

Siti Hasnah Hassan and Husna Ara

The desire to find a new look of expressing the Muslim identity in society has led to a renewal of Muslim women’s interest in fashion. This allows fashion players to make…

Abstract

Purpose

The desire to find a new look of expressing the Muslim identity in society has led to a renewal of Muslim women’s interest in fashion. This allows fashion players to make trendy clothing and expand their business to meet the rising needs of Muslim women. Thus, this study aims to explore the concept of hijab fashion from the perspective of Islamic clothing retailers in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this study were collected qualitatively using semi-structured interviews and analysed using a deductive thematic analysis.

Findings

This exploratory study describes hijab fashion as a representation of clothing for ideal contemporary Muslim women that enhances the beauty in Islamic outfits from the perspective of Islamic clothing retailers. Hijab fashion has emerged as a modern form of the modest dress code in accordance with Islamic guidelines representing the hijaber identity. It is not just a veil to cover the awrah but also represents the impression of fashionableness and modernity, reflecting the self-image, trendy style and personality representing the true ideal Muslim women, who are known as Muslimah.

Research limitations/implications

The sample and findings are based exclusively on the perception of retailers directly involved in Malaysia’s Islamic fashion business.

Practical implications

The findings from this study benefit the fashion retailers, Islamic fashion industry players and policymakers by highlighting the importance of providing appropriate products and services concerning the growth of Muslim consumer market and their spending behaviour.

Originality/value

The findings offer a new perspective on the nature of the phenomenon of hijaber fashion as a symbol of the modern Muslim woman from the viewpoint of Islamic fashion practitioners.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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