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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Abu Elnasr E. Sobaih, Caroline Ritchie and Eleri Jones

The Delphi technique is used to achieve consensus among experts and/or gain judgment on complex matters. This paper aims to discuss the classical Delphi and its advantages…

Abstract

Purpose

The Delphi technique is used to achieve consensus among experts and/or gain judgment on complex matters. This paper aims to discuss the classical Delphi and its advantages and disadvantages in qualitative research, particularly in hospitality.

Design/methodology/approach

The classical Delphi is characterized by the involvement of experts and its iterative nature. In an industry with high turnover and limited pools of specialist expertise this can lead to problems of attrition and management of the process. The paper presents two qualitative hospitality research case studies in which the classical Delphi is successfully modified to overcome its limitations.

Findings

Identifying potential problems early in the research process enables critical design decisions to be made. Case one used a parallel expert group with similar experience to develop a research instrument for a limited number of prestigious experts well‐acquainted with one another who might have reached specious consensus through channels not accessible to the researcher. Case two enabled the addition of new experts to an expert panel to overcome attrition in successive Delphi rounds.

Practical implications

Despite its growing popularity in social science, Delphi has rarely been used in qualitative hospitality research. The modifications suggested in this paper can enhance the robustness of the classical Delphi technique for qualitative hospitality research.

Originality/value

The paper shows how the classical Delphi technique can be successfully modified for use in qualitative hospitality research.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2017

Kenneth David Strang

The purpose of this paper is to engage African subject matter experts to assist with a needs assessment of international capacity building for developing countries in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to engage African subject matter experts to assist with a needs assessment of international capacity building for developing countries in Africa, to establish a prioritized list of capacity building keywords substantiated by a current literature review.

Design/methodology/approach

A pragmatic mixed-method research design was used which involved conducting literature reviews and applying a modified Delphi technique to determine future research needs. The credibility of these results was strengthened by selecting a Delphi subject matter expert panel from African countries including Benin, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, Ethiopia, Ivory Coast, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Madagascar, Cameroon, Congo, Burkina Faso, Eritrea, Algeria and Nigeria. Non-parametric statistical techniques were used to objectively analyze the qualitative data and prioritize the findings.

Findings

The results clearly identified seven literature keywords which could improve future African capacity building research (in order of highest importance first): Trade Union (regional economic integration), Governance, FDI, Emigration, Education, Economic (small business stimulation), and Brain Gain. Additional keywords surfaced in the literature related to these ones, namely healthcare and brain drain (emigrating academics and scholars).

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study should generalize to government and capacity building policy administrators in Africa as well as to other researchers and practitioners in this field. The use of a novel modified Delphi technique should also be of interest to other researchers.

Originality/value

The modified Delphi technique commenced with a knowledge sharing conference where pre-selected subject matter experts collaborated to define the initial scope of questions. Another novel aspect of the customized Delphi technique was that the subject matter experts were required to conduct a literature review to substantiate their responses to questions.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2020

Nick J. Reed, Natalie Wilson and Kathryn J. Hayes

A method to engage salient organisational stakeholders in identifying and ranking measures of healthcare improvement programs is described. The method is illustrated using…

Abstract

Purpose

A method to engage salient organisational stakeholders in identifying and ranking measures of healthcare improvement programs is described. The method is illustrated using Executive WalkRounds (EWRs) in a multi-site Australian Health District.

Design/methodology/approach

Subject matter experts (SMEs) conducted document analysis, identified potential EWRs measures, created driver diagrams and then eliminated weak measures. Next, a panel of executives skilled in EWRs ranked and ratified the potential measures using a modified Delphi technique.

Findings

EWRs measurement selection demonstrated the feasibility of the method. Of the total time to complete the method 79% was contributed by SMEs, 14% by administration personnel and 7% by executives. Document analysis revealed three main EWRs aims. Ten of 28 potential measures were eliminated by the SME review. After repeated Delphi rounds the executive panel achieved consensus (75% cut-off) on seven measures. One outcome, one process and one implementation fidelity metric were selected to measure and monitor the impact of EWRs in the health district.

Practical implications

Perceptions of weak relationships between measures and intended improvements can lead to practitioner scepticism. This work offers a structured method to combine the technical expertise of SMEs with the practical knowledge of healthcare staff in selecting improvement measures.

Originality/value

This research describes and demonstrates a novel method to systematically leverage formal and practical types of expertise to select measures that are strongly linked to local quality improvement goals. The method can be applied in diverse healthcare settings.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Jhon Wilder Zartha Sossa, William Halal and Raul Hernandez Zarta

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the Delphi method, its characteristics and current applications through an analysis of recent most-cited…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to review the literature on the Delphi method, its characteristics and current applications through an analysis of recent most-cited scientific papers, with an emphasis on three axes, namely, the number of rounds used, stakeholder participation relevance or only academic experts’ participation and the possibility of using indicators or techniques different from those related to descriptive statistics.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 57 papers were initially reviewed, 10 of them with a high citation rate. Then, an analysis was made of papers in Scopus for the period 2015-2018 published in the Technological Forecasting and Social Change Journal and in the Futures and Foresight Journal, which had the characteristic of displaying quartile Q1 or Q2 in Scimago in addition to being in Scopus.

Findings

Among the main results, the authors observe the tendency to use fewer rounds, a higher prevalence of stakeholder participation and not only academic experts but also the use of new types of modified Delphi such as real-time spatial Delphi, Delphi group, market Delphi, real-world Delphi and policy Delphi.

Originality/value

Among the conclusions, the possibility of using other indicators or complementary techniques to the descriptive statistics is highlighted such as number of justifications or comments between rounds, coefficients to quantify the competence or degree of expertise of the participants, measures of the perception of the expert on the usefulness of the presented feedback, graphs of the number of arguments according to the number of questions, the Wilcoxon Ranked Pairs Test, the k means, Kolmogorov–Simonov test and the Mann–Whitney U-test.

Details

foresight, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 14 July 2020

Vidyut Rajhans, Sumita Rege, Usman Memon and Amit Shinde

The purpose of this paper is to describe a participatory qualitative research project using the Delphi consensus technique aided by Internet technology for successful…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a participatory qualitative research project using the Delphi consensus technique aided by Internet technology for successful transition of academic endeavors during and the post COVID era. The study aimed to derive a holistic competency matrix for an optometry program for transformation of the program to competency-based education.

Design/methodology/approach

This study combined a scoping review of literature for developing a baseline competency framework, along with derivation of an E-Delphi consensus within a panel of diverse stakeholders to achieve the objective of plotting a detailed competency matrix.

Findings

The involvement of all stakeholders of educational system in Delphi study resulted in a valid and all-inclusive competency framework with 18 competency units and 97 competency elements. This framework provided a strong base for redesigning pedagogy and assessment methods during COVID-19 crisis.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the feasibility and utility of adopting a participatory approach during COVID-19 outbreak. The Delphi technique aided by Internet technology was employed to develop a competency-based curriculum.

Social implications

The paper narrates a suitable, feasible and scientific method for rapid transition in academia, following the restrictions and social distancing norms imposed during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Originality/value

Although there is good evidence for use of the Delphi technique in curriculum development, this paper adds value by focusing on a participatory approach in using it. The suggested method here shows ways to gain optimum scientific output with minimum resources in constrained situations such as COVID-19 crisis.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Edoghogho Ogbeifun, Charles Mbohwa and Jan-Harm C. Pretorius

There are latent fears that in a Delphi exercise, the opinions of participants might be impaired due to the proximity of other participants. However, the thoughtful…

Abstract

Purpose

There are latent fears that in a Delphi exercise, the opinions of participants might be impaired due to the proximity of other participants. However, the thoughtful selection of participants and effective communication during the process can guarantee the independence of the participants’ opinions. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The single site case study method was adopted and the participants for the Delphi exercise were chosen from the strategic and tactical levels of leadership. The professional, positional experience and responsibilities of the participants guaranteed the quality of their opinions.

Findings

Although some of the facilities management participants are from the same division, the data collected demonstrate the opinions of independent minds, thus guaranteeing that consensus was achieved without complicity.

Originality/value

The research shows that it is possible to achieve consensus of opinion in a Delphi exercise without complicity, even when the participants know each other. This can be achieved through the painstaking selection of appropriate participants, the skills of the research coordinator and transparent communication between the rounds and in the final report.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 66 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2008

Pi‐Fang Hsu and Bi‐Yu Chen

The purpose of this paper is to present a selection model that adopts several important criteria, enabling a durable goods franchiser to select franchisees that are most…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a selection model that adopts several important criteria, enabling a durable goods franchiser to select franchisees that are most appropriate.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires based on selection criteria are identified from modified Delphi Technique and then sent to experts and decision makers. Major criteria weights are analyzed using the analytic hierarchy process and entropy. Final weights are then determined using the compromised weighting method.

Findings

This study has demonstrated that the durable goods sector in Taiwan emphasizes the condition of a franchisee personal condition more than its store location, and our results further indicate that a franchiser should emphasize finance and business ability when selecting franchisees. Additionally, consumer purchasing power, individuals passing by and parking convenience are all important factors for selecting a franchisee.

Originality/value

Analysis results indicate that the proposed selection model enables a franchiser to select franchisees more reasonably by allowing them to operate effectively.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2012

Alexandros Paraskevas and Mark N.K. Saunders

This paper's aim is to critically review the use of Delphi techniques in qualitative research for utilising “expert” opinions and to explore through a detailed example how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper's aim is to critically review the use of Delphi techniques in qualitative research for utilising “expert” opinions and to explore through a detailed example how Policy Delphi can be used by hospitality researchers as an alternative to the more widely used Normative Delphi.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on the research methodology of a project that explored organisational crisis signals detection using Policy Delphi with a criterion sample comprising 16 senior hotel executives involved in crisis management.

Findings

The main methodological concerns regarding Delphi are the definition of consensus, the expertise of the panel, its lack of scientific rigour, and – due to its lack of uniformity – reliability and validity of findings. Policy Delphi by default addresses the first since it does not seek consensus and can, through its design and execution, address the remaining concerns.

Research limitations/implications

Carefully designed Policy Delphi can offer a powerful research tool for exploratory research in hospitality, particularly for development of policies and strategies within an organisation. Unlike Normative Delphi, it is not intended as a decision making tool, but rather as a tool to generate options and suggest alternative courses of action for consideration.

Originality/value

The paper presents a valuable research tool that has evaded the attention of many hospitality researchers offering an illustrative example of its use in exploratory research to deliver credible, transferable and confirmable findings.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Zuraidah Abd Manaf

The purpose of this study is to uncover the perceptions of information professionals with regards to the establishment of a National Digital Cultural Heritage Repository…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to uncover the perceptions of information professionals with regards to the establishment of a National Digital Cultural Heritage Repository Center (NDCHR) in Malaysia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a modified Delphi study to identify the factors that contribute towards the establishment of an NDCHR in Malaysia. A three‐round modified Delphi study was used in this study to obtain consensus among the experts with regards to the factors that contribute towards the establishment of the central repository.

Findings

The establishment of an NDCHR requires collaboration efforts among the different types of cultural institution in Malaysia. The aspiration of the establishment to improve accessibility, resource discovery, preservation and promotion of the nation's cultural heritage information would contribute toward restructuring some common grounds and thinking among the different types of cultural institutions with respect to effective approaches to managing and organising the nation's digital cultural heritage information.

Practical implications

Findings and discovery of the study are significant in providing a general framework to establish an NDCHR in Malaysia

Originality/value

The outcome of the study will contribute toward the establishment of a central repository for digital cultural heritage information in Malaysia.

Details

Library Review, vol. 57 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Sally Giles, Gary Cook, Michael Jones, Brian Todd, Margaret Mason and Kieran Walshe

The aim of this study was to develop a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events, which may act as a prompt for clinical incident reporting in trauma and…

Abstract

The aim of this study was to develop a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events, which may act as a prompt for clinical incident reporting in trauma and orthopaedics and to determine what healthcare professionals understand by the term adverse event. A modified Delphi process with healthcare professionals working in trauma and orthopaedics (242) in three NHS trusts was performed. The process involved initial brainstorming sessions, a two‐round Likert‐style postal questionnaire and final focus group discussion. The initial brainstorming sessions generated a list of 224 adverse events to be included in the first round of the postal questionnaire. They included 83 causes of adverse events, 36 health and safety related adverse events and 105 clinical adverse events. Following the second round questionnaire and focus group discussion, a final list of 20 adverse events was produced. There were variations between professional groups in terms of validity scoring of individual adverse events. Overall, medical staff gave a lower rating to the adverse events than the other two professional groups. There were also variations between professional groups in terms of response rates. The modified Delphi process proved to be a successful tool for generating a multi‐professionally agreed list of adverse events and for understanding what healthcare professionals understand by the term adverse event.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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