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Article

Holger Berg, Vesa Taatila and Christine Volkmann

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach and the model are based on a review of the prevalent theory and research on creativity.

Findings

The authors develop a process based approach and design and a four step model to teaching creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a framework from which exercises and interventions for teaching creativity may be derived on a scientific basis.

Practical implications

Practical implications regard teaching and conveying creativity to students.

Originality/value

The paper addresses scholars and practitioners concerned with research and teaching of creativity and innovation. It is to the authors' knowledge one of the first approaches that links theory and research of creativity to actual teaching efforts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Hongyi Sun

The education of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship (CIE) has attracted the attention of the Chinese Government and universities in the past years. The Chinese…

Abstract

Purpose

The education of creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship (CIE) has attracted the attention of the Chinese Government and universities in the past years. The Chinese Ministry of Education recently promulgated “the recommendation on promoting innovation and entrepreneurship education at universities”. However, there are still four basic questions about CIE education, namely, why to teach, what to teach, how to teach and who will teach. This paper aims to discuss the four basic questions and propose an integrated syllabus and a new teaching model.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes a 3‐3‐3 syllabus/curriculum framework and a 7P model for teaching CIE. The 3‐3‐3 curriculum covers three steps (i.e. creativity, innovation and entrepreneurship), three new outputs (i.e. new idea, new product and new business) and three training areas (i.e creative thinking in brain, hands‐on experiences in new product development and going to society for market research). The 7P model includes project, performance, process, problem, principle, practice and presentation.

Findings

The 3‐3‐3 syllabus and the 7P model provide a practical and operational method for planning and implementing the teaching of CIE in an integrated course or program. The syllabus and the teaching model have been assessed by hundreds of students in the past years with very satisfactory feedback.

Practical implications

The 3‐3‐3 curriculum and 7P model have been implemented at City University of Hong Kong for over ten years and were well accepted and welcomed by students. It will be promoted to more Chinese universities under a project sponsored by China Higher Education Association. A train‐the‐trainer program is also under consideration, with the aim to train more teachers for Chinese universities.

Originality/value

Education of CIE as a separate course is not new. However, how to integrate the three in one course or program is very new. The model reported in this paper is perhaps a contribution in integrating CIE in education.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

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Article

Mohd Zahari Ismail and Syed Zamberi Ahmad

The paper aims to empirically investigate the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship curriculum delivered in Malaysian polytechnics.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to empirically investigate the effectiveness of the entrepreneurship curriculum delivered in Malaysian polytechnics.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through survey questionnaires, in‐depth interviews, document reviews and focus group discussions. The respondents were drawn from Malaysian polytechnics – training director, centre managers, entrepreneurship instructors in the centre, and polytechnic students who were purposively selected.

Findings

The study identifies that the entrepreneurship curriculum in polytechnics is not effective. Students are not imbued with entrepreneurial knowledge, skills and attributes during their study. Teaching approaches appear to be inappropriate and polytechnic lecturers do not appear to have relevant entrepreneurial skills, knowledge or training.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was small to be wholly reliable for generalising the findings to a similar problem in other higher learning institutions. However, the insights gained are a crucial basis for further research and give some variables to be investigated on their significance in shaping entrepreneurship education, especially in a developing country like Malaysia.

Practical implications

The findings provide valuable insights for institutional, educators, and policy makers. Stakeholders could use this study to revisit the existing education system and to improve the teaching methodologies in the area of entrepreneurship education in the higher learning institutions.

Originality/value

This is one of the first comprehensive studies to explore how entrepreneurship education is delivered within Malaysian polytechnics.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

Content available
Article

Xanthippi Tsortanidou, Thanasis Daradoumis and Elena Barberá

This paper aims to present a novel pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with computational thinking (CT) and new media literacy skills at low-technology…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present a novel pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with computational thinking (CT) and new media literacy skills at low-technology, information-rich learning environments. As creativity, problem solving and collaboration are among the targeted skills in twenty-first century, this model promotes the acquisition of these skills towards a holistic development of students in primary and secondary school settings. In this direction, teaching students to think like a computer scientist, an economist, a physicist or an artist can be achieved through CT practices, as well as media arts practices. The interface between these practices is imagination, a fundamental concept in the model. Imaginative teaching methods, computer science unplugged approach and low-technology prototyping method are used to develop creativity, CT, collaboration and new media literacy skills in students. Furthermore, cognitive, emotional, physical and social abilities are fostered. Principles and guidelines for the implementation of the model in classrooms are provided by following the design thinking process as a methodological tool, and a real example implemented in a primary school classroom is described. The added value of this paper is that it proposes a pedagogical model that can serve as a pool of pedagogical approaches implemented in various disciplines and grades, as CT curriculum frameworks for K-6 are still in their infancy. Further research is needed to define the point at which unplugged approach should be replaced or even combined with plugged-in approach and how this proposed model can be enriched.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a pedagogical model that aims at bridging creativity with CT, collaboration and new media literacy skills.

Findings

The proposed model follows a pedagogy-driven approach rather a technology-driven one as the authors suggest its implementation in low-tech, information-rich learning environments without computers. The added value of this paper is that it proposes a novel pedagogical model that can serve as a pool of pedagogical approaches and as a framework implemented in various disciplines and grades. A CT curriculum framework for K-6 is an area of research that is still in its infancy (Angeli et al., 2016), so this model is intended to provide a holistic perspective over this area by focusing how to approach the convergence among CT, collaboration and creativity skills in practice rather than what to teach. Based on literature, the authors explained how multiple moments impact on CT, creativity and collaboration development and presented the linkages among them. Successful implementation of CT requires not only computer science and mathematics but also imaginative capacities involving innovation and curiosity (The College Board, 2012). It is necessary to understand the CT implications for teaching and learning beyond the traditional applications on computer science and mathematics (Kotsopoulos et al., 2017) and start paying more attention to CT implications on social sciences and non-cognitive skills. Though the presented example (case study) seems to exploit the proposed multiple moments model at optimal level, empirical evidence is needed to show its practical applicability in a variety of contexts and not only in primary school settings. Future studies can extend, enrich or even alter some of its elements through experimental applications on how all these macro/micromoments work in practice in terms of easiness in implementation, flexibility, social orientation and skills improvement.

Originality/value

The added value of this paper is that it joins learning theories, pedagogical methods and necessary skills acquisition in an integrated manner by proposing a pedagogical model that can orient activities and educational scenarios by giving principles and guidelines for teaching practice.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 120 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article

Keren Dali

The purpose of this paper is to call into question the most longstanding pedagogical practices in academia while analyzing their potential to foster student creativity and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to call into question the most longstanding pedagogical practices in academia while analyzing their potential to foster student creativity and innovation in the classroom. While some suggestions advanced in this paper may not have the same importance in other fields and disciplines, they are highly relevant in the applied, interdisciplinary, and very fast moving field of Library and Information Science (LIS).

Design/methodology/approach

Positioning creativity as a teachable skill and relying on the learner-centered pedagogy of Carl Rogers, the paper presents a model that can serve as a litmus test for the creative potential of graduate-level assignments in LIS programs. The model is called “Walls,” “Doors,” and “Fences” (WalDorF); these terms refer to specific statements in graduate assignment descriptions that are necessary (“Walls”); conducive to creative expression (“Doors”); or unjustifiably restrictive (“Fences”). The paper uses a sample assignment from a “Foundations of LIS” course to illustrate the model; it also provides several examples of the WalDorF model application in other LIS courses.

Findings

Using the WalDorF model, the paper revisits and challenges some of the most common pedagogical practices in graduate LIS teaching, including the prevalence of written papers as course assignments; the implications of equating “research” with an overview of secondary literature; the need for professors’ approvals of research topics; the meaning of the “quality of writing;” the imperative of “academic” writing as opposed to other types of writing; the word/page limit; the use of standardized reference styles; the class participation requirement; and the late assignment policies, among others.

Originality/value

The real change in education is foundational and goes beyond cosmetic improvements. If we want to develop learning experiences that tap into students’ creative potential, the very core of our approaches needs to be scrutinized and questioned, even the centuries-old staples of academic teaching. At the end of the day, we may decide that changing things is not in the best interests of learning. However, a complete critical analytical work must be done to convince and reassure ourselves that tried-and-true methods are the best way to go. The proposed WalDorF model presents one possible frame for critical revision.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 73 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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Article

Ruan Li

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first century is the society of information technology and knowledge-based economy. To cope with the information society, teaching methods would be changed. Traditional chalk and talk can no longer adapt to the changing society. In addition to passing down the tradition, new ideas should also be introduced. In the informational age, the internet becomes an essential living element and synchronous Web-based teaching breaks through the obstacle of space, provides instant and multiple communication channels and creates alternative creativity learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

With experimental design, totally, 208 students in Fujian University of Technology, as the research objects, were led to a 15-week (3 hours per week for total 45 hours) experimental teaching. The study uses analysis of variance for discussing the effect of synchronous Web-based teaching on art students’ creativity and further understanding the effect of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of synchronous Web-based teaching on creativity, visually creative teaching on creativity and the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on the promotion of creativity.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample size taken in this study was not large enough to fully reflect the results of the study. The survey sample didn’t cover all the major cities in China, which had a small coverage and couldn’t reflect the research situation of the whole country. Second, the evaluation criteria for artistic students’ creativity were too broad. More specific evaluation rules should be set and the creativity standards should be graded to better guide the implementation of art courses and the cultivation of students’ creativity.

Practical implications

The synchronous Web-based learning environment provides favorable individual thinking space to effectively reduce disturbance among classmates. Synchronous Web-based teaching shares sound, pictures and even films with each other to enrich the learning media. What is more, teachers would be more convenient and fast to deal with materials or handouts or rapidly updating materials and avoiding the loss of handouts.

Originality/value

This paper studied the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity, which was a meaningful and innovative topic. And this study can provide more enlightenment and reference for future education.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article

Latisha Reynolds, Samantha McClellan, Susan Finley, George Martinez and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight recent resources on information literacy (IL) and library instruction, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and IL published in 2015.

Findings

This paper provides information about each source, describes the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain either unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and IL.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article

Simeon Spiteri and Felix Maringe

This study addresses the issue of teaching in entrepreneurship courses in selected European universities in Malta and the UK. The paper aims to explore the views of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study addresses the issue of teaching in entrepreneurship courses in selected European universities in Malta and the UK. The paper aims to explore the views of students in different educational institutions about their understanding of entrepreneurship and the pedagogical aspects of teaching it.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative case study data were collected through one-to-one interviews with 31 students engaged in entrepreneurship course in four educational institutions in Malta and the UK.

Findings

Students identified four essential components that reflect the nature of entrepreneurial education. These consist of pedagogy, content, assessment and role model lecturer. Pedagogy of entrepreneurial courses was broadly seen as a mixture of traditional teaching and entrepreneurial learning. Students showed a preference for content aimed at developing creativity in practice-based situations. Preferred assessment strategies included individual assignments perceived as useful to deepen the concepts learned and stimulate individual thinking. Role model lecturers are inspiring to students. They should be individuals that are creative, have experience in entrepreneurial roles and hold academic knowledge that is useful to teach about entrepreneurship. There were variations in the views expressed by different groups of students interviewed in this study.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the relatively small sample sizes, this study has limited generalisability implying the need for similar research more broadly across other universities in Europe.

Practical implications

The study proposes a model for enhancing the teaching of entrepreneurial courses in universities in Europe. The model comprises teaching pedagogies responsive to the student learning needs; application of features present in the KTP model and proposes a structure for determining worthwhile knowledge that should be delivered in adherence to students learning needs.

Originality/value

This study expands the understanding of the learning process of students and provides a methodological framework that can be used to research entrepreneurial education.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

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Book part

Richard Tunstall, Lenita Nieminen, Lin Jing and Rasmus Hjorth

Educators are increasingly required to develop creativity and entrepreneurial capabilities amongst students, yet within the fields of entrepreneurship and innovation these…

Abstract

Purpose

Educators are increasingly required to develop creativity and entrepreneurial capabilities amongst students, yet within the fields of entrepreneurship and innovation these are presented as separate processes. We explore the theoretical and conceptual similarities and differences between these processes, and relate this to a range of experiential and digitally enhanced learning activities in formal education settings.

Methodology/approach

We present a conceptual model of the iterative nature of creativity and entrepreneurship as separate cognitive and social processes leading to aesthetic or sense-making outcomes. This leads to a discussion of how these processes may be experienced by students within an educational setting.

Findings

We propose a framework of learning activities which support the development of creativity through teaching entrepreneurially, at primary, secondary, and tertiary education levels. A range of different approaches is critically evaluated according to their relevance, including business planning, simulations, roleplay, co-creation, and flashmobs. Flashmobs are proposed to be most suitable and an outline learning activity design is mapped in detail against creative and entrepreneurial processes.

Research and Practical implications

This chapter supports educational practice and research on learning through entrepreneurship in allowing educators and researchers to evaluate how learning activities may directly contribute to students’ learning through experience and the development of their creative and entrepreneurial mind-set.

Originality/value

This chapter is of value to educators as it explains how creative and entrepreneurial processes may be experienced by students through different forms of learning activity. It is of further value to research on entrepreneurial learning in considering how the creative process may inform entrepreneurial action.

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