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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Ruan Li

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first century is the society of information technology and knowledge-based economy. To cope with the information society, teaching methods would be changed. Traditional chalk and talk can no longer adapt to the changing society. In addition to passing down the tradition, new ideas should also be introduced. In the informational age, the internet becomes an essential living element and synchronous Web-based teaching breaks through the obstacle of space, provides instant and multiple communication channels and creates alternative creativity learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

With experimental design, totally, 208 students in Fujian University of Technology, as the research objects, were led to a 15-week (3 hours per week for total 45 hours) experimental teaching. The study uses analysis of variance for discussing the effect of synchronous Web-based teaching on art students’ creativity and further understanding the effect of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of synchronous Web-based teaching on creativity, visually creative teaching on creativity and the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on the promotion of creativity.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample size taken in this study was not large enough to fully reflect the results of the study. The survey sample didn’t cover all the major cities in China, which had a small coverage and couldn’t reflect the research situation of the whole country. Second, the evaluation criteria for artistic students’ creativity were too broad. More specific evaluation rules should be set and the creativity standards should be graded to better guide the implementation of art courses and the cultivation of students’ creativity.

Practical implications

The synchronous Web-based learning environment provides favorable individual thinking space to effectively reduce disturbance among classmates. Synchronous Web-based teaching shares sound, pictures and even films with each other to enrich the learning media. What is more, teachers would be more convenient and fast to deal with materials or handouts or rapidly updating materials and avoiding the loss of handouts.

Originality/value

This paper studied the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity, which was a meaningful and innovative topic. And this study can provide more enlightenment and reference for future education.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Vicki L. Gregory

Web‐based distance education is rapidly vying to become one of the preferred norms for teaching in many library and information science programs, especially in the USA…

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1425

Abstract

Web‐based distance education is rapidly vying to become one of the preferred norms for teaching in many library and information science programs, especially in the USA. Within the distance education paradigm, courses taught utilizing the Web may be classified as either totally asynchronous, or synchronous when there are provisions, to a greater or lesser degree, for “real‐time” interaction, such as by means of Internet chat or a limited number of face‐to‐face classes. The results of this study show that, although library and information science students in Web‐based distance education course environments remain generally satisfied with the quality of the instruction and education that they are receiving through courses with significant Web‐based content, it is nevertheless clear that they have generally come to perceive that the quality of their educational experience is significantly improved when there is included within or as an integral part of the course offering some meaningful level of real‐time interaction.

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New Library World, vol. 104 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Chia-Chen Chen, Carmen Cámara, Kuo-Lun Hsiao, Tien-Yu Hsu and Arun Kumar Sangaiah

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383

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2017

Fei-Fei Cheng, Chui-Chen Chiu, Chin-Shan Wu and Der-Chian Tsaih

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of user’s learning style (including accommodators, divergers, convergers, and assimilators) on user’s satisfaction…

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1469

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of user’s learning style (including accommodators, divergers, convergers, and assimilators) on user’s satisfaction on the web-based learning system and their learning effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

This experimental research used the college students from a technology institute in Taiwan as the subject sources. By using the Kolb’s learning style model, the students are classified as four types of learners: convergers, divergers, assimilators, and accommodators. The authors analyzed the relationships among the different learning styles with their effectiveness of learning and satisfaction of using the web-based learning system. The mediation effect of gender is also presented.

Findings

This research indicates that: first, the satisfaction of the web-based learning system has significant influence on the learning performance of learners; second, different learning styles learners have no significant effect to the satisfaction on using the web-based learning system; third, learning effectiveness has significant difference among different learning style learners on the web-based learning system; the learning effectiveness of accommodators and divergers was significantly higher than the assimilators; fourth, different learning styles learners show significant difference in gender proportion. In addition to accommodators, whose proportion of women is higher than men, the other three learning styles’ proportions in men are higher than women.

Research limitations/implications

This study was grounded in the Kolb’s learning style theory. The authors provide implications for academic studies in e-learning research stream that aimed at understanding the role of learning style as well as gender differences in the asynchronous web-based learning system.

Practical implications

Results from this study provided the implications for students, educators, and e-learning system designers. The design of teaching materials as well as functions of e-learning systems should take learners’ learning style into consideration to ensure the best learning outcome.

Originality/value

This study examined the students’ learning style as well as gender differences in the asynchronous web-based learning system. An experiment was conducted to ensure the data were collected in a controlled environment, thus, offer the value that most of the prior study lacks.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Ying Liu, Fuzong Lin and Xue Wang

Tertiary institutions are increasingly providing Web‐based courses to learners both on‐campus and off‐campus, enabling more students to take these courses and get the most…

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1252

Abstract

Tertiary institutions are increasingly providing Web‐based courses to learners both on‐campus and off‐campus, enabling more students to take these courses and get the most recent information. Students can also learn more interactively with the new types of instruction methods used online. Synchronous or asynchronous communication via computer networks can also greatly facilitate the learning process. In order to help the teachers and administrators of the Web‐based learning systems to improve the effectiveness of their instruction and design better online learning software, we have implemented an exploratory investigation of the behaviour of the students in the Web‐based learning environment. Multiple approaches were adopted to collect data, which included questionnaires, posted documents, online logs, interviews and observations. Comparison and analyses are also made between students in different semesters, and under different instruction methods. Some viewpoints on the construction of the Web‐based learning systems are proposed.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Mingzhuo Liu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to design a web‐based course in the context of China for self‐directed learning from four perspectives – i.e. pedagogical…

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1194

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how to design a web‐based course in the context of China for self‐directed learning from four perspectives – i.e. pedagogical, psychological, social and technological – and also to summarize the design principles for the web‐based course.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews literature related to: self‐directed learning, with a view to bringing out its capabilities and capacities for use in a web‐based environment; theories and pedagogies of learning with a view to imbuing them for the design of web‐based courses; and challenges of the design of web‐based courses with a view to gauging its acceptability.

Findings

The development of a successful web‐based course needs to focus on multiple perspectives — pedagogical, psychological, social and technological – in order to contextualize it for learner‐centeredness. The results show that the course designed based on these dimensions was flexible, useful and welcomed.

Originality/value

This paper describes a conceptual framework for designing a web‐based course from four perspectives and also presents a series of design principles for a web‐based course.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2004

Ileana Hamburg, Marion Hersh, Mihai Gavota and Miona Lazea

Internet technology and, in particular Web‐based services, have the potential to revolutionise approaches to learning. These new forms of learning could provide additional…

Abstract

Internet technology and, in particular Web‐based services, have the potential to revolutionise approaches to learning. These new forms of learning could provide additional educational opportunities for people with special needs to support their social integration and integration into the knowledge‐based economy. This paper starts with a short presentation on open Web‐based learning environments and knowledge forums followed by a discussion of some recent results on e‐learning and special needs users. Two examples of learning portals for supporting e‐learning forums developed within the European projects, EURO H 2000 and a DAAD German‐Romanian cooperation, are given. Ways of including users with special needs in projects on the design of learning materials and environments are also discussed.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Christos Fidas, Vasilios Kapsalis, Christos Tranoris and Nikolaos Avouris

The purpose of this paper is to present the design of a context‐aware service for synchronous support in web‐based educational systems.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the design of a context‐aware service for synchronous support in web‐based educational systems.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed service supports synchronous interaction among tutors and students, based on their current context, thus increasing the communication channels, the reasoning and the exchanging of ideas.

Findings

The proposed service introduced here gives additional value to distance learning educational systems, as it transforms the web from a medium primarily used for asynchronous communication into a synchronous one.

Originality/value

As educational institutes move their content online and open universities support lessons through the internet, services like the proposed one are of general value.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Kate Manuel

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit…

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1759

Abstract

Academic librarians have been creating Web‐based tutorials in support of their institutions’ distance education course and remote students for some time. For‐credit, distance education, information literacy classes for undergraduate students, however, have not yet begun to appear in significant numbers. In creating such a course, LIBY 3200, California State University, Hayward, sought to meet the needs of its students better and to explore the potential of distance education. Findings from experience teaching LIBY 3200 suggest that many students are less prepared to function – technologically and cognitively – in a Web‐based distance education environment than might be predicted. Design and delivery of course content proved time‐consuming, with few possibilities for short‐cuts, and teaching methods had to be adapted to help the students become autonomous learners, meaningfully capable of self‐directed learning in a Web‐based environment.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Mercedes Fisher and Derek E. Baird

Investigating the social structure in online courses helps in designing for and facilitating student support and retention. Aims to provide data showing how course design…

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6374

Abstract

Purpose

Investigating the social structure in online courses helps in designing for and facilitating student support and retention. Aims to provide data showing how course design and use of social software technologies provided social and collaborative learning opportunities for online students.

Design/methodology/approach

A study of computer‐mediated groups that utilized social media technologies and a web‐based collaborative model in an online program. Participants were put into groups and observed as they constructed knowledge using both online dialogue (synchronous and asynchronous) and social media technologies as tools to support their learning.

Findings

The integration of web‐based learning communities and collaborative group assignments into the course design has a positive influence on student retention in online courses.

Research limitations/implications

The research was limited to the online student population at Pepperdine University, and did not include data or research from similar online programs at other universities. Future research should include data collected from students outside the USA to find out what role cultural mores, attitudes, and gender play.

Practical implications

Provides curriculum design strategies that foster community, utilize social/ participatory media, and support online student learning and retention through effective course design.

Originality/value

Current research on distance learning curriculum has focused on the instructor's perspective. It is felt that research from the student's perspective can also yield some valuable insights for online course design.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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