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Book part
Publication date: 4 July 2019

Zinaida N. Kozenko, Yuri A. Kozenko, Konstantin Y. Kozenko and Galina N. Zvereva

The purpose of the chapter is to determine common regularities and peculiarities of the influence of the 2008 crisis on development of socio-economic systems in view of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the chapter is to determine common regularities and peculiarities of the influence of the 2008 crisis on development of socio-economic systems in view of developed and developing countries.

Methodology

The methodology of this research includes the developed author’s conceptual model of conflict of socio-economic system as an analog of the model of economic cycle. As crisis is a manifestation/example of economic conflict, this model could be used for studying it. Also, the method of comparative analysis is used for comparing the influence of the 2008 crisis on development of socio-economic systems from various categories. The objects of the research are selections of countries according to classification of the International Monetary Fund – leading developed countries (advanced economies) and emerging market and developing economies. The studied indicator is annual growth rate of GDP in constant prices.

Conclusions

Modeling and analysis of the influence of the 2008 crisis on development of socio-economic systems of developed and developing countries are performed, with crisis considered as a wave of economic cycle. Apart from common regularities of the 2008 crisis in socio-economic systems – vivid and short negative reaction and double wave of crisis – we determined peculiarities of influence of this crisis on economies of developed and developing countries. These peculiarities are connected to the fact that the 2008 crisis was deeper in developed countries than in developing countries, but the crisis was developing according to the optimistic scenario (long waves) and was overcome in 2012. In developed countries, the crisis was developing according to the pessimistic scenario (short waves), and negative reaction renewed in 2012, with another one expected in 2021.

Originality/value

It is substantiated that insufficiently intensive and successful management of crisis in developing countries will probably become a cause of increase of differentiation of countries in the global economic system, which is expressed in growth of underrun of developing countries from developed countries.

Details

“Conflict-Free” Socio-Economic Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-994-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 October 2008

Mahesh Chandra and James P. Neelankavil

Between the lack of incentives for larger international companies and the lack of resources of the local companies the majority of the people in less developed countries

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Abstract

Purpose

Between the lack of incentives for larger international companies and the lack of resources of the local companies the majority of the people in less developed countries never benefit from new products. International companies generally offer modified product offerings to consumers in developing countries. To date, their attempts to penetrate the developing country markets have not been successful. The reasons for this failure in their attempts to succeed in these markets include the prohibitive cost of developing entirely new products for this market and the low‐income levels of the families in these countries. To succeed in developing countries, international companies have to observe and study their customers' needs and uncover the problem areas. There are many approaches available to accomplish this process including systematic innovation and the seven R's. Each approach focuses on the consumer and suggests a radical approach to developing new products. The purpose of this paper is to provide an introduction and overview of new product development in emerging countries.

Design/methodology/approach

Challenges, process, and success strategies are explored.

Findings

To succeed in developing countries, international companies have to observe and study their customers' needs and uncover the problem areas. The authors suggest an approach that focuses on the consumer and suggests a radical approach to developing new products – the limitations/constraints point of view. The single biggest constraint in developing products for less developed countries is affordability (price). Unlike the new product development process that is practiced in industrialized countries, international companies wanting to be successful in less developed countries should start with the customers' affordability and value‐added point of view and then work backwards to develop products/services for these countries.

Practical implications

International companies are provided with an approach to new product development in emerging countries.

Originality/value

New product development in emerging countries is likely to become increasingly important, and there is very little research on the topic. The value of this paper is in its overview of the challenges of new product development in emerging countries, and suggested solutions.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Naresh K. Malhotra, Francis M. Ulgado, James Agarwal and Imad B. Baalbaki

Discusses and applies a general framework for services quality to make acomparative evaluation of ten dimensions of service quality betweendeveloped and developing

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Abstract

Discusses and applies a general framework for services quality to make a comparative evaluation of ten dimensions of service quality between developed and developing countries. Derives specific hypotheses for each of the service quality dimensions based on the relevant environmental factors characterizing developed and developing economies. Discusses managerial implications of the hypotheses that are derived, and proposes the empirical investigation of these hypotheses as a direction for future research.

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Mohammad Nurunnabi

The purpose of this study is to review a synthesis of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in developing countries in an attempt to provide…

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to review a synthesis of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) implementation in developing countries in an attempt to provide directions for future research. The in-depth analysis was performed with the use of the data analysis tool available in the Scopus databases. The study initially reviewed 145 papers and in particular 35 papers were analysed. Fifteen articles (43%) were published in seven journals including International Journal of Accounting, Critical Perspectives on Accounting, Advances in Accounting, International Journal of Accounting and Information Management, Asian Review of Accounting, Journal of Applied Accounting Research, and Asian Journal of Business and Accounting. Specifically, 89% citations were from 14 articles, but 9 (25%) articles were without any citations. Most of the studies focus on qualitative followed by quantitative, and very few studies were based on mixed methods. Researchers should focus on few areas for future research on IFRS implementation in developing countries including theory implications, policy prescriptions, and case of particular standard.

Details

International Financial Reporting Standards Implementation: A Global Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80117-440-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 October 2019

Mohamed Amal and Huaru Kang

The main objective of the present chapter is to address empirically the impacts of institutional distance (ID) on the multinationality level of firms from developing

Abstract

The main objective of the present chapter is to address empirically the impacts of institutional distance (ID) on the multinationality level of firms from developing countries and interpret how the interaction between ID and firm resources affects firms from developing countries. Using data of firms from developing countries, we estimated an empirical cross-section model. The results show that while cultural distance was not found statistically significant, ID, on the other hand, was statistically significant. The higher the distance between home and host country, the higher the multinationality of firms from developing countries. We also found a positive and statistically significant correlation between intangible resource and multinationality, which suggests a tendency toward new pattern in the internationalization of firms from emerging economies.

Details

International Business in a VUCA World: The Changing Role of States and Firms
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-256-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

P.R. Shukla

Fairness is central to any multilateral regime, that is, any agreement between multiple nation-states to address and resolve a common problem. Climate change mitigation is…

Abstract

Fairness is central to any multilateral regime, that is, any agreement between multiple nation-states to address and resolve a common problem. Climate change mitigation is among the key global environmental concerns that will require a common agenda, approach, and set of actions by the community of nations. To that end, global climate negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC, 1992) are centered on establishing a multilateral framework to control greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from all nations and to help those who would be affected by climate change.

Details

Perspectives on Climate Change: Science, Economics, Politics, Ethics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-271-9

Book part
Publication date: 9 March 2021

Debabrata Mukhopadhyay and Dipankar Das

This study intends to explore the impact of World Trade Organization (WTO) which came into existence from January 1, 1995, on the export share of developing counties in…

Abstract

This study intends to explore the impact of World Trade Organization (WTO) which came into existence from January 1, 1995, on the export share of developing counties in the world exports of all goods together in US$, that is, in global merchandise trade. This study endogenously determines the structural break in changing export share of developing countries and how are they related to the major changes in the multilateral trading systems of international trade, in particular, the introduction of the WTO by following a multiple breakpoint analysis due to Bai–­Perron. In this context, it would be worthwhile to note that the shift toward more export-oriented strategies by a large number of developing countries has accelerated the growth of LDC exports. This study also compares the changing share of merchandise exports and trade in commercial ­services for developing countries and the LDCs in the Post-WTO regime. The ­authors follow a univariate time-series exploratory analysis to understand the trend in world export shares of all goods and commercial services for different regions of the developing world and demonstrate the potential of these regions in the expansion of trade. The study, while evaluating the impact of WTO in changing export share in terms of structural change analysis, enables us to understand the role tariff cut in the developed countries on the imports from developing countries. This study also observes increasing inequality in terms of export share among different regions of the developing world.

Details

Global Tariff War: Economic, Political and Social Implications
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-314-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Shirish C Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to identify the four principles for firms in developing countries to enhance and augment their innovation agenda for staying competitive. With…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the four principles for firms in developing countries to enhance and augment their innovation agenda for staying competitive. With increasing globalization, firms need to continually calibrate and realign their innovation strategies to remain competitive. Although many firms in the developed countries are making sustained efforts to adopt the developing world perspective on innovation, similar efforts by firms in developing countries to reorient their innovation strategies to the developed world are minimal. In the long run, this might erode the competitiveness of firms in developing countries. Leveraging the global innovation strategy framework, the paper suggests four principles that can help developing country firms transition from a local to a global innovation strategy. Specifically, the paper exhorts developing country firms to move from a “good-enough” innovation approach to an “augmented” innovation philosophy that aims to serve the latent needs of the users. The four principles suggested for the developing country firms to further their innovation agenda are: invest in research; learn to fail; be patient; and alliance and acquire.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses prior literature and frameworks to identify the four principles that firms in developing countries should follow for furthering their innovation agenda with a view to becoming global in their approach.

Findings

The four principles suggested for the developing country firms to further their innovation agenda are: invest in research; learn to fail; be patient; and alliance and acquire.

Originality/value

The paper identifies the four principles for firms in developing countries to enhance and augment their innovation agenda for staying competitive.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Ahmed Salman

This paper identifies key hurdles to implementing e‐commerce and information technology in developing countries with special focus on three crucial vectors of an…

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Abstract

This paper identifies key hurdles to implementing e‐commerce and information technology in developing countries with special focus on three crucial vectors of an organization – people, process, and technology. Since it is imperative to switch to an e‐commerce model from the traditional business one, this paper examines essential ingredients of re‐engineering and uncovers various hidden impediments prevailing in a typical organisation of developing countries. Extensive online research with comparative analysis, a venture to launch an “e‐commerce enterprise management programme” in Bangladesh, an attempt to start e‐commerce from the home country, consultancy and probing the latest e‐commerce books, magazines, the international network of membership organisations and 25 years of living and working experience in developing countries have made this critical expedition possible. The research finds that human condition, political aspects and environmental issues are serious factors for any meaningful development. While re‐engineering demands cohesive and holistic management of the vital three vectors and their alignment with corporate strategy, organisations of developing countries are miserably lagging behind for such radical transition. The endangered future of nearly 5 billion people sends a strong red signal of the turbulent future of the global economy and even more!

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2019

Celia Álvarez-Botas and Víctor M. González-Méndez

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of economic development on the influence of country-level determinants on corporate debt maturity, bearing in mind firm…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the effect of economic development on the influence of country-level determinants on corporate debt maturity, bearing in mind firm size and the period of financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors employ panel data estimation with fixed effects to examine the role of economic development in influencing the relationship between country-level determinants on corporate debt maturity. The paper uses a sample of 30,727 listed firms, belonging to 39 countries, over the period 2005–2012.

Findings

Corporate debt maturity increases with the efficiency of the legal system and bank concentration and decreases with the weight of banks in the economy. However, the importance of these country determinants is greater in developing than in developed countries. The authors also show that firm size in developed and developing countries influences country determinants of corporate debt maturity. Finally, the results reveal that the financial crisis has affected the debt maturity of firms differently in developed and developing countries, with the effect of bank concentration lengthening debt maturity, this effect being more pronounced in developing countries.

Practical implications

The findings provide useful insights to guide policy decisions providing access to long-term financing, as corporate debt maturity depends on economic development, institutional environment, banking structure and firm size.

Originality/value

This study incorporates economic development in explaining the relationship between country-level determinants and corporate debt maturity.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

Keywords

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