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Article
Publication date: 20 June 2019

Ruan Li

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first century is the society of information technology and knowledge-based economy. To cope with the information society, teaching methods would be changed. Traditional chalk and talk can no longer adapt to the changing society. In addition to passing down the tradition, new ideas should also be introduced. In the informational age, the internet becomes an essential living element and synchronous Web-based teaching breaks through the obstacle of space, provides instant and multiple communication channels and creates alternative creativity learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

With experimental design, totally, 208 students in Fujian University of Technology, as the research objects, were led to a 15-week (3 hours per week for total 45 hours) experimental teaching. The study uses analysis of variance for discussing the effect of synchronous Web-based teaching on art students’ creativity and further understanding the effect of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of synchronous Web-based teaching on creativity, visually creative teaching on creativity and the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on the promotion of creativity.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample size taken in this study was not large enough to fully reflect the results of the study. The survey sample didn’t cover all the major cities in China, which had a small coverage and couldn’t reflect the research situation of the whole country. Second, the evaluation criteria for artistic students’ creativity were too broad. More specific evaluation rules should be set and the creativity standards should be graded to better guide the implementation of art courses and the cultivation of students’ creativity.

Practical implications

The synchronous Web-based learning environment provides favorable individual thinking space to effectively reduce disturbance among classmates. Synchronous Web-based teaching shares sound, pictures and even films with each other to enrich the learning media. What is more, teachers would be more convenient and fast to deal with materials or handouts or rapidly updating materials and avoiding the loss of handouts.

Originality/value

This paper studied the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity, which was a meaningful and innovative topic. And this study can provide more enlightenment and reference for future education.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2019

Chia-Chen Chen, Carmen Cámara, Kuo-Lun Hsiao, Tien-Yu Hsu and Arun Kumar Sangaiah

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385

Abstract

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Judith Schwartz

This paper aims to explore a study that examines the role of academic librarians who teach visual literacy within their information literacy curricula.

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1415

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore a study that examines the role of academic librarians who teach visual literacy within their information literacy curricula.

Design/methodology/approach

The author developed a survey that was distributed to five listservs during a three-week period, generating 118 responses from academic libraries. The author subsequently interviewed 16 participants.

Findings

The findings reveal that visual literacy is important across all disciplines. However, a majority of academic librarians who replied to the survey stated that they do not teach visual literacy. Only 37.3 per cent of the respondents indicated that they or their institutions include a visual literacy component in their sessions.

Practical implications

The paper identifies the most relevant visual literacy trends, and it includes examples of visual literacy skills and concepts being taught in academic libraries. It provides ideas to develop marketing strategies to increase student enrollment in library workshops.

Originality/value

This study has expanded librarians’ awareness of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education. In addition, it explores the teaching of multiliteracies such as visual literacy within the information literacy framework in the academic library. The survey data demonstrate that academic librarians are slowly embracing visual literacy and including it in their information literacy instruction across all disciplines. The study recommends that librarians work on their professional development to become multiliterate to remain relevant within their academic communities.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

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5009

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

John Hamilton and Singwhat Tee

Four learning modes, interacting through students as different learning systems, are mapped into a cone-of-learning continuum that allows tertiary institutions to visually

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1182

Abstract

Purpose

Four learning modes, interacting through students as different learning systems, are mapped into a cone-of-learning continuum that allows tertiary institutions to visually re-consider where within their cone-of-learning, they choose to position their learning approaches. Two forms of blended learning are also distinguished. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Undergraduate law, business, IT, and creative arts student perceptions are structural equation modelled (SEM) into traditional, blended-enabled, blended-enhanced, and flexible learning systems.

Findings

Within the SEM derived learning cone-of-learning continuum, a migration from traditional learning systems towards blended and flexible learning systems typically offers higher-net levels of undergraduate student learning experiences and outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The authors do not capture learning system feedback loops, but the cone-of-learning approaches can position against chosen competitors. The authors recognise benchmark, positioning, and transferability differences may exist between different tertiary institutions; different learning areas; and different countries of operation. Cone-of-learning studies can expand to capture student perceptions of their value acquisitions, overall satisfaction, plus trust, and loyalty considerations.

Practical implications

The cone-of-learning shows shifts towards flexibility as generating higher student learning experiences, higher student learning outcomes, and as flexible technologies mature this demands higher student inputs. These interactive experiential systems approaches can readily incorporate new technologies, gamifications, and engagements which are testable for additional student deep-learning contributions. Experiential deep-learning systems also have wide industrial applications.

Social implications

Understanding the continuum of transitioning between and across deeper-learning systems offers general social benefit.

Originality/value

Learning system studies remain complex, variable systems, dependent on instructors, students, and their shared experiential engagements environments. This cone-of-learning continuum approach is useful for educators, business, and societal life-long learners who seek to gauge learning and outcomes.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Douglas Brownlie

The aim of this paper is to introduce the topic of poster presentation as legitimate area of academic study and practice within the marketing discipline.

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5547

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to introduce the topic of poster presentation as legitimate area of academic study and practice within the marketing discipline.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents the output of one part of a research project that reviewed the state of knowledge and practice within poster presentation as a dissemination medium for research information. The results of the literature search are presented as an annotated bibliography.

Findings

The literature search reveals a sizeable body of material on the use of poster presentation as a dissemination media, indicative of a set of key themes that guide good practice in poster design, construction and presentation. It also includes material that has studied the use of poster design and presentation exercises as pedagogical devices.

Research limitations/implications

The research on which the paper is based is limited by virtue of not offering a more complete survey of contemporary poster presentation practice across the sciences. It draws observations from the author's attendance at several marketing and management‐related conferences where poster presenters have been interviewed and examples of poster presentation have been collected. However, in the sciences, especially the medical sciences, poster practice is well‐established and in some cases moving towards digitisation.

Practical implications

The aesthetics of poster design remain unclear in the case of poster design for the dissemination of scientific information. However, a set of templates has been produced based on the close study of a database of over 600 poster designs and ten years' experience of using posters as teaching tools for research training. A methodology for poster design has also been developed known as “The Block Architecture Method of Poster Design”. It uses the software Powerpoint and Photoshop to develop poster design electronically.

Originality/value

The bibliography will help interested teachers and students explore the various issues surrounding poster design, construction and presentation. It will also help to understand some of the advantages of using poster‐design exercises as creative and critical devices in a pedagogical context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2005

Susan G. Magliaro and R. Neal Shambaugh

Different images of teacher knowledge and of teaching are described using the conceptual structure of Cochran-Smith and Lytle (1999a), in which knowledge and practice are…

Abstract

Different images of teacher knowledge and of teaching are described using the conceptual structure of Cochran-Smith and Lytle (1999a), in which knowledge and practice are viewed as either formal, practical, or transformative. Instructional design (ID) represents a formal image of knowledge and frames the teacher as a problem-solver. Teachers, however, have been resistant to the use of ID. In a graduate ID course, students were given the task of drawing their own representation of the ID process. Two research questions framed the study, including How might these models be categorized? and What views of teaching were found in the models? From 13 deliveries of the course, 123 models and explanatory narratives were analyzed from students who were teachers. The course and ID model task are described. A recursive cycle of categorization and theme-building were used. Types of models included those characterized by Human Activity (51 models), Components (23), Artifacts (20), Organic (15), and Flow Charts (14). Views of teaching included Teacher-centered (47 models), Designer-centered (36 models), Co-centered (18), Learner-centered (16), and De-centered (6). Analysis revealed that for teachers ID activity is a human activity and the principal focus for design activity is teacher needs. Implications are summarized in terms of teacher knowledge and expertise, as well as limitations to our methodology.

Details

Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Arzu Deveci Topal, Esra Çoban Budak and Aynur Kolburan Geçer

The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of algorithm teaching on the problem-solving skills of deaf-hard hearing students.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of algorithm teaching on the problem-solving skills of deaf-hard hearing students.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, a pre-test and post-test problem-solving scale was applied to the single group (16 deaf-hard hearing students at a secondary school level) that had received algorithm education. Pre-test and post-test results were compared in order to see whether there was a significant difference among students in terms of their problem-solving attitudes. Students’ levels of performing the applications were examined through observation forms and their opinions about algorithm teaching were received.

Findings

As a result of the research, it was determined that implemented algorithm teaching had a significant effect on improving the problem-solving skills of the students.

Originality/value

Scratch training can be administered as either a compulsory or an optional course for hearing students as the Scratch programme offers the opportunity of teaching algorithmic reasoning with games, making the courses entertaining and giving students the chance to create their own designs which helps to improve their creative problem-solving skills and their motivation accordingly. Scratch teaching can be beneficial in developing students’ problem-solving behaviours and creativity.

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Article
Publication date: 7 January 2014

Joan E. Beaudoin

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research study which examined how and why images were used by professional image users to inform the design and development of…

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1686

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research study which examined how and why images were used by professional image users to inform the design and development of information systems and services.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 participants in four user groups, archaeologist, architect, art historian and artist, took part in this qualitative research study. Data was collected through a survey and one-on-one semi-structured interview and data analysis was completed using case-ordered displays and the constant comparative method.

Findings

The findings revealed that image use varied according to profession. Archaeologists and art historians identified using images within their lecture presentations, and for research and publications. While architects and artists noted using images for research and design creation, their work products differed. Several reasons why these professionals used images in their work were identified: knowledge, conceptual model, inspiration, cognitive recall, critical thinking, emotion, engagement, marketing, proof, social connection, translation, and trust.

Research limitations/implications

Study limitations include the small number of user groups, and methods dependent on participants' abilities to recall and clearly articulate past activities.

Originality/value

The study clarifies the varied roles visual information plays in the work of archaeologists, architects, art historians and artists. As the paper reveals how and why images are used, its contents are particularly useful for systems designers, librarians and other individuals who support image users.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Ineta Luka

The paper aims to analyse the application of a pedagogy-based approach to designing online language learning courses. It aims to evaluate course efficiency from three…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to analyse the application of a pedagogy-based approach to designing online language learning courses. It aims to evaluate course efficiency from three perspectives – provider, recipient and wider community perspective and define the extent to which the target course could be applied for developing tourism and hospitality industry students’ and employees’ language competences in Europe.

Design/methodology/approach

In line with pragmatism paradigm, a summative/outcome evaluation research in provider, recipient and wider community perspective was conducted in Latvia, Croatia, Slovenia, Romania and Italy. It comprised a focus group interview of 8 language teachers (the provider perspective), a survey of 505 students (the recipient perspective) and a survey of 106 language teachers and 161 industry representatives and 10 expert interviews (the wider community perspective).

Findings

The results highlight the main strengths of online learning environments and emphasise the efficiency of the pedagogy-based approach applied in designing an online course. The created courses are beneficial and may be used to foster the development of tourism and hospitality industry students’ and employees’ language competences.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample is composed of language learners from five countries, but it is not proportionally distributed. Another limitation refers to the languages piloted. Further in-depth study concerning less widely used languages is required.

Practical implications

The research results enable understanding certain aspects of designing online language learning courses, provide evaluators’ feedback, suggest the course application for language learning and reveal the European value added.

Originality/value

The research explores the specifics for designing online language learning courses for Languages for Special Purposes for the application in tourism and hospitality industry. The course efficiency and quality are evaluated from provider, recipient and wider community perspective.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

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