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Article

Holger Berg, Vesa Taatila and Christine Volkmann

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a theoretical framework for teaching creativity.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach and the model are based on a review of the prevalent theory and research on creativity.

Findings

The authors develop a process based approach and design and a four step model to teaching creativity.

Research limitations/implications

The paper provides a framework from which exercises and interventions for teaching creativity may be derived on a scientific basis.

Practical implications

Practical implications regard teaching and conveying creativity to students.

Originality/value

The paper addresses scholars and practitioners concerned with research and teaching of creativity and innovation. It is to the authors' knowledge one of the first approaches that links theory and research of creativity to actual teaching efforts.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

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Article

Ruan Li

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to study the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity. The twenty-first century is the society of information technology and knowledge-based economy. To cope with the information society, teaching methods would be changed. Traditional chalk and talk can no longer adapt to the changing society. In addition to passing down the tradition, new ideas should also be introduced. In the informational age, the internet becomes an essential living element and synchronous Web-based teaching breaks through the obstacle of space, provides instant and multiple communication channels and creates alternative creativity learning environment.

Design/methodology/approach

With experimental design, totally, 208 students in Fujian University of Technology, as the research objects, were led to a 15-week (3 hours per week for total 45 hours) experimental teaching. The study uses analysis of variance for discussing the effect of synchronous Web-based teaching on art students’ creativity and further understanding the effect of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity.

Findings

The research results show significant effects of synchronous Web-based teaching on creativity, visually creative teaching on creativity and the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on the promotion of creativity.

Research limitations/implications

First, the sample size taken in this study was not large enough to fully reflect the results of the study. The survey sample didn’t cover all the major cities in China, which had a small coverage and couldn’t reflect the research situation of the whole country. Second, the evaluation criteria for artistic students’ creativity were too broad. More specific evaluation rules should be set and the creativity standards should be graded to better guide the implementation of art courses and the cultivation of students’ creativity.

Practical implications

The synchronous Web-based learning environment provides favorable individual thinking space to effectively reduce disturbance among classmates. Synchronous Web-based teaching shares sound, pictures and even films with each other to enrich the learning media. What is more, teachers would be more convenient and fast to deal with materials or handouts or rapidly updating materials and avoiding the loss of handouts.

Originality/value

This paper studied the effects of the combination of synchronous Web-based teaching with visually creative teaching on art students’ creativity, which was a meaningful and innovative topic. And this study can provide more enlightenment and reference for future education.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Book part

Richard Tunstall, Lenita Nieminen, Lin Jing and Rasmus Hjorth

Educators are increasingly required to develop creativity and entrepreneurial capabilities amongst students, yet within the fields of entrepreneurship and innovation these…

Abstract

Purpose

Educators are increasingly required to develop creativity and entrepreneurial capabilities amongst students, yet within the fields of entrepreneurship and innovation these are presented as separate processes. We explore the theoretical and conceptual similarities and differences between these processes, and relate this to a range of experiential and digitally enhanced learning activities in formal education settings.

Methodology/approach

We present a conceptual model of the iterative nature of creativity and entrepreneurship as separate cognitive and social processes leading to aesthetic or sense-making outcomes. This leads to a discussion of how these processes may be experienced by students within an educational setting.

Findings

We propose a framework of learning activities which support the development of creativity through teaching entrepreneurially, at primary, secondary, and tertiary education levels. A range of different approaches is critically evaluated according to their relevance, including business planning, simulations, roleplay, co-creation, and flashmobs. Flashmobs are proposed to be most suitable and an outline learning activity design is mapped in detail against creative and entrepreneurial processes.

Research and Practical implications

This chapter supports educational practice and research on learning through entrepreneurship in allowing educators and researchers to evaluate how learning activities may directly contribute to students’ learning through experience and the development of their creative and entrepreneurial mind-set.

Originality/value

This chapter is of value to educators as it explains how creative and entrepreneurial processes may be experienced by students through different forms of learning activity. It is of further value to research on entrepreneurial learning in considering how the creative process may inform entrepreneurial action.

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Article

Simona Mihai‐Yiannaki and Savvas Savvides

This paper aims to highlight for the first time, creativity's vital role in a new approach in the higher education world which can improve the current university…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to highlight for the first time, creativity's vital role in a new approach in the higher education world which can improve the current university instructional strategies post financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper offers a theoretical framework which has emerged from literature review and personal business and educational experiences of the authors. It seeks to provide synthetically some answers/“solutions”, focusing on a three dimensional framework: where to play the game of creativity; how to deliver creativity to business students, meaning by what structures and methods; and how to win in implementing this game.

Findings

Many researchers appeared to focus on making their findings applicable to the entire education system paying little attention to issues specific to the business education sector. Succinctly, the focus of the papers is on “how to do it” part, which provides several realistic insights on how to connect communities into the game of creativity. Other methods required relate to: balancing creativity with core essentials; promoting excellence and sustainability; networking between students; faculty, management and community; improving learning environment; developing staff; teaching; learning competencies and programme curricula under an integrated service vision; anticipating educational future trends in networking; and building creative climates and partnerships.

Originality/value

The paper's conclusions and recommendations present a practical set of good practices through the explicit and implicit identification of core characteristics for creativity in higher education. Eventually, the first mission in wanting to be creative is to really comprehend the problem, knowing all ways to approach it.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Book part

Tania von der Heidt

This chapter provides an interpretive account of how a large student cohort deals with a major inquiry-based learning (IBL) assessment task in a first-year Marketing…

Abstract

This chapter provides an interpretive account of how a large student cohort deals with a major inquiry-based learning (IBL) assessment task in a first-year Marketing Principles subject in undergraduate business studies. It offers a practical example of IBL in action in a discipline that has hitherto received little attention in the IBL literature, namely business, specifically marketing. The chapter positions IBL within the various contemporary pedagogies. The context of Hutchings and O’Rourke’s (2006) study of IBL in action is extended for first-year cohorts, technology-enhanced teaching and the marketing discipline. Further, Hutchings and O’Rourke’s four-part method for describing IBL in action is followed: (1) the enabling factors for the students’ work are described; (2) the process for which they decided on the task is discussed; (3) the method of work is considered, namely ongoing collaboration in a wiki and (4) the outcomes produced are discussed. The chapter reflects on the effects of the IBL task on student learning from both students’ and instructors’ points of view. Material from the students’ work and feedback after completion of the IBL task is used to illustrate the process and inform the interpretive account. The main lessons to be learnt for educators are summarised.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

Content available
Article

Maria Rowena D.R. Raymundo

Higher education institutions (HEIs) frequently overlook the importance of encouraging creative thinking in students. A review of the prevailing practices in a fully…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions (HEIs) frequently overlook the importance of encouraging creative thinking in students. A review of the prevailing practices in a fully online tertiary distance education (DE) institution revealed a lack of learning activities that foster creativity. The study aims to find out whether the creative collaborative group project is a feasible, effective and acceptable learning activity for fostering creativity in students of a fully online graduate-level DE course.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven groups of five to six graduate students each had five weeks to conceptualize, prepare and deliver a creative collaborative group project on lifelong learning using key concepts learned from the course.

Findings

All groups submitted well-crafted creative projects within the given time frame. Reflections on their experience positively correlated with known outcomes associated with creative skills. Students valued the experience and had a better understanding of the concepts. These support the feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability of the project for fostering creativity in a fully online DE institution.

Research limitations/implications

The feasibility, effectiveness and acceptability may vary in different contexts; future iterations in the same and/or other courses are recommended.

Practical implications

The creative collaborative group project is a feasible, effective and acceptable strategy for fostering creativity in online distance education.

Social implications

Creativity can be enhanced through appropriate online collaborative learning activities.

Originality/value

The study adds to the body of literature on the use of creative collaborative group projects to foster creativity in HEIs.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

Keywords

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Article

Derrick Robinson, Ben M. Schaap and Mejai Avoseh

The purpose of this paper is to explore emerging themes in which creativity, or creative pedagogy (CP), is aligned with the practices of higher education instruction. The…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore emerging themes in which creativity, or creative pedagogy (CP), is aligned with the practices of higher education instruction. The componential theory of creativity (Amabile, 2012) was used as the lens for examining CP of the study’s participants.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an exploratory case study of institutionally recognized effective teachers at a flagship university in the upper mid-western region of the USA, researchers sought to see which themes emerge and align with the four components of CP. Researchers used semi-structured interviews, document analysis, and artifact data to support thematic development.

Findings

Four themes emerge from the study to align with CP: administrative support; praxis and environment; content learning; and student independence. Of the four themes, praxis and environment are found to be most dominant in the study. Within each theme, surrounding environment and creative-relevant components of CP emerge as the most dominant. In all, it can be concluded that effective teachers position themselves toward themes and components that offer the most impact for students.

Originality/value

Applying Amabile’s (2012) components of creativity to analyze the pedagogical practices of institutionally recognized teachers of excellence encourages deeper observation of pedagogical practices on higher education faculty and institutional impact on pedagogy. Recommendations are offered for both institutions of higher education and its faculty.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

Svanborg Rannveig Jónsdóttir and M. Allyson Macdonald

The purpose of this paper is to construct a means of assessing the feasibility of implementing innovation and entrepreneurial education (IEE) in schools. The study focuses…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to construct a means of assessing the feasibility of implementing innovation and entrepreneurial education (IEE) in schools. The study focuses on teaching IEE in middle school (Grades 5–7).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from six middle school teachers in three Icelandic compulsory schools through on-site observations and semi-structured interviews with teachers and principals. Data including documentary evidence were subjected to the method of constant comparison. A model of nested systems provided concepts to create categories for a general rubric of feasible IEE development, the Social ecology rubrics for innovation and entrepreneurship in schools (SERIES).

Findings

Profiles of the six IEE teachers emerged during data collection. Teachers found some IEE methods challenging, especially “standing back” allowing students freedom and agency. Implementation was fragile when IEE developed without support from neighboring systems. In all three schools the weakest connections were with the exosystem (general views in society).

Practical implications

The range of knowledge, skills and competences that emerged in the data could be discussed with teachers as a source of professional development. The application of the SERIES approach can benefit policy, research and practice and developing similar rubrics can provide a valuable assessment approach in other curriculum areas.

Originality/value

An advantage of the rubric is that it is descriptive rather than prescriptive, giving schools an opportunity to develop their own standards. Any professional group can produce their own profile, with categories of levels and systems that reflect their own practice and development.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article

Véronique Boulocher-Passet, Peter Daly and Isabelle Sequeira

The purpose of this paper is to encourage initiatives to train large cohorts of undergraduate students for creativity understanding. The authors describe a case study of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to encourage initiatives to train large cohorts of undergraduate students for creativity understanding. The authors describe a case study of a creativity exercise developed within a corporate setting that accommodates a large cohort and discuss the results of empirical research on this teaching experience at a French Business School. The authors reflect on the transferability of this exercise by other educators to similar educational contexts and the usefulness of training future managers to a structured creativity methodology to be exploited in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study explains the features of the exercise. Hard data on students’ perceptions and motivation/satisfaction prior to and after the creativity exercise was collected through an internet self-completed survey instrument. In total, 245 pairs of survey responses from first-year students were analysed using prototypical analysis, paired samples t-test and content analysis.

Findings

The exercise proved an effective tool to help large cohorts of undergraduates to better understand that creativity is a managerial competence that can be trained. The authors particularly underlined the need for fluidity in the organisation of the exercise; use of a clear creativity process and methodology; the necessity to involve an external creativity consultant; and the importance of the chosen topic being non art related. In the workplace, this understanding of creativity methodologies will enable future managers to support, promote and manage creativity endeavours.

Originality/value

This paper encourages initiatives and provides insights into the difficulties of training large cohorts of undergraduate students for understanding the concept of creativity.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 35 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Content available
Article

Lluís Solé, Laia Sole-Coromina and Simon Ellis Poole

Creativity is nowadays seen as a desirable goal in higher education. In artistic disciplines, creative processes are frequently employed to assess or evaluate different…

Abstract

Purpose

Creativity is nowadays seen as a desirable goal in higher education. In artistic disciplines, creative processes are frequently employed to assess or evaluate different students' skills. The purpose of this study is to identify potential pitfalls for students involved in artistic practices in which being creative is essential.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups involving Education Faculty members from different artistic disciplines allowed for the identification of several constraints when creativity was invoked. This initial study used a quantitative approach and took place in the “Universitat de Vic” (Catalonia, Spain).

Findings

Findings suggest a correlation with existing literature and simultaneously point at some nuances that require consideration: emerging aspects embedded in creative processes that may help decrease some limiting effects that being creative can generate.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitations of this research derive from the very nature of the methodological approach. Focus group has been the single used source. Other means of collecting data, such as the analysis of programs, could be used in the future.

Originality/value

This case study, while culturally specific, offers a useful insight into the potential of further work in non-artistic disciplines but crucially across disciplines. It has tremendous value for the development of intercultural understanding in the higher education sector, specifically in terms of assessment.

Details

Journal of Work-Applied Management, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2205-2062

Keywords

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