Search results

1 – 10 of 167
Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Michelle Carter and Chris Carter

Creative and cultural producers, like social enterprises, operate in a complex business environment where the value proposition is difficult to define, and the organisational…

9698

Abstract

Purpose

Creative and cultural producers, like social enterprises, operate in a complex business environment where the value proposition is difficult to define, and the organisational motivations are not always financially driven. In the case of Australian visual artists, low incomes and limited access to government funding magnify the importance of developing sustainable business models. This paper aims to present the Creative Business Model Canvas (CBMC), a reinterpretation of Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC (2010), for the benefit of a visual artist’s business planning.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses data from semi-structured interviews to analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of the Osterwalder and Pigneur’s BMC (2010) for use by creative artists to understand the value of their artwork beyond traditional profit-driven business models. A modified canvas is presented to capture a clearer snapshot of creative arts practice with a focus on value propositions that possess dimensions of symbolic value.

Findings

This study found that the symbolic value of an artist’s practice is difficult to capture using Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC (2010). An artist value proposition is composed of the artifact, artistic services and the artist’s identity. The creative CBMC, as a modified CBMC, captures aspects of the artistic identity such as professional achievements, personal life and the artist’s authenticity.

Originality/value

This study builds on Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC and reimagines it for use by visual artists and art-based social enterprise organisations where the notion of value can be challenging to articulate.

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2023

Michael Dinger, Julie T. Wade, Steven Dinger, Michelle Carter and Jason Bennett Thatcher

This paper investigates the dynamics between state affect and trusting cognitive beliefs on post-adoptive information technology (IT) use behaviors in the form of intention to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper investigates the dynamics between state affect and trusting cognitive beliefs on post-adoptive information technology (IT) use behaviors in the form of intention to explore and deep structure usage. That state affect can influence behaviors is recognized in practice. In fact, some studies examine the impact of affective constructs, but the way state affect impacts how individuals use IT remains largely unexplored. The authors theorize that state affect, in the form of positive and negative affect, will influence trusting cognitive beliefs regarding an IT artifact (in terms of perceived helpfulness, capability and reliability) and, more importantly, directly influence intention to explore and deep structure usage.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors test the model using a sample of 357 IT users. Survey items were derived from established measures, and the data were analyzed using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results of this study suggest that positive affect and negative affect impact trusting cognitive beliefs. Trusting cognitive beliefs positively impact intention to explore with an IT and deep structure usage of an IT. Even in the presence of trusting beliefs, though, positive affect directly impacts intention to explore. Positive affect and negative affect both also have various indirect, mediated effects on intention to explore and deep structure usage.

Originality/value

In order to maximize value from workplace IT, the results suggest managers foster an authentic, positive work environment in order to harness or redirect employees' emotional energies.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 August 2022

Wenjing Zhang and Dong Li

The mobile medical consultation (MMC) service is growing rapidly, but not all consumers are always willing to actively engage with it. To address this issue, based on IT identity…

487

Abstract

Purpose

The mobile medical consultation (MMC) service is growing rapidly, but not all consumers are always willing to actively engage with it. To address this issue, based on IT identity theory, this study explores the underlying mechanism of how two types of platform-related consumer experience influence MMC platform identity, in turn, result in consumer negatively-valenced engagement in MMC.

Design/methodology/approach

The data was collected from 400 consumers with the experience of MMC and analyzed by the partial least square (PLS) method.

Findings

The findings unfold that these two distinct consumer experience, servicescape experience (i.e. perceived telepresence and perceived platform surveillance) and service search experience (i.e. perceived diagnosticity and perceived serendipity), are associated with MMC platform identity and consumer negatively valenced engagement with MMC.

Originality/value

Research on consumer negatively-valenced engagement in the field of MMC is still in a nascent stage. The study identifies consumer experience in accordance with the unique context of the MMC platform and fills the research gap on the role of IT identity in consumer negatively valenced engagement.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 122 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1988

TDS Circuits plc, the Blackburn based high‐technology manufacturer of multilayer printed circuit boards, has made two new senior management appointments. John W. Whybrow has been…

Abstract

TDS Circuits plc, the Blackburn based high‐technology manufacturer of multilayer printed circuit boards, has made two new senior management appointments. John W. Whybrow has been appointed Managing Director, and David Dickson becomes the new Sales and Marketing Manager.

Details

Circuit World, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Deborah K. King

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to their…

Abstract

As the First Lady, Michelle Obama stated that she had a number of priorities but that the first year would be mainly about supporting her two girls in their transitions to their new life in the White House. Her choice to be mom-in-chief drew unusually intense and rather puzzling, scrutiny. The chapter briefly discusses the range of reactions along the political spectrum as well as African-American feminists’ analyses of the stereotypes of Black women underlying those reactions. This analysis engages the debates from a different perspective. First, the chapter addresses the under-theorizing of the racialized gender norms embedded in the symbolism of the White House and the role of First Lady. It challenges the presumption of traditional notions of true womanhood and the incorrect conclusion that mothering would preclude public engagement.

Second and most importantly, this chapter argues that there are fundamental misunderstandings of what mothering meant for Michelle Obama as African-American woman. Cultural traditions and socio-historical conditions have led Black women, both relatives and non-kin, to form mothering relationships with others’ children and to appreciate the interdependence of “nurturing” one's own children, other children, and entire communities. Those practitioners whose nurturing activities encompassed commitment and contributions to the collectivity were referred to as community othermothering. Using primary sources, this chapter examines in detail Michelle Obama's socialization for and her practice of community othermothering in her role as First Lady. Attention is focused on her transformation of White House events by extending hospitality to more within Washington, DC, and the nation, plus broadening young people's exposure to inspiration, opportunities, and support for setting and accomplishing their dreams. Similarly, the concept of community othermothering is also used to explain Michelle Obama’s reinterpretation of the traditional First Lady's special project into the ambitious “Let's Move” initiative to end childhood obesity within a generation. The othermothering values and endeavors have helped establish the White House as “the People's House.”

Details

Race in the Age of Obama
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-167-2

Book part
Publication date: 17 March 2020

Jordan G. Smith, Michelle L. Flynn, Marissa L. Shuffler, Dorothy R. Carter and Amanda L. Thayer

Meetings can serve the important role of facilitating communication and coordination for systems of teams known as “multiteam systems” (MTSs) that work interdependently to achieve…

Abstract

Meetings can serve the important role of facilitating communication and coordination for systems of teams known as “multiteam systems” (MTSs) that work interdependently to achieve grand societal challenges. Given that MTSs often appear in complex, ambiguous, urgent, and multifaceted task contexts, the MTSs require effective, and efficient but thorough, communication within and between teams in order to achieve shared goals. However, the extant literature regarding the science of meetings has left much to be explored in regard to the inter- and intrateam influences and impacts. This chapter considers the significance of meetings and their practical value in facilitating MTS processes and performance by leveraging what is known thus far regarding MTS structural attributes, their value, their challenges, and opportunities, integrating this foundation with the broader science of meetings. Building on this rationale, the authors move toward empirically and theoretically derived considerations for how meetings may best be designed, facilitated and utilized for MTS effectiveness, as guided by our current understanding of critical MTS attributes.

Details

Managing Meetings in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-227-0

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2017

Karin Klenke

Abstract

Details

Women in Leadership 2nd Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-064-8

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2012

Karon N. LeCompte and Michelle Bauml

We present an instructional strategy in which children utilize critical thinking skills to interpret images related to social studies concepts. To illustrate, we focus on teaching…

Abstract

We present an instructional strategy in which children utilize critical thinking skills to interpret images related to social studies concepts. To illustrate, we focus on teaching First Amendment freedoms; however, we encourage teachers to apply the strategy with other social studies concepts. Using visual media such as paintings and photographs to teach abstract social studies concepts can be especially helpful for teachers working with English language learners and young children. Suggested resources for locating images for classroom use are provided.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 August 2019

Erik M. Hines, Desiree D. Vega, Renae Mayes, Paul C. Harris and Michelle Mack

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of both the school counselor and the school psychologist in preparing students in urban school settings for college and/or the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the role of both the school counselor and the school psychologist in preparing students in urban school settings for college and/or the workforce. Throughout this paper, the authors discuss how collaboration is critical to ensuring students are successful at every school level (e.g., elementary, middle and high) to avail themselves of various postsecondary opportunities upon graduation. The authors give recommendations for practice and future research to implement and increase knowledge around collaboration between school counselors and school psychologists in preparing students in urban school settings to be college- and career-ready.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper on school counselors and school psychologists using the Eight Components of College and Career Readiness Framework to collaborate on preparing students for postsecondary options.

Findings

With support from key stakeholders like administrators, teachers and parents, school counselors and school psychologists can work collaboratively to increase students’ college and career readiness. For example, school counselors and school psychologists may start by creating and implementing a needs assessment, as it relates to the developmental tasks of students (i.e. self-regulation, self-efficacy, self-competence) that must be negotiated to ensure college and career readiness. School counselors and school psychologists should also examine out-of-school suspension, expulsion, school arrest and disciplinary referral data (Carter et al., 2014).

Originality/value

Collaboration around college and career readiness is important to the academic success and future of students in urban school settings. School counselors and school psychologists complement each other in preparing students for college and the workforce because their training has prepared both for addressing academic needs, assessment, mental health issues, career development, behavioral concerns and social–emotional needs of students (American School Counselor Association, 2012; National Association of School Psychologists, 2014). Further, school counselors and school psychologists are in a pivotal position to create a college-going culture by using evidence-based activities, curricula and practices.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 September 2017

Catherine Simpson Bueker

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States engaged in…

Abstract

This case study explores the ways in which black and Latino women who graduated from a predominantly white, elite public high school in the Northeastern United States engaged in varied acts of resistance while students there, both within the classroom and within the larger community. The women accessed the high school through one of the three ways: as town residents, as commuters, or as boarders through two distinct voluntary racial desegregation programs. Through in-depth interviews with 37 women, two overriding trends appear in the data – a form of “resistance for liberation” or “political resistance” in which women push against stereotypes, introduce new programming, and work to reform policies and curriculum, and a smaller strain of “resistance for survival” in which women actively utilize stereotypes. Women with greater amounts of both dominant and nondominant forms of cultural capital are more likely to engage in “political resistance,” while women with lesser amounts of dominant cultural capital show more evidence of “resistance for survival.” Variation exists by point of entry into the system, with town residents showing the lowest levels of either form of resistance.

Details

The Power of Resistance
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-462-6

Keywords

1 – 10 of 167