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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2021

Zhaoyu Chen, Xiaolian Chen and Barry Mak

This paper aims to identify the nature of creative tourism and the roles of interrelated concepts especially those of creative industries in the value creation process, by…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the nature of creative tourism and the roles of interrelated concepts especially those of creative industries in the value creation process, by analyzing the trends in existing practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a thorough literature review of the multidisciplinary “creative” related research, this paper provides a conceptual insight of the value creation process in creative tourism.

Findings

A conceptual framework is provided to consolidate the value creation process of a creative economy by considering the nature of creative tourism and interrelated concepts.

Research limitations/implications

This study contributes to the literature because it provides a valid research base and insights for future research, based on a clear perspective that amalgamates essential information.

Practical implications

Creative tourism offers immense opportunities in the global context as tourists are constantly looking for new experiences and opportunities. This study provides insights for creative workforces, entrepreneurs and organizations in formulating appropriate management and marketing strategies by considering all relevant components and the roles they can play to capitalize on this opportunity.

Originality/value

Creative industries play a critical role in introducing new strategies in the service sector by enabling an upgrade of value-added activities to those that are currently offered, in a sustainable manner. However, studies so far have not taken into consideration the nature of the sector and have not attempted to clarify its relevance (for example, creativity, creative industries and creative workforces) in the value creation process. The study contributes to filling the gap from a conceptual perspective.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Doris Ruth Eikhof and Chris Warhurst

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of why social inequalities and discrimination remain in the creative industries.

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3819

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a more comprehensive understanding of why social inequalities and discrimination remain in the creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper synthesizes existing academic and industry research and data, with a particular focus on the creative media industries.

Findings

The paper reveals that existing understanding of the lack of diversity in the creative industries’ workforce is conceptually limited. Better understanding is enabled through an approach centred on the creative industries’ model of production. This approach explains why disadvantage and discrimination are systemic, not transitory.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that current policy assumptions about the creative industries are misguided and need to be reconsidered. The findings also indicate how future research of the creative industries ought to be framed.

Originality/value

The paper provides a novel synthesis of existing research and data to explain how the creative industries’ model of production translates into particular features of work and employment, which then translate into social inequalities that entrench discrimination based on sex, race and class.

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2018

Elham Lafzi Ghazi and Miguel Goede

The purpose of this paper is to contribute critically to understanding the structure of creative industries in Isfahan.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute critically to understanding the structure of creative industries in Isfahan.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors first gather needed information about the case study and then analyze the data according to three measures of gross value added, employment and the dynamics of business for each sector of creative industries.

Findings

Results indicate that creative industries are medium-sized domestic enterprises which are comparatively weak in productivity in some sectors.

Originality/value

This paper illustrates the model of creative industries assessment for Isfahan city and, finally, provides a good understanding of the concept of the creative industries as a key element of the creative city.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2010

Bahar Durmaz, Stephen Platt and Tan Yigitcanlar

The paper aims to examine the role of creative industries in general and the film industry in particular for place‐making, spatial development, tourism, and the formation…

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3177

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the role of creative industries in general and the film industry in particular for place‐making, spatial development, tourism, and the formation of creative cities.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reveals the preliminary findings of two case studies from Beyoglu, Istanbul, and Soho, London.

Findings

The research found a relation between place and creativity and the positive contribution to creativity of being in a city center. Among the creative industries, the film industry plays an important role in the economic and spatial development of cities by fostering endogenous creativeness, attracting exogenous talent, and contributing to the formation of places that creative cities require.

Originality/value

The paper raises interesting questions about the importance of place to creativity, also questioning whether creative industries can be a driver for regeneration.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2018

Naoum Mylonas and Eugenia Petridou

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether predicting factors of conventional ventures’ performance are appropriate in interpreting the creative industries

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether predicting factors of conventional ventures’ performance are appropriate in interpreting the creative industries context. Moreover, this paper introduces a way to measure venture performance in creative industries.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire was used to address this research objectives, based mainly on scales tested in previous studies. Data were collected from a sample of 371 female entrepreneurs of creative industries. A hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the research hypotheses.

Findings

In congruence with the hypotheses, the findings demonstrated that venture performance in creative industries can be predicted by factors that affect conventional venture performance. Creative personality and professional network ties are regarded according to the empirical analysis presented in this paper as the factors with the highest impact.

Research limitations/implications

Data were pulled from female entrepreneurs in Greece, especially from the two biggest cities Athens and Thessaloniki. Consequently, it was precarious to fulfill the condition of generalizability. Additionally, a snowball sampling method was used, because of the absence of creative industries firms’ directory in Greece.

Originality/value

Based on authors’ knowledge and review, no prior study has examined predictors’ effect on creative industries venture performance.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Yi‐Fen Huang, Chung‐Jen Chen and Hsui‐Hui Chang

The purpose of this paper is to build up an evaluation framework for selecting creative industries into the new cultural creativity centre in Tainan city, Taiwan.

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1695

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to build up an evaluation framework for selecting creative industries into the new cultural creativity centre in Tainan city, Taiwan.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) method to evaluate the creative industries for the introduction and development in the new cultural creativity centre in Taiwan. Then, a sensitivity analysis is carried out to determine the critical factors that affected the priority of the alternatives.

Findings

In the seven evaluation criteria, “market potential” has the highest weight, followed by “regional development” and “culture improvement”. In the six industries, creative lifestyle, crafts, and creative design are the three most favourable industries chosen for the introduction and development in the new centre.

Research limitations

One possible limitation is the selection of experts in the research design. Although the participants selected in our study are experienced in the development of the cultural creativity centre and are across several disciplines, the representative of group members is still a critical issue.

Practical implications

The application of the model provides an avenue for government policy makers and researchers to deal effectively with the industry selection issue.

Originality/value

The model developed in this paper is a useful decision‐making tool for solving the selection problem of creative industries.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 15 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2020

Yanti Mayasari and Teddy Chandra

Th purpose of this paper is to represent the role of social capital for the knowledge management system (KMS) in the kind of literature which is related to the topics in…

Abstract

Purpose

Th purpose of this paper is to represent the role of social capital for the knowledge management system (KMS) in the kind of literature which is related to the topics in the creative industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses conceptual and literature study with empirical quantitative and qualitative investigation to validate. As some literature states that KMS is an organizational process and tool for acquisition, conversion, application and protection of existing knowledge as a way to use, develop and manage it which comes from internal and external organizations.

Findings

Literature shows that for some organizations, knowledge is gained through research and development (R&D) of the internal organization. In contrast, the creative industry requires knowledge that is derived from social capital such as social environment and community. The social environment and community (social capital) will provide knowledge that is required for the existence of the creative industry in producing the creative product that may represent the social context in which the creative industry exists. This study uses a meta-analysis as a tool of analysis to classify previous research and studies regarding the roles of social capital for KMS in the creative industry that were used as the cornerstone of the research.

Originality/value

Studies in the creative industry previously show that knowledge is a collaboration of tacit knowledge and explicit knowledge which is gained from various the creative classes within the industry. As a renewable resource-based industry, creativity, skill and talent are resources that are used to be commercialized to gain wealth for not only big industries but also for micro, small and medium economies (UMKM) that mostly done by communities, to create employment through the exploitation of intellectual property. Therefore, the creative industry can be meant as a knowledge-based industry that requires the application of KMS in its operation.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Ruth Bridgstock

Although there is increasing evidence that the creative industries are essential to national economic growth as well as social and cultural well‐being, creative graduates…

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7837

Abstract

Purpose

Although there is increasing evidence that the creative industries are essential to national economic growth as well as social and cultural well‐being, creative graduates often find it difficult to become established professionally. This study aims to investigate the value of career management competence and intrinsic career motivations (as elements of “protean career orientation”) in predicting positive graduate outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Self‐report surveys were administered to 208 creative industries graduates from two Australian universities at two points in time: at course completion, and one year later.

Findings

The paper finds that individual career management competence and intrinsic work motivations, measured at course completion, were significant predictors of early career success, using both subjective and objective measures, measured one year later.

Practical implications

This study suggests that an emphasis on student development beyond the traditional “key” employability skills may well be worthwhile. The paper also suggests a broad learning and teaching approach by which universities can encourage the development of student career identity, and thus engender student intrinsic career motivations and career self management skills and behaviours.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to demonstrate empirically a link between a particular set of skills and graduate outcomes. In addition, it provides insights into the role of student career motivations in positive transitions to the world of work in the creative industries.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 53 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Ian D. Parkman, Samuel S. Holloway and Helder Sebastiao

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, innovation capacity, and firm performance in the creative industries context.

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2218

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation, innovation capacity, and firm performance in the creative industries context.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses a survey‐based empirical analysis.

Findings

Innovation capacity mediates the relationship between entrepreneurial orientation and two different measures of firm performance in the creative industries.

Research limitations/implications

These results suggest that success in the creative industries requires significant alignment between the entrepreneurial management and creative capabilities of the firm. Firms must identify unique opportunities to exploit that will foster and best leverage their creative competencies.

Originality/value

In addition to providing initial insight on the relationship between entrepreneurial action, innovative capacity, and performance with the creative industries, the paper also is one of the first on the creative industries to focus on firm‐level strategy.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Peter Jones, Daphne Comfort, Ian Eastwood and David Hillier

States that the idea of grouping a number of cultural, commercial and industrial activities together under the banner of the “creative industries” is relatively new but…

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3324

Abstract

States that the idea of grouping a number of cultural, commercial and industrial activities together under the banner of the “creative industries” is relatively new but it has already been the focus of considerable interest, discussion and policy making within the UK. Acknowledges that the government has been keen to promote the creative industries as a major success story and a key element in the knowledge economy. Looks at what is seen to constitute the creative industries, reviews some of the evidence about their contribution to the economy and outlines some of the management challenges and the support and promotion initiatives associated with these industries.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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