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Schooling and Social Capital in Diverse Cultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-885-8

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Book part
Publication date: 12 December 2015

Eduardo Villanueva-Mansilla, Teresa Nakano and Inés Evaristo

As the deployment of ICT and the Internet especially increases all around the world, the urgency of providing access to the “have-nots” appears at least diminished, with…

Abstract

Purpose

As the deployment of ICT and the Internet especially increases all around the world, the urgency of providing access to the “have-nots” appears at least diminished, with new issues and urgencies at the forefront. However, studies show that even when the best conditions for access are established, not everyone uses their digital devices for the same purposes, even when sharing the same goals, or when participating in the same experiences.

Methodology/approach

To explore potential explanations of these phenomena, this study examines survey data from students from a private university in Peru regarding their backgrounds and expertise with ICT. We use the twin concepts of social and cultural capital to establish a connection between their larger lifeworld experiences and their use of digital media. For this purpose, we analyze the data using polychoric correlations to explore patterns resulting from self-perception of access and skills, as well as processes related to social capital such as differentiated media use.

Findings

Findings indicate that there are differentiated processes of capital accrual using ICTs, but, at the same time, the productive and leisure dimensions of ICT use must be considered.

Details

Communication and Information Technologies Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-381-5

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Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2013

Martin D. Munk

The purpose of this chapter is to reveal explanations for completing upper secondary education. Focus is on the mechanisms that drive attainment of upper secondary…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to reveal explanations for completing upper secondary education. Focus is on the mechanisms that drive attainment of upper secondary education. I analyze the relative contributions of different factors measured by the relative increases in the log likelihood function. I also investigate the importance of characteristics other than the traditional variables, such as fathers’ and mothers’ occupations, their education, and household income, often applied in studies of educational attainment. I used a recent 1984 cohort database with information about educational completion and an informative set of measurements on noncognitive capacities, parental cultural capital, cultural capital, reading score, several school-related variables, and a rich set of family background variables. Attainment of upper secondary education was analyzed by a multinomial logit model, showing that characteristics other than the traditional variables all have significant importance. The analysis clearly depicted that the social position and educational levels of both parents remain important in determining whether the child embarks on completing an upper secondary education. Additionally, noncognitive dispositions show to be very important in explaining educational attainment, even when controlling for family background and refined cultural capital variables. Therefore, society should direct more efforts towards establishing children's cognitive and noncognitive skills and their ability to focus on schoolwork along with building their beliefs. Parents should be involved in a more content-sensitive sense when raising their children.

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2020

Secil E. Ertorer, Jennifer Long, Melissa Fellin and Victoria M. Esses

This paper explores integration experiences of immigrants in the Canadian workplace from the perspective of immigrants themselves, focusing on cultural capital and cultural

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores integration experiences of immigrants in the Canadian workplace from the perspective of immigrants themselves, focusing on cultural capital and cultural judgments as factors influencing workplace entry, advancement and social integration in an increasingly diverse work environment.

Design/methodology/approach

An interpretive approach that involved thematic analysis of in-depth interview data was employed.

Findings

The findings reveal that the official two-way multiculturalism policy of Canada is not reflected in the Canadian workplace and that structural forces of assimilation are evident. Cultural judgments and immigrants' cultural capital create barriers for integration.

Research limitations/implications

While highlighting important aspects of immigrant experiences within the Canadian workplace, the study findings cannot generate a fully representative theorization of immigrant employment experiences in Canada. Further studies with diverse migrant groups in different parts of the country would shed more light on the issues faced by immigrants.

Practical implications

The barriers to social integration identified by this study can be largely overcome by improving intercultural skills and cultural intelligence of employers and employees through training and incorporating values of diversity and inclusion into the corporate culture.

Social implications

The factors that foster and hinder workplace integration identified by this study can inform workplace integration strategies and related policies.

Originality/value

Much of the literature concerning immigrants' position in Canada address the economic integration and economic well-being of immigrants, focusing on quantitative, macro level analyses of earnings disparity and labor market segmentation. There is a lack of qualitative research that explores the integration process through the lens of immigrants. Informed by the theories of cultural capital, cultural judgment and integration, the study sheds light on the everyday workplace experiences of skilled migrants and perceived barriers to workplace entry, advancement and social integration.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Annie Tubadji, Masood Gheasi and Peter Nijkamp

An interest in social transmission as a source of welfare and income inequality in a society has re-emerged recently with new vigour in leading economic research (see…

Abstract

Purpose

An interest in social transmission as a source of welfare and income inequality in a society has re-emerged recently with new vigour in leading economic research (see Piketty, 2014). This paper presents a mixed Bourdieu-Mincer (B-M) type micro-economic model which provides a testable mechanism for culturally biased socio-economic inter-generational transmission. In particular, the operationalisation of this mixed B-M type model seeks to find evidence for individual and local cultural capital effects on the economic achievements, in addition to the human capital effect, for both migrants and locals in the Netherlands. The purpose of this paper is to examine two sources of wage differential in the local labour market, namely: individual cultural capital (approximated by immigrant background), which affects schooling results; and the local cultural capital (approximated with the cultural milieu), which directly biases the selection of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilises the 2007-2009 data set for higher professional education (in Dutch termed HBO) graduates registered in the Maastricht database. The Mincer-type equation is augmented with a control variable for the local cultural milieu. The authors cope with this model empirically by means of 2SLS and 3SLS methods.

Findings

The authors find convincing evidence for the existence of both an individual cultural capital and a local cultural capital effect on schooling and wage differentials. This can be interpreted as a migrant background effect leading to a disadvantaged position on the labour market due to less frequently attending high-quality secondary schools.

Originality/value

More importantly, the authors find evidence for a classical Myrdalian effect of self-fulfilling prophecy, in which graduates with second-generation migrant background have a disadvantaged position due to access only to poorer quality of schooling.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Jane Glover, Donna Champion, Kevin Daniels and Grahame Boocock

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how small firms work at a micro-level, applying Bourdieu’s Capital Theory to give insight into the way individuals use the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how small firms work at a micro-level, applying Bourdieu’s Capital Theory to give insight into the way individuals use the social and cultural capital at their disposal, to innovate and solve problems.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied qualitative methods to explore problem solving and innovation activities at the micro-level in small firms, using interviews and thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings reveal that, compared to firms with lower levels of social and cultural capital, firms which possess higher levels of social and cultural capital have a higher success rate in problem solving and are more likely to engage in innovative activity. Social and cultural capitals complement and reinforce one another in small firms, for example an enhanced ability to utilise networks (social capital) allows small firms to access a greater diversity of knowledge (cultural capital).

Originality/value

Little is known about how different forms of capital are utilised in the day-to-day operations and problem solving of small firms: the application of Bourdieu’s Capital Theory offered an original frame in which to explore these activities.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1999

George D. Thompson

Perceived increases in the proportion of human capital in the production mix are matched by calls for the development of methods of accounting for human capital. The term …

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3633

Abstract

Perceived increases in the proportion of human capital in the production mix are matched by calls for the development of methods of accounting for human capital. The term “capital” is used in a range of academic and professional fields. Cultural capital is a term from sociology, closely related in meaning to human capital and human resources, but providing a unique perspective of its own. This paper suggests that, by reaching outside the traditional economic rationality of the discourse on human resources or human capital, cultural capital provides insights for accounting. In particular, it suggests that a form of human resource accounting based on cultural capital is needed to reflect the plural authority and accountability structures of organizations.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Kerry London, Jessica Chen and Nathaniel Bavinton

The aim of the paper is to investigate the architectural firm's role in the briefing process on international projects and to identify the strategies of successful firms…

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1305

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to investigate the architectural firm's role in the briefing process on international projects and to identify the strategies of successful firms to overcome barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed based on a critique of briefing models and international design management theory. The development of a reflexive capability model borrows cultural theory concepts of capital and reflexivity. The model is based on maximizing reflexive capability through the management of social, cultural and intellectual capital. Two case studies of architectural firms identify barriers during the briefing process and strategies to overcome these barriers. Data collection involved 16 interviews with senior management and design team staff.

Findings

There are various barriers and strategies used to achieve success in the briefing process. However, the management of a firm's capital is key to successful briefing on international projects and is a characteristic of reflexive practice. Reflexivity is based in a positive interpretation of change, and a continual responsiveness to change by participants in a system. The study provides useful information on management of the design and briefing stages of international projects.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited by the number of case studies used and the difficulty of generalisability of findings.

Practical implications

The research is that it provides useful information about how to approach constant change during briefing for the architects and clients who work on international projects.

Originality/value

The model is original and has value as it assists in explaining why some firms are more successful than others. The case studies provide new knowledge on international projects and the briefing process. The value of the paper is for the academic community, professionals in the built environment and clients involved in international projects.

Details

Facilities, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Alberto Bucci, Pier Luigi Sacco and Giovanna Segre

Despite the growing literature aimed at explaining how cultural and artistic production feeds economic growth, the causal relationships and interplays are not investigated…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing literature aimed at explaining how cultural and artistic production feeds economic growth, the causal relationships and interplays are not investigated in depth. In the attempt of filling this gap, the purpose of this paper is to examine arts, culture, and education within the framework of the New Growth Theory.

Design/methodology/approach

Starting from the analysis of how culture may be at the root of a specific engine of economic growth, the paper presents a theoretical endogenous growth model driven by the combination of the investments in human and cultural capital.

Findings

The paper shows that cultural investment has a positive impact on economic growth and on the level of income provided that the economy is sufficiently “culture-intensive”, and that this effect is further magnified the more total factor productivity (TFP) is sensitive to the stock of cultural capital.

Research limitations/implications

The paper figures out the possibility of a cultural poverty trap as the cause of poor growth performance of some economies in the current post-industrial scenario. Culturally poor economies tend to grow slowly because of the lack of cultural exposure, which makes TFP poor since human capita is weakly inclined to be used in innovative, flexible ways.

Originality/value

The paper presents a new endogenous growth model. The paper argues that the available endogenous growth models fail to take into account the full set of relevant factors that make endogenous growth possible, and that the missing entry is cultural capital.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Nirwana Nirwana

This paper aims to discuss about whether human capital and cultural capital affect the financial condition of a region and whether cultural capital has a mediating effect…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to discuss about whether human capital and cultural capital affect the financial condition of a region and whether cultural capital has a mediating effect (mediator) on the effect of human capital on the financial condition of a region. Moreover, this research also refines previous research by combining the simultaneous effect of the variables human capital and cultural capital on the financial condition of a region and examining the mediating effect of the variable cultural capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Research was conducted at the Regional Apparatus Work Unit (SKPD) in the Area of South Sulawesi Province with a total population of up to 630. The inferential statistical analysis using the method of variance-based structural equation modeling (SEM) is known as partial least squares SEM.

Findings

Human capital has positive influence on cultural capital. The higher human capital, primarily reflected in the work experience, will result in increasing the capital of culture in the working environment of local government in the province of South Sulawesi.

Originality/value

Originality of this paper is as follows: an inferential method used in this research is an SEM. The location of the research located in of the Regional Apparatus Work Unit (SKPD) in the Area of South Sulawesi Province, Indonesia, Indonesia which there has not been research by the methods and the same location.

Details

International Journal of Law and Management, vol. 60 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-243X

Keywords

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