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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2010

Michael L. Kasavana, Khaldoon Nusair and Katherine Teodosic

Although the inplementation of online social networking (OSN) within the hospitality industry is relatively new, its parameters possess unique implications for hospitality…

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Abstract

Purpose

Although the inplementation of online social networking (OSN) within the hospitality industry is relatively new, its parameters possess unique implications for hospitality industry constituencies including guests, staff members, and management. The purpose of this paper is to examine the evolution, scope and types of online social networks and potential implications for hospitality businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an in‐depth review of literature, including intended and unintended consequences of social media.

Findings

While social networking can assist a hospitality firm in strengthening guest loyalty and satisfaction, it may also expose itself to unfair criticism and unfounded speculation. In addition, some hospitality firms have sponsored coworker sites in an attempt to incentivize interactivity by encouraging peer‐to‐peer and staff‐to‐administrator participation, only to risk exposure of negative relationships and strained working conditions.

Research limitations/implications

The literature related to hospitality OSNs is relatively sparse and thus this paper is intended to provide a basis for future investigation.

Originality/value

The literature related to hospitality OSNs is relatively sparse and thus this paper is intended to provide a basis for future investigation.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2005

Bonnie J. Knutson, Jeffrey A. Beck, Arjun J. Singh, Michael L. Kasavana and Ronald F. Cichy

This article presents findings of a Delphi study that predicts events most likely to impact marketing to consumers in lodging, food service and clubs segments for year 2007. Two…

Abstract

This article presents findings of a Delphi study that predicts events most likely to impact marketing to consumers in lodging, food service and clubs segments for year 2007. Two rounds of questionnaires were mailed to panels of industry experts within each sector, with an overall response rate of 42%. Findings suggest that the two overarching marketing trends will be convenience as a driver of consumer choice and marketing to an aging population.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-310-5

Case study
Publication date: 1 August 2018

Debjit Roy, Mukund Raut, Sanchit Agrawal and Shubham Agrawal

Takshshila, the owner of Sandwichworkz, a trendy restaurant in Ahmedabad, India, is worried about the diminishing profitability of her restaurant. Recent promotional offers have…

Abstract

Takshshila, the owner of Sandwichworkz, a trendy restaurant in Ahmedabad, India, is worried about the diminishing profitability of her restaurant. Recent promotional offers have increased the footfall, but not profitability. To address this issue, she knew she had to optimize and redesign their menu. She also realizes that to properly address this issue, they would beed to take into account factors such as popularity of each menu item and their per unit profitability. She contacts Nick, a restaurant consultant who further dwells into calculating the costs involved in making each item, to determine the per unit profitability. He proposed plotting the popularity vs. popularity graph (as per Kasavana Smith model) and making qyadrant specific re-enginering decisions. Post his analysis using this menu re-engineering tool, he calls Takshshila with his recommendations. During the call, they come across a new costing methodology which may affect his recommendations. Which methodology should Nick use? Should Takshshila invest in capturing data for the new methodology?

Details

Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2633-3260
Published by: Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 March 2010

Cihan Cobanoglu

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2005

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-310-5

Book part
Publication date: 3 March 2005

Abstract

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-310-5

Book part
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Georgina Lukanova and Galina Ilieva

Purpose: This paper presents a review of the current state and potential capabilities for application of robots, artificial intelligence and automated services (RAISA) in hotel…

Abstract

Purpose: This paper presents a review of the current state and potential capabilities for application of robots, artificial intelligence and automated services (RAISA) in hotel companies.

Design/methodology/approach: A two-step approach was applied in this study. First, the authors make a theoretical overview of the robots, artificial intelligence and service automation (RAISA) in hotels. Second, the authors make a detailed overview of various case studies from global hotel practice.

Findings: The application of RAISA in hotel companies is examined in connection with the impact that technology has on guest experience during each of the five stages of the guest cycle: pre-arrival, arrival, stay, departure, assessment.

Research implications: Its implications can be searched with respect to future research. It deals with topics such as how different generations (guests and employees) perceive RAISA in the hotel industry and what is the attitude of guests in different categories of hotels (luxury and economy) towards the use of RAISA. It also shows what is the attitude of different types of tourists (holiday, business, health, cultural, etc.) and what kinds of robots (androids or machines) are more appropriate for different types of hotel operations.

Practical implications: The implications are related to the improvement of operations and operational management, marketing and sales, enhancement of customer experience and service innovation, training and management.

Originality/value: This book chapter complements and expands research on the role of RAISA in the hotel industry and makes some projections about the use of technologies in the future.

Details

Robots, Artificial Intelligence, and Service Automation in Travel, Tourism and Hospitality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-688-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Kanwalroop Kathy Dhanda

This paper aims to explore the area of carbon offsets and carbon neutrality within the context of hotels and resorts. In theory, carbon markets assist organizations in reducing…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the area of carbon offsets and carbon neutrality within the context of hotels and resorts. In theory, carbon markets assist organizations in reducing their carbon footprint by purchasing carbon offsets. This conceptual paper aims to explore this market, analyze its operations and evaluate the participants. The expectation is that this original research will provide a foundation for analyzing this market to make sense of the widely disparate views about carbon neutrality held by companies in the hospitality sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The research study aimed to uncover what claims are currently made about carbon neutrality, what properties are making these claims and are these claims legitimate? A broad Internet search was conducted to collect a sample of hotels and resorts that marketed carbon neutrality as a feature of their properties. Next, a five-point Likert type scale was constructed to analyze every hotel and resort in terms of legitimate reflection of market performance challenges or dimensions. In this study, the hotels that claim to be “Carbon Neutral” were scored according to four market performance dimensions: project quality, carbon calculations, quality information of providers and price per ton of carbon offset.

Findings

The paper’s findings offer a twofold contribution. First, hotels and resorts interested in entering the offset market can use the results as strategic information to bolster efforts to achieve legitimacy and viability in this market. Second, the findings offer a benefit to consumers concerned to reduce their carbon footprint, as the results include a determination of the best hotels and resorts in terms of carbon neutrality.

Research limitations/implications

This research found that the claim “carbon neutral” is used often to attract green consumers. The spectrum of claims ranged from hotels presenting comprehensive carbon management plans or online carbon footprint applications, to hotels that had minimal information and used the “carbon neutral” for marketing purposes only. In numerous cases, the claim of carbon neutrality is not substantiated and, in this case, might be construed as greenwashing.

Practical implications

The findings indicate that claims of carbon neutrality can be exaggerated and that the consumers must themselves be educated to be aware of claims that are unfounded.

Originality/value

Given the large and rising number of offset providers in the unregulated carbon offset industry and the hotel industry, this contribution promises to offer value. This study is one of the first formal analyses of carbon offsets in the hospitality market. The author hopes that this study will encourage others to research the growing market of voluntary carbon offsets further.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Dobromir Stoyanov

This study identifies the conventional elements of the vending marketing mix and how they vary across academic segments in the context of a typical French university.

Abstract

Purpose

This study identifies the conventional elements of the vending marketing mix and how they vary across academic segments in the context of a typical French university.

Design/methodology/approach

To determine the elements of the vending marketing mix, the author conducts interviews with international industry experts and undertake 170 direct observations at various universities to verify the differences between the marketing mix proposals of dissimilar target markets.

Findings

The results reveal significant variances across all elements of the marketing mix, with distribution characteristics being the most frequently adapted element across various markets, followed by promotion- and product-related parameters, while pricing characteristics are most commonly standardised.

Research limitations/implications

Vending operators should pay particular attention to marketing decisions related to the product assortment length, selection of appropriate locations, availability of smart payment options and feedback communication channels. The results reveal significant variances across all elements of the marketing mix indicating that vending operators apply strategies to reach different market segments. However, there is a high degree of standardisation within vending channels.

Originality/value

Though vending channels are an important retail format, prior studies do not investigate their marketing mixes. This is the first attempt to empirically establish the conventional elements of the vending marketing mix and to measure its variation across customer segments.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2014

Jungsun (Sunny) Kim and Bo Bernhard

This paper aims to extend the technology acceptance model (TAM) to explore the factors influencing a hotel customer’s intention to use a fingerprint system instead of a…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to extend the technology acceptance model (TAM) to explore the factors influencing a hotel customer’s intention to use a fingerprint system instead of a traditional keycard system and the moderating factors (i.e. gender and age) on the relationships between the proposed factors and the customer’s intention to use fingerprint technology. When hotels add new technologies, the potential vulnerability of their systems also increases. Underestimating such risks can possibly result in massive losses from identity theft and related fraud for hoteliers. Customers who are aware of these risks may become more open to innovative methods of identification or verification, such as biometrics.

Design/methodology/approach

The online survey instrument was developed based on TAMs. The authors collected complete 526 responses from hotel customers and tested the hypotheses using structural equation modeling.

Findings

This study found seven factors (i.e. perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, subjective norm, perceived convenience, perceived data security, perceived property security and personal concerns) which significantly influence a hotel customer’s intention to use fingerprint technology. Gender and age played important moderating roles in the relationships between some of these factors and the intention to use.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made as to how hotels can benefit from the implementation of biometrics, particularly fingerprint systems. For example, a hotel’s marketing campaign can be more effective by emphasizing the advantages of fingerprint technology related to “data security and convenience” for younger consumers (i.e. Gen X and Gen Y).

Originality/value

Both educators and practitioners will benefit from the findings of this empirical study, as there are very few published studies on a customer’s fingerprint technology acceptance in the hotel context.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Technology, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-9880

Keywords

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