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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Ui‐Jeen Yu and Grace I. Kunz

The purpose of this study is to examine the ability of supply chain merchandise replenishment strategies to minimize merchandise plan errors when assortments are diverse.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the ability of supply chain merchandise replenishment strategies to minimize merchandise plan errors when assortments are diverse.

Design/methodology/approach

Sourcing Simulator 2.1, a computer simulation of the merchandising process, was used. Sourcing Simulator generated a total data set of 4,320 and determined financial outcomes of the merchandising processes based on multiple scenario inputs.

Findings

The impact of supply chain merchandise replenishment strategies on merchandising performance outcomes significantly differed, depending on assortment diversity and merchandise plan errors. The ability of supply chain merchandise replenishment strategies was limited in minimizing problems inherent in diverse assortments and over‐volume errors.

Research limitations/implications

Sourcing Simulator does not necessarily simulate merchandising processes and performance in real retail stores but principles developed through simulation can be applied in retail stores. Future research based on real information is suggested for additional realistic understanding.

Practical implications

The study suggests that apparel and retail firms should develop both up‐front assortment planning and replenishment strategies, considering the level of assortment diversity.

Originality/value

Based on Behavioral Theory of the Apparel Firm, the study contributes to understanding the importance of merchandising functions in an apparel firm. In addition, the study illuminates assortment diversity as an important factor of merchandise planning, especially when apparel and retail firms plan replenishment strategies to minimize merchandise plan errors.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Grace I. Kunz and Dana Rupe

Assortment planning, the determination of the range of choices to be made available at a given time, is a primary merchandising function. Many people with different job…

Abstract

Assortment planning, the determination of the range of choices to be made available at a given time, is a primary merchandising function. Many people with different job titles in both apparel manufacturing and retailing make decisions that impact merchandise assortments. The purpose of this paper is to explain the concept of assortment diversity as measured by volume per stock‐keeping unit for an assortment (VSA), describe the relationship of VSA to per cent gross margin (%GM), and propose topics for further research.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Seung‐Eun Lee and Grace I. Kunz

The purpose of this study was to contribute to merchandising theory development by testing and refining Rupe and Kunz’s Volume per Stock‐keeping unit for an Assortment

1243

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to contribute to merchandising theory development by testing and refining Rupe and Kunz’s Volume per Stock‐keeping unit for an Assortment (VSA) and Assortment Diversity Index(ADI), using multiple merchandising performance measures. Behavioural Theory of the Apparel Firm with a Quick Response construct (BTAF/QR), was used as the theoretical framework for the study. The data were generated by a computer simulation of the merchandising process called Sourcing Simulator. Statistical analyses included Pearson correlation coefficients and regressions. The VSA had significant correlations with all 14 merchandising performance measures (p < 0:001), and the ADI was a consistent indicator of financial productivity considering all 14 merchandising performance measures. The results of the study supported the proposal of additional assumptions as well as propositions and hypotheses related to merchandising responsibility for BTAF/QR.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 May 2013

Warin Chotekorakul and James Nelson

The purpose of this study is to examine customer orientation and fashion merchandising competencies to learn which strategic option has a stronger relationship with…

2229

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine customer orientation and fashion merchandising competencies to learn which strategic option has a stronger relationship with retailer financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross‐sectional survey was used to collect self‐report data from a random sample of 275 small specialty retailers of women's clothing in Bangkok. Retailers offer similar merchandise assortments and customer services in dense, highly competitive, agglomerative environments. The survey form contained multi‐item scales measuring customer orientation, fashion merchandising competencies, and store financial performance. Bivariate correlations, multiple regression coefficients, and hierarchical linear model coefficients describe relationships of interest, controlling for retailer location.

Findings

Results show medium to large effect sizes for several fashion merchandising competencies but no substantive effects for the two customer orientation constructs. Effect sizes depend on whether financial performance is measured subjectively or as retailer return on investment or as probability of retailer survival.

Research limitations/implications

Data are restricted in range and reported effect sizes are smaller than true effect sizes. Data also are influenced by common method variance, influencing reported effect sizes in an opposite direction. Effect sizes may or may not describe causal relationships because of the study's cross‐sectional design. Because of the study's setting in Bangkok, results must be extended to similar retail settings with caution. Results indicate that a clustered fashion retailer can improve financial performance by striving for a fashion leadership position, anticipating fashion trends, and offering merchandise assortments in terms of styles and usages. Results indicate that a clustered fashion retailer will have difficulty improving financial performance via customer service and CRM activities.

Originality/value

Few studies in fashion retailing address predictors of financial performance at the individual store level. The authors help fill this knowledge gap by examining relationships between customer service activities, CRM activities, and key merchandising competencies and retailer subjective financial performance, return on investment, and probability of survival. Retailers compete in a spatially confined area, facilitating comparison shopping and heightening rivalries between retailers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Lawrence H. Wortzel

Since nearly all types of consumer products end up in retail stores, the retail scene affects a wide range of businesses. However, retailers are competing in a marketplace…

1073

Abstract

Since nearly all types of consumer products end up in retail stores, the retail scene affects a wide range of businesses. However, retailers are competing in a marketplace characterized by maturity, overcapacity, intense price competition, and an essential “sameness” among stores. Retailers will need new strategies to be successful.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Myron Gable, Martin T. Topol, Vishal Lala and Susan S. Fiorito

The purpose of this paper is to determine the responses of women college students to discount stores and category killers in terms of the importance of seven‐store…

2325

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine the responses of women college students to discount stores and category killers in terms of the importance of seven‐store characteristics as well as their expectations for these attributes. Another purpose was to determine differences, if any, between these two store formats. Further the moderating variables of shopping frequency and orientation were introduced to determine if they influenced the results.

Design/methodology/approach

Personal interviews were used to collect data from a random sample of women college students from one university through the administration of a structured survey instrument. Statistical analyses were employed to generate the results.

Findings

Differences were found in the respondents' perceptions for both importance and expectations for six of the seven‐store attributes. For one characteristic, continuity of supply, no differences emerged and this characteristic was deemed important for both store formats. Moderating variables did not alter the results.

Research limitations/implications

Given the limited nature of the sample, there is a need for replication of this research in other geographic regions, including international sites in order to corroborate these findings. Also, replication with men is needed.

Practical implications

This study provides guidance to both discount store and category killer executives on the types of strategies and tactics needed to better attract and retain women college students.

Originality/value

Attention was directed to women college students, a highly desired but often neglected market segment. Further, continuity of supply, an attribute not often indicated in most retailing texts emerged as very important and highly expected by respondents.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 36 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 October 2015

Elisa d'Avolio, Romeo Bandinelli, Margherita Pero and Rinaldo Rinaldi

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how luxury Italian fashion companies manage the replenishment process, and how they leverage supply chain (SC) to be able to…

1740

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how luxury Italian fashion companies manage the replenishment process, and how they leverage supply chain (SC) to be able to match supply and demand of fashion products.

Design/methodology/approach

Literature review was the first step performed; then, a case study research has been conducted in order to have a comprehensive view of the real context of luxury Italian fashion companies concerning merchandise planning and replenishment processes. After the sample was individuated, a questionnaire has guided the interviews and then data have been collected. Analysing data has concerned a primary case analysis and then cross-case patterns have been searched. Finally, several variables coherent to the aim of the study have been pinpointed and a framework has been designed.

Findings

The paper provides a characterization of the luxury Italian fashion industry concerning merchandise planning constraints and the replenishment processes. To guarantee the flexibility required to match supply and demand when there is a high percentage of seasonal products in the collection, companies leverage on both downstream and upstream SC alignment.

Originality/value

The enhancement of performance within the fashion SC is a topic not too much examined in depth, in particular referring to the luxury fashion companies and to the Italian context. Aligning upstream and downstream activities, information sharing between vendor and retailer and securing strategic alliances with the suppliers constitute important steps to reach flexibility and reactivity and to be in step with the market needs. The paper provides valuable insights to companies that are trying to decrease their lost sales and to increase their sell-out and customer service through a review of their SC processes.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 43 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2019

Supachart Iamratanakul

The purpose of this chapter is to identify and analyze various critical success factors (CSFs) that can facilitate retailing business in Thailand. This chapter further…

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is to identify and analyze various critical success factors (CSFs) that can facilitate retailing business in Thailand. This chapter further aims to understand the mutual interactions among these CSFs through identification of the hierarchical relationships among them. A framework for Thai retailers has been developed, wherein the hierarchical interrelationships between identified CSFs have been presented and interpreted using total interpretive structural modeling (TISM). Cross-impact matrix multiplication applied to classification analysis has been further employed to identify the driving power as well as dependence power of these CSFs. In the present research, 15 CSFs have been identified through literature review and expert opinions. The methodology employed in this study provides a mechanism to conduct an exploratory study by identifying the factors and analyzing their interactions through the development of a hierarchical framework. The proposed framework developed through qualitative modeling is an effort to understand relevant factors that can apply to the Thai retailers. This study makes a significant contribution in the literature of retailing business, which captures the perspective of different customers.

Details

Asia-Pacific Contemporary Finance and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-273-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Mary W. Mhango and Linda S. Niehm

This preliminary study describes the Malawi second‐hand clothing market and recommends strategies for improved distribution by entrepreneurs. We explore the potential for…

5010

Abstract

Purpose

This preliminary study describes the Malawi second‐hand clothing market and recommends strategies for improved distribution by entrepreneurs. We explore the potential for formal retailing of second‐hand clothing in Malawi and present avenues for further research on the topic.

Design/methodology/approach

A critical content analysis was conducted using data from secondary sources. Data reduction, data display, conclusion drawing, and verification allowed for organization and compression of information, and assisted in identification of research gaps.

Findings

Preliminary findings suggest organizational structure and effective distribution channel relationships may lead small‐scale entrepreneurial ventures to grow in the Malawi formal market. It is apparent that second‐hand clothing retail entrepreneurs have significant location and resource advantages to leverage in the Malawi domestic market.

Research limitations/implications

This analysis was based on limited literature given the undocumented nature of Malawi retailing and the second‐hand apparel market. Potential research phases that could build from this study includes ethnographic study of current second‐hand clothing distribution and consumption practices in the Malawi context, stakeholders' perspectives on formalizing the second‐hand clothing trade, and a feasibility study on entrepreneurial training and start‐up program for small formal retailers of second‐hand apparel.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the second‐hand clothing trade as an under researched area with much fruitful potential for future study. Also the proposed framework for understanding retail development and distribution of second‐hand clothing from an embedded market perspective may be transferable to other developing nations who rely heavily on second‐hand clothing to meet consumer apparel needs.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2012

Wei Guan, Jakob Rehme and Tomas Nord

To understand the potential for various types of retailers, it is essential to appreciate retailer' positioning in the marketplace. Positioning has a critical effect on…

2537

Abstract

Purpose

To understand the potential for various types of retailers, it is essential to appreciate retailer' positioning in the marketplace. Positioning has a critical effect on retailers' competitiveness and performance. Despite the significance and popularity of retail positioning, a few gaps remain that prompt the need for this research. First, little has been written about positioning in the building materials distribution industry, as compared with other retail sectors. Second, the retail classification literature has rarely included positioning as a dimension of retailer characteristics, although, in essence, they are both ways to understand retailer strategy and behaviour. To fill these research gaps, the objective of this research is to contribute to retail positioning research, using the Swedish building material distribution industry as a study setting. Specifically, it has two key goals: to develop a classification framework focusing on the Swedish building material distribution market; and to analyse those distributors by strategic groups and identify their common business priorities.

Design/methodology/approach

This research looked at a majority of building material distributors in the Swedish market. A total of 23 interviews were conducted with managing directors or similar from case companies. Interviews ranged from 40 to 90 minutes in duration. This research adapted materials developed for other purposes in order to enhance and strengthen primary data.

Findings

This study develops a classification framework of building material distributors and provides an overview of distributors operating in the Swedish markets. Drawing on theory from retail positioning and classification, the research result suggests that the studied distributors can be classified into three strategic groups: DIY‐service focused; DIY‐cost focused; and builders' merchant (BM)‐service focused. Research also showed that distinguishing building material distributor by customer type is not as effective as it once was; there is a trend of internationalisation in the Swedish building material distribution industry; and distributors exert growing central control over certain areas, such as purchasing and marketing.

Originality/value

The building material distribution industry attracts little research attention when compared to other sectors, for instance food and grocery retailing. Given this, the value of this article lies in identifying the leading companies in Sweden and offering strategic analysis of their business developments and focus. Insights into building material distributors' supply requirements are provided.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 40 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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