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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1978

John Gattorna

Channels of distribution are basic to the marketing strategies of firms, and have been shown to be a key element in the marketing mix. The author here undertakes a…

Abstract

Channels of distribution are basic to the marketing strategies of firms, and have been shown to be a key element in the marketing mix. The author here undertakes a comprehensive review of channels literature, primarily to identify and assess the adequacy of the various mainstream conceptual schemes which have emerged. Economic‐based arguments have largely been at the core of channels literature, although these have been partially offset by the concepts of the organisational and behavioural schools. The author concludes that whereas every conceptual approach reviewed has added something to our cumulative knowledge, no single approach has yet reached a point of adequate conceptualisation based on his own basic criteria. As yet channels literature is mainly descriptive, and has virtually no predictive power.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Matheus Alberto Cônsoli and Marcos Fava Neves

The aim is to describe the analysis conducted by a leading company in the dairy (yogurt and fermented milk) sector in Brazil regarding the decision to implement a…

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3735

Abstract

Purpose

The aim is to describe the analysis conducted by a leading company in the dairy (yogurt and fermented milk) sector in Brazil regarding the decision to implement a door‐to‐door distribution channel, in which one of the authors was involved.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief overview of the marketing channels is presented and the descriptive case study method was used to present the main company information.

Findings

The paper describes the decision‐making process that was used to define how basic services like breaking bulks, product variety, special convenience and wait time should be performed in this case. It also emphasizes the main channel decisions, the channel objectives and the chosen door‐to‐door structure for the company described in the case study.

Research limitations/implications

Even though case analysis has a theoretical background, the decision process used here cannot be generalized, being only a guide for academics and practitioners about how company A addressed the direct marketing issue.

Originality/value

The paper presents specific analysis of the Brazilian yogurt market and use as theoretical background the strategic environmental analysis. As a real case, it can be useful for practitioners as reference for decision making, as well for teaching purposes for case studies with college and MBA students. Finally, the paper presents as main contribution a “method for developing new marketing channels”.

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Direct Marketing: An International Journal, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-5933

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Megha Jain, Shadab Khalil, Angelina Nhat‐Hanh Le and Julian Ming‐Sung Cheng

This study aims to provide insights into glocalisation of international channels of distribution. The study also seeks to identify the key principles and patterns of…

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7238

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights into glocalisation of international channels of distribution. The study also seeks to identify the key principles and patterns of glocalisation in general.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilise the single case study approach to study glocalisation in international channels of distribution by conducting in‐depth interviews with the firm's senior executives.

Findings

Results reveal that the firm employs glocal channels of distribution strategies. The study specifically identifies two types of glocalisation: inter‐decision and intra‐decision, and it is found that the firm follows a combination of both. The findings also suggest that the decision on how to glocalise channel strategies is based upon the firm's global practices as well as several local conditions specific to individual markets.

Practical implications

The study concludes that there is no uniform formula to pursue glocalisation. Firms may choose to pursue inter‐decision or intra‐decision glocalisation, or a combination of both. However, the decision should be based on a careful assessment of the firm's global philosophy, the channel decision involved, and ground realities in each market.

Originality/value

The study shows how glocalisation can be applied to international channel strategies. The study fills the gap in prior literature by throwing light on the lesser understood “global dimension” of a glocal strategy. The study may be the first to identify different types of glocal strategies and thus offers relevant insights into the concept of glocalisation. The study also adds to the limited knowledge on practicable application of glocalisation among both academics and practitioners.

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Chenchi Zhang, Jieqiong Wang, Biao Zhang, Junqi Ding, Zetian Fu and Lingxian Zhang

The selection of marketing channels by vegetable producers directly affects the income of producers and is important for the maintenance of a stable supply of vegetables…

Abstract

Purpose

The selection of marketing channels by vegetable producers directly affects the income of producers and is important for the maintenance of a stable supply of vegetables and food control. The purpose of this paper is threefold: to investigate the cooperative selection of vegetable marketing channels; to identify the factors that influence the selection of marketing channels by professional vegetable cooperatives by comparing emerging and traditional circulation modes; and to solve the problems related to vegetable circulation channels in Beijing.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 187 valid questionnaires were collected from seven main vegetable production districts in Beijing urban areas from September to December 2017, with a response rate of 89 percent. Binary logistic regression was used for analysis in this study.

Findings

Results revealed that the cooperatives mainly selected large wholesalers, wholesale markets, supermarkets and electronic commerce as their marketing channels for their vegetables. Estimation results showed that among the 18 influencing factors in the four categories, the educational level of the person in charge and some other factors significantly influence the selection of these four distribution channels by the cooperatives.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the lack of time and energy, this paper does not analyze the factors influencing a cooperative’s choice of different e-commerce platforms. If this problem can be solved, it will definitely promote the development of e-commerce in rural areas.

Originality/value

The results obtained in the present study and their implications could help policy makers establish a science-based and reasonable policy to encourage vegetable producers to participate in the new circulation modes of vegetables in Beijing and ensure their income in the vegetable supply chain. This study suggests methods to improve the vegetable sector in other cities facing similar issues.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 March 2008

Calin Gurau and Franck Duquesnois

The paper's objective is to investigate the relation between direct and indirect marketing channels applied by French wine producers, and to identify the elements that can…

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3734

Abstract

Purpose

The paper's objective is to investigate the relation between direct and indirect marketing channels applied by French wine producers, and to identify the elements that can enhance the success of direct distribution methods.

Design/methodology/approach

Secondary data collected though a questionnaire survey, and published in a study of Viniflhor was analysed in order to identify the distribution channels used by French wine producers. In the second part of the study, primary qualitative data obtained through face‐to‐face interviews with 17 wine producers was used to explore their direct marketing approach.

Findings

The findings indicated that French wine producers use a large variety of both direct and indirect marketing channels, although the importance of these distribution methods varies with the size of the producer (defined in terms of vineyard area and wine production). An integrated distribution strategy is applied by more than a half of the respondents. Although the strategic planning process is applied informally and intuitively, a series of innovative elements are combined in order to enhance the value of the product offer and to develop long‐term relationships with satisfied customers.

Research limitations/implications

The low response rate obtained in the application of data collection methods raises questions regarding the possibility to generalize the findings to the entire population of study.

Originality/value

The paper applies a three layer analysis to the situation of the French wine producers from various regions, creatively combining focused investigation with an integrative perspective.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2015

Florence Olu Ogunrin and Anthony U Inegbenebor

The purpose of this paper is to examine the distribution channels used by a Nigerian sample of apparel producers and investigate the association between the channels in…

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1206

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the distribution channels used by a Nigerian sample of apparel producers and investigate the association between the channels in use and the sample’s export involvement. In this era of sophisticated computer- and internet-mediated marketing practices, the larger proportion of entrepreneurs in developing economies still deploy largely informal marketing practices. Countries indeed have adopted the marketing revolution to varying degrees, consistent with prevailing level of development.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured interview schedule was used in collecting data from 111 apparel entrepreneurs.

Findings

Most of the respondents were domestic market-focused haute couture producers or low-volume producers of ready-to-wear (r-t-w) clothing who supply institutions or boutiques, using direct channels. Only a few export, mainly through ethnic-commercial networks involving overseas-based family/friends.

Practical implications

For now, current distribution channels seem adequate for the personal and business goals of these entrepreneurs. However, large-volume clothing exporting through formal global distribution channels is what drives industrialization and development. These apparel entrepreneurs therefore require institutional assistance to link up with formal global marketing channels. It is only then that the industry would serve similar development roles as witnessed in other emerging economies which have climbed the development ladder through export of labour-intensive manufactures like clothing.

Originality/value

The study confirmed earlier observations about apparel exporting in Nigeria, such as prevalent use of informal channels, and also draws attention to less-known details, including the existence of fledgling local trade intermediaries, “disappointed exporters” and an emerging group (yet miniscule) of exporters who utilize more formalized channels.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Gregory T. Gundlach, Yemisi A. Bolumole, Reham A. Eltantawy and Robert Frankel

The paper seeks to examine the changing landscape of supply chain management, marketing channels of distribution, logistics and purchasing.

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11193

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to examine the changing landscape of supply chain management, marketing channels of distribution, logistics and purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine and take stock of the changing nature and landscape surrounding the related disciplines of supply chain management, marketing channels of distribution, logistics and purchasing. This examination highlights the considerable evolution and significant advances occurring within and between these disciplines.

Findings

The authors find that this new landscape provides both opportunities and challenges for future scholarship and practice in these related disciplines.

Originality/value

The examination and findings should be of value to those attempting to understand the evolving nature and interrelationship of these fields, and those who currently practise within them.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2018

Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Michael Harvey and Milorad M. Novicevic

Globalization of organizations necessitates the development of a network organizational configuration. This new form of organization requires managers to become boundary…

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3418

Abstract

Globalization of organizations necessitates the development of a network organizational configuration. This new form of organization requires managers to become boundary spanners between the various organizations aligned in the global business network. The question becomes how are these boundary‐spanning managers going to be identified and selected for global assignments. This paper examines the staffing options for marketing managers of integrative (i.e. relational) and market (i.e. transactional) modes of norm‐based control of global channels of distribution. Both transaction cost analysis and focus theory are used to identify which control mechanism would be most appropriate for each inter‐organizational situation.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

John Gattorna, Abby Day and John Hargreaves

Key components of the logistics mix are described in an effort tocreate an understanding of the total logistics concept. Chapters includean introduction to logistics; the…

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4384

Abstract

Key components of the logistics mix are described in an effort to create an understanding of the total logistics concept. Chapters include an introduction to logistics; the strategic role of logistics, customer service levels, channel relationships, facilities location, transport, inventory management, materials handling, interface with production, purchasing and materials management, estimating demand, order processing, systems performance, leadership and team building, business resource management.

Details

Logistics Information Management, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6053

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