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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2022

Guilherme Tortorella, Sherah Kurnia, Marcelo Trentin, Gilson Adamczuk Oliveira and Dalmarino Setti

This paper examines the relationship between different manufacturing strategies and Industry 4.0's (I4.0) critical success factors (CSFs) and technology adoption.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the relationship between different manufacturing strategies and Industry 4.0's (I4.0) critical success factors (CSFs) and technology adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

For that, the authors surveyed 165 practitioners from different manufacturers. Participants provided information about the levels of product customization and production volume in their companies. They also indicated the adoption level of I4.0 technologies and CSFs. Using multivariate data techniques, the authors identified four clusters of different manufacturing strategies and two readiness levels based on the establishment of I4.0 CSFs. The adoption level of I4.0 technologies was then cross compared among clusters to identify which technologies are more likely to be supported.

Findings

The findings indicate that, in low-readiness companies, the adoption level of I4.0 technologies does not significantly differ between manufacturing strategies. However, when companies present a higher I4.0 readiness, the adoption of I4.0 technologies seem to vary according to the existing manufacturing strategy.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the influence that manufacturing strategies may have on the digital transformation of companies, highlighting which strategies are more likely to offer a context to successfully adopt I4.0 technologies. The identification of these relationships helps to define the expectation regarding the company's digital transformation, determining coherent benchmarks and allowing managers to anticipate potential issues.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 16 December 2021

Ting Zheng, Marco Ardolino, Andrea Bacchetti and Marco Perona

This paper has two objectives: first, to investigate the state-of-the-art of Industry 4.0 (I4.0) adoption in Italian manufacturing firms and, second, to understand…

1128

Abstract

Purpose

This paper has two objectives: first, to investigate the state-of-the-art of Industry 4.0 (I4.0) adoption in Italian manufacturing firms and, second, to understand variations in technologies implemented and business functions involved, benefits perceived, and obstacles encountered in I4.0 implementation over a three-year period.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach adopted in this research is descriptive, nesting longitudinal features. The paper presents a descriptive survey of 102 Italian manufacturing companies. The authors also evaluated non-response biases. The longitudinal approach was achieved by comparing the responses of the 40 sub-samples in common with a second similar survey launched three years prior, which aimed to identify patterns of evolution in the adoption of the I4.0 paradigm.

Findings

Survey findings demonstrate that Italian manufacturing companies still have limited awareness of I4.0 technologies, and the adoption of I4.0 technologies differs per technology. Company size and information system coverage level are the two factors that impact the company's technology adoption level. The comparative study shows that knowledge and adoption increase in a three-year interval with an unbalanced involvement of business functions regarding the I4.0 transformation. Indeed, companies are still seeking I4.0 solutions to reduce costs and lead times primarily, and the benefits perceived by companies are shown to be related to the number of I4.0 technologies in use. Finally, when companies put the I4.0 technologies into practice, competence is constantly considered the most significant barrier.

Research limitations/implications

This paper aims at conducting a thorough investigation into the development of I4.0 adoption in manufacturing companies. The main limitation of this study concerns the limited number of subjects involved in the longitudinal study (40) and the focus on a limited geographical area (Italy). In addition, more I4.0 technologies could also be incorporated into the survey protocol to gain further insight into I4.0 development.

Originality/value

The authors provide one of the first attempts to assess the variations of I4.0 implementation concerning technology adoption, business function involvement, and the alteration of benefits and obstacles. Several studies presented in the literature highlight the lack of longitudinal studies investigating the development of the I4.0 paradigm in a specific manufacturing context: this paper is the attempt at filling this gap.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Ray Wild

Changing manufacturing policy and manufacturing technology has had serious implications for production managers. A survey to identify the nature and extent of the impact…

Abstract

Changing manufacturing policy and manufacturing technology has had serious implications for production managers. A survey to identify the nature and extent of the impact of changes in manufacturing technology on the jobs of production or manufacturing managers shows that managers are concerned about the changing nature of their jobs and are increasingly dissatisfied with their roles. Their jobs are diminished but more stressful because they must maintain responsibility over a system over which they have little control. Yet they need a wider range of skills, e.g. people management and a broad knowledge of different subjects, to perform this role. The inevitability of change and the future directions in this area are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 June 2019

Pooja Chaoji and Miia Martinsuo

This paper empirically investigates the processes by which manufacturing firms create radical innovations in their core production process, referred to as radical…

2243

Abstract

Purpose

This paper empirically investigates the processes by which manufacturing firms create radical innovations in their core production process, referred to as radical manufacturing technology innovations (RMTI). The purpose of this paper is to improve the understanding of the processes and practices manufacturing firms use to create RMTI.

Design/methodology/approach

Creation processes for 23 RMTI projects from diverse industry and technology contexts are explored. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews, and an inductive analysis was carried out to identify similarities and differences in RMTI types and creation processes.

Findings

Three types of RMTI and three alternative RMTI creation processes are revealed and characterized. An integrated view is developed of the activities of the equipment supplier and the manufacturing firm, highlighting their different roles and interaction across the three RMTI creation process types.

Research limitations/implications

The exploratory design limits the depth of the analysis per RMTI project, and the focus is on manufacturing technology innovations in one country. The results extend previous case and context-specific findings on RMTI creation processes and provide novel frameworks for cross-case comparisons.

Practical implications

The manufacturing firms’ proactive role in RMTI creation is defined. A framework is proposed for using different RMTI creation processes for different types of RMTI.

Originality/value

This study addresses recent calls for empirical research on understanding the ways in which process innovations unfold in manufacturing firms. The findings emphasize the role of manufacturing firms as creators of RMTI in addition to their role as innovation adopters and implementers and reveal the suitability of different RMTI creation processes for different RMTI types.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 30 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Michael H. Small

Addresses the relationship between firm performance on 15 manufacturing attributes and the extensiveness of advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) portfolios that firms…

2180

Abstract

Addresses the relationship between firm performance on 15 manufacturing attributes and the extensiveness of advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) portfolios that firms adopt. Mail survey data obtained from 116 manufacturing firms in the USA that had adopted a variety of AMT are used in this research. On average, responding firms reported some improvements in manufacturing performance for all variables except changes in average labour cost (total labour cost/number of direct and indirect labour employees). Adoption of AMT tended to result in marginal reductions in the number of operators and marginal increases in average labour costs across all technology portfolio classifications. For all technology groups, firms recorded their highest level of improvement for product quality, and operator output rates/operator productivity. The majority of firms that had adopted both integrated process technologies and integrated information/logistic technologies reported improvements for 14 of the 15 performance attributes covered in this study.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

George K. Stylios

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects…

3063

Abstract

Examines the tenth published year of the ITCRR. Runs the whole gamut of textile innovation, research and testing, some of which investigates hitherto untouched aspects. Subjects discussed include cotton fabric processing, asbestos substitutes, textile adjuncts to cardiovascular surgery, wet textile processes, hand evaluation, nanotechnology, thermoplastic composites, robotic ironing, protective clothing (agricultural and industrial), ecological aspects of fibre properties – to name but a few! There would appear to be no limit to the future potential for textile applications.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2019

Ting Zheng, Marco Ardolino, Andrea Bacchetti, Marco Perona and Massimo Zanardini

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how much the Italian manufacturing companies are ready to be concretely involved in the so-called “Industry 4.0” (I4.0…

1250

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how much the Italian manufacturing companies are ready to be concretely involved in the so-called “Industry 4.0” (I4.0) journey. In particular, this paper focuses on analyzing the knowledge and adoption levels of specific I4.0 enabling technologies, also considering how organizations are involved and which are the main benefits and obstacles.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive survey has been carried out on a total of 103 respondents related to manufacturing companies of different sizes. Data collected were analyzed in order to answer five specific research questions.

Findings

The findings from the survey demonstrate that Italian manufacturing companies are in different positions in their journey toward the I4.0 paradigm, mainly depending on their size and informatization level. Furthermore, not all the business functions are adequately involved in this transformation and their awareness about this new paradigm seems quite low because of the absence of specific managerial roles to guide this revolution. Finally, there are strong differences concerning both benefits and obstacles related to the adoption of I4.0 paradigm, depending on the technology adoption level.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should focus on developing case studies about pilot I4.0 practitioners in order to understand the root cause of successful cases. Both managerial and practical references should be developed, helping Italian manufacturing enterprises to consolidate and strengthen their position in global competitive market. Finally, it would be interesting to carry out the same study in other countries in order to make comparisons and suitable benchmark analyses.

Originality/value

Despite scholars have debated about the adoption of technologies and the benefits related to the I4.0 paradigm, to the best of authors’ knowledge, only a few empirical surveys have been carried out until now on the adoption level of I4.0 principles in the manufacturing sector of a specific country.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1997

Michael H. Small and Mahmoud M. Yasin

Uses information gathered from the advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) literature to develop an integrated conceptual framework for effectively planning and…

1637

Abstract

Uses information gathered from the advanced manufacturing technology (AMT) literature to develop an integrated conceptual framework for effectively planning and implementing these systems. Then examines the efficacy of this framework by investigating the relationship between adoption of various advanced manufacturing technology (AMT), the way that firms plan for and implement them and their eventual performance. A detailed survey instrument was administered to a cross‐section of manufacturing firms in the USA to collect the required data. The results of this investigation indicate that the rate of adoption for integrated technologies was higher among firms that adopted more extensive formal planning approaches. In addition, these firms were found to be outperforming other firms. Also provides managerial and research implications of these and the other findings of this study.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Sami Farooq and Chris O'Brien

The purpose of this paper is to present result obtained from a developed technology selection framework and provide a detailed insight into the risk calculations and their…

1988

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present result obtained from a developed technology selection framework and provide a detailed insight into the risk calculations and their implications in manufacturing technology selection process.

Design/methodology/approach

The results illustrated in the paper are the outcome of an action research study that was conducted in an aerospace company.

Findings

The paper highlights the role of risk calculations in manufacturing technology selection process by elaborating the contribution of risk associated with manufacturing technology alternatives in the shape of opportunities and threats in different decision‐making environments.

Practical implications

The research quantifies the risk associated with different available manufacturing technology alternatives. This quantification of risk crystallises the process of technology selection decision making and supports an industrial manager in achieving objective and comprehensive decisions regarding selection of a manufacturing technology.

Originality/value

The paper explains the process of risk calculation in manufacturing technology selection by dividing the decision‐making environment into manufacturing and supply chain environment. The evaluation of a manufacturing technology considering supply chain opportunities and threats provides a broader perspective to the technology evaluation process. The inclusion of supply chain dimension in technology selection process facilitates an organisation to select a manufacturing technology not only according to its own requirements, but also according to the interest of its constituent supply chain.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2001

Eamon Cahill

Manufactured artefacts will always be needed to satisfy human needs, but the business of manufacturing faces a range of challenges in the emerging knowledge economy. Six…

Abstract

Manufactured artefacts will always be needed to satisfy human needs, but the business of manufacturing faces a range of challenges in the emerging knowledge economy. Six main areas are identified where manufacturing must develop and excel: concurrency, integrating human and technological resources, the conversion of information to knowledge, environmental compatibility, developing reconfigurable enterprises and innovative processes. There are many emerging technologies which can assist, but if Europe is to remain a force in manufacturing it needs to take positive action to enhance its strengths and alleviate its weaknesses – and nowhere more so than in the field of research.

Details

Foresight, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 94000