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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

Nichola Lambert and Lucy Watkins

Clinical placements within healthcare are fundamental to student development and higher education institutions need to ensure that students’ learning within practice is supported…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical placements within healthcare are fundamental to student development and higher education institutions need to ensure that students’ learning within practice is supported. There is an increasing evidence base to suggest that simulation may help to bridge this gap. The purpose of this paper is to describe how a cohort of 85 first‐year mental health students undertook a simulation project, in which they followed the admission of a virtual patient (in the form of an avatar) called Mohammed, to an acute inpatient ward. This simulation project was a two‐week experience for student nurses, whereby they engaged with a virtual service user and worked in teams and as individuals to support his recovery. This project allowed students to practice their clinical skills and communication skills within a safe and supportive environment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is an evaluation of a two‐week experience for student nurses where they were supported to engage with a virtual service user. It was designed to provide students with exposure to decision making, critical thinking and the application of clinical reasoning in a simulated working environment. Students were able to practice their clinical and communication skills within a safe and supportive environment. Student understanding was measured before the project began, on completion to measure any changes and again when the student had had returned to practice to see if they had maintained their skills.

Findings

Several emergent themes were identified: first, students acknowledged a greater level of learning during activities which they considered most challenging and in some cases the least enjoyable. This raises questions about the management of emotions in unfamiliar learning situations and of student expectations around the “Gamification” of learning. Students wanted increased interaction with the avatar and there is potential to continue to develop this project in terms of measuring application of knowledge and student performance by using innovative assessment and engagement strategies.

Practical implications

This project provides a platform for the active contribution of service users, carers and specialist teams. It allows educational input to closely align to practice needs, for lecturers to support and feedback on practice experiences and it opens up flexible and remote working for students. With an understanding of the principles and practice behind it, this project could be adapted for other practice and managerial learning events. Some examples include: multi‐disciplinary team‐building activities, to form part of an assessment or interview process, or integrated within a provider's own polices and opportunities for practice learning, such as preceptorship.

Originality/value

This paper explores opportunities for creative engagement in learning with service users, practice teams and students and it highlights the need for an evidence base around simulation for mental health nurse education.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2021

Janaka B. Lewis

This chapter connects Black women’s histories of educational leadership after emancipation to the need for creative leadership in academia now. This chapter focuses on ways in…

Abstract

This chapter connects Black women’s histories of educational leadership after emancipation to the need for creative leadership in academia now. This chapter focuses on ways in which nineteenth-century educator and activists Lucy Craft Laney and Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, among others, addressed challenges of race and gender and how their stories offer opportunities to consider current needs in higher education. Contrary to the freedom that academia is supposed to promote, topics in gender and ethnic studies may be challenged or restricted as part of liberal political agendas. Additionally, this chapter considers ways in which academia has been used to limit freedom for students and the need for innovative and creative ways to promote academic freedom in educational settings.

Details

Academic Freedom: Autonomy, Challenges and Conformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-883-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 September 2007

Andrea D. Ellinger and Maria Cseh

Interest and research on workplace learning has intensified in recent years, however, research on assessing how employees facilitate each other's learning through everyday work…

4768

Abstract

Purpose

Interest and research on workplace learning has intensified in recent years, however, research on assessing how employees facilitate each other's learning through everyday work experiences and how organizational contextual factors promote or impede the facilitation of others' learning at work is underdeveloped. Therefore, the purpose of this research was to explore how employees facilitate others' learning and the contextual factors that influence employees' facilitation of others' learning in a workplace setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative case study approach was selected for this study. An adaptation of the critical incident technique and semi‐structured in‐depth interviews were conducted with 13 employees representing various functional areas within a learning‐oriented consumer‐focused manufacturer. Content analysis and constant comparative analysis were the approaches used to analyze the data.

Findings

Several findings emerged that describe the catalysts for employees' facilitating others' learning, the behaviors that facilitators engaged to facilitate others' learning, and the perceived outcomes from facilitating learning. Several positive and negative organizational contextual factors emerged that influence the facilitation of others' learning. Specifically, the role of learning‐committed leadership, manifested in several ways, emerged as a powerful organizational contextual factor.

Research limitations/implications

The findings from case study research are not intended to be generalizable. The use of self‐report data is another limitation, as are recollections of critical incidents. However, integrating multiple sources of data collection was an attempt to allow for triangulation of findings.

Practical implications

The findings depict the importance of leadership and management in the process of facilitating learning and the extent to which leaders and managers can create organizational environments conducive to the facilitation of learning that has implications for management and leadership development programs. This study also identifies avenues for future research.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to research that explores how employees facilitate others' learning and the contextual factors that influence employees' facilitation of others' learning in a workplace setting.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 September 2009

Lucy Tinning, Kate Harman, Rachel Lee and June Brown

Promoting mental health and meeting the needs of the large numbers of the general public with problems of anxiety and depression is a big challenge. Particular difficulties are…

Abstract

Promoting mental health and meeting the needs of the large numbers of the general public with problems of anxiety and depression is a big challenge. Particular difficulties are the low capacity of the therapy services and the reluctance of the general public to seek help. The aim of this study was to compare the attendance, effectiveness and characteristics of participants self‐referring to six different psycho‐educational workshops, each using non‐diagnostic titles: self‐confidence; stress; sleep; relationships; happiness; and anger. The series of day‐long workshops ran for one year and were offered to members of the general public in south east London. Over a quarter had not previously sought help from their GP. The take‐up rates for the self‐confidence, sleep and anger workshops were highest and one month after attending these workshops, participants reported significantly lower depression and distress. It was concluded that a self‐referral route to some day‐long workshops can attract quite large numbers of the general public and provide access to effective psychological treatment. These workshops can be used as an effective way of promoting mental health and improving the provision of evidence‐based mental health treatment in the community, possibly within the Improving Access to Psychological Treatments (IAPT) programme in the UK.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Stefan Hendriks, SeoYoon Sung and Rob F. Poell

The purpose of this study was to explore how customer-facing professionals (CFPs) created learning paths to adapt to changing customer needs in a digital environment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to explore how customer-facing professionals (CFPs) created learning paths to adapt to changing customer needs in a digital environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Two groups of CFPs were created from a previous single-case study to examine the learning paths of the two groups. Both groups were digitally competent yet differed in their ability to adapt to the increased usage of digital technologies by their customers: adaptive or conservative CFPs. Research questions addressed perceived learning needs, learning strategies to meet needs and factors that helped or hindered success. Transcripts were coded based on the five elements of a learning path, described within the learning network theory (i.e. motives, learning themes, learning activities, social context and facilities), using the Dedoose coding software. Group findings were compared to identify similarities and differences in their learning path elements.

Findings

CFPs learning path elements varied individually and between adaptive and conservative CFPs. Individually, they varied in learning themes: digital or traditional customer-facing competencies and learning activities such as learning from experience, self-directed learning and learning from others. Drive and ambition emerged as a learning motive for several CFPs in both groups. Although small samples, adaptive CFPs saw a need for digital competencies and engaged in self-directed learning (e.g. solving problems and using digital technologies), more so than conservative CFPs. A positive work environment (e.g. healthy relationships and support from others) was perceived as necessary for success for both groups.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on how one’s approach toward technology influences the creation of one’s learning path. It shows the increased importance of digital competencies for CFPs in a digital world and how CFPs who embrace technology develop technological savviness, solve problems using online resources and experiment with technology and systems, strive for self-sufficiency and rely on self-directed learning.

Book part
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Katharine Dow and Victoria Boydell

This edited collection proposes an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to the study of reproductive technologies (RTs), which reflects the fact that many people use…

Abstract

This edited collection proposes an interdisciplinary and integrated approach to the study of reproductive technologies (RTs), which reflects the fact that many people use different technologies throughout their lifecourse and resists the disciplinary siloing of research on these technologies. The ever-expanding availability of RTs, the continued roll-out of ‘family planning’ and maternity services across low- and middle-income settings and the rapid development of the fertility industry mean that it is more likely than ever that individuals, especially women and trans* people, will engage with more than one RT at some point in their life. These multiple engagements with RTs will affect users' expectations and uptake, as well as the technologies' availability, commercial success, ethical status and social meanings. We offer this book as part of a wider movement in the study of reproduction and RTs, which takes inspiration from the reproductive justice framework to address forms of exclusion, discrimination and stratification that are perpetuated in the development and application of RTs and the ways in which they are studied and theorised. Here, we introduce the project and outline the structure of the book.

Details

Technologies of Reproduction Across the Lifecourse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-733-6

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Canterbury Sound in Popular Music: Scene, Identity and Myth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-490-3

Article
Publication date: 30 December 2021

Belinda Gottschalk and Nick Hopwood

Clinical supervision is a crucial workplace practice for professional learning and development. Research is needed to investigate in detail what happens in supervision to…

Abstract

Purpose

Clinical supervision is a crucial workplace practice for professional learning and development. Research is needed to investigate in detail what happens in supervision to understand how this practice contributes to learning. This paper aims to examine how professionals work with knowledge and navigate epistemic challenges in working with problems of practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Three pairs of psychologists audio-recorded five consecutive supervision sessions and were interviewed twice during that time. Analysis considered supervision as a site of emergent learning, focusing on what was discussed and how problems were worked on, whether as epistemic objects (open-ended, aimed at generating new insights) or by using an approach to knowledge objects that focused more directly on what to do next.

Findings

One pair consistently adopted an epistemic object approach, while another was consistently more action-oriented, focused on knowledge objects. The third pair used both approaches, sometimes expanding the object with a view to gaining insight and understanding, while at other times focusing on next steps and future action.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first to study clinical supervision in terms of how knowledge work is done. Foregrounding the epistemic dimensions of supervision, it reveals previously unexplored but consequential differences in how knowledge is worked with and produced as supervisory pairs discuss complex issues of practice.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 December 2014

Lucy Reading and Erica Bowen

– The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions, beliefs and abilities that support adult male prisoners in overcoming suicidality.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the perceptions, beliefs and abilities that support adult male prisoners in overcoming suicidality.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with eight male life sentenced prisoners in a Category B prison. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data and interpret how prisoners have overcome suicidality.

Findings

Five overarching themes were identified; sense of self, presence of meaning, connectedness, shift of perspective and re-establishing control. The themes were closely interconnected and revealed novel insights into the variables that supported prisoners to overcome suicidality.

Research limitations/implications

The themes were drawn from a specific prisoner population, which may not be representative of the wider prison population. Additionally, the sole focus on suicidality may be an oversimplification of self-destructive behaviours and could have affected the factors identified.

Practical implications

The results highlight the need to refine suicide prevention strategies in prisons; in the assessment of suicide risk, the improvement of supportive regimes and the development of psychological interventions.

Originality/value

This research is the first to qualitatively examine the factors involved in overcoming suicide in adult male prisoners. The research is of value to researchers and practitioners alike, as it extends previous research in prison populations and suggests avenues for the development of suicide prevention strategies.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 21 March 2023

Abstract

Details

Antiracist Library and Information Science: Racial Justice and Community
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-099-3

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