Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Philippa Pearce, Bev Phillips, Margaret Dawson and Sandra G. Leggat

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current evidence regarding the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health professionals.

Downloads
3496

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the current evidence regarding the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors searched CINAHL, Medline, PsychINFO and Cochrane Database. Studies were included if the participants involved were nursing, medical or allied health practitioners, but not students, and if the studies contained discussion regarding the content of clinical supervision. Critical analysis of the articles was carried out by two independent researchers to ensure consistency and thematic analysis was applied.

Findings

Twenty included articles were in three main categories: cross‐sectional studies (n=9), including interview, survey and focus group methods of data collection; literature reviews (n=2); and nine published opinion pieces. Themes related to the content of clinical supervision that were identified were reflective practice; task oriented content; diversity of content; and stress management. The results indicated that current research into the content of clinical supervision for nursing and allied health practitioners is limited and of low quality and that further research is needed to determine what content in clinical supervision is associated with better quality and safety, particularly for health professions other than nursing and psychology.

Originality/value

This is the first review of the current evidence for what constitutes the most appropriate content of clinical supervision for health professionals. Clinical supervision is an important component of quality assurance and clinical governance frameworks and it is essential that health care organizations are assured that effective clinical supervision is in place.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Susan A. Nancarrow, Rachael Wade, Anna Moran, Julia Coyle, Jennifer Young and Dianne Boxall

– The purpose of this paper is to analyse existing clinical supervision frameworks to develop a supervision meta-model.

Downloads
1130

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse existing clinical supervision frameworks to develop a supervision meta-model.

Design/methodology/approach

This research involved a thematic analysis of existing supervision frameworks used to support allied health practitioners working in rural or remote settings in Australia to identify key domains of supervision which could form the basis of supervision framework in this context. A three-tiered sampling approach of the selection of supervision frameworks ensured the direct relevance of the final domains identified to Australian rural allied health practitioners, allied health practitioners generally and to the wider area of health supervision. Thematic analysis was undertaken by Framework analysis methodology using Mindmapping software. The results were organised into a new conceptual model which places the practitioner at the centre of supervision.

Findings

The review included 17 supervision frameworks, encompassing 13 domains of supervision: definitions; purpose and function; supervision models; contexts; content; Modes of engagement; Supervisor attributes; supervisory relationships; supervisor responsibilities; supervisee responsibilities; structures/process for supervision and support; facilitators and barriers; outcomes. The authors developed a reflective, supervision and support framework “Connecting Practice” that is practitioner centred, recognises the tacit and explicit knowledge that staff bring to the relationship, and enables them to identify their own goals and support networks within the context in which they work.

Research limitations/implications

This is a thematic analysis of the literature which was argely based on an analysis of grey literature.

Practical implications

The resulting core domains of supervision provide an evidence-based foundation for the development of clinical supervision models which can be adapted to a range of contexts.

Social implications

An outcome of this paper is a framework called Connecting Practice which organises the domains of supervision in a temporal way, separating those domains that can be modified to improve the supervision framework, from those which are less easily modifiable. This approach is important to help embed the implementation of supervision and support into organisational practice. This paper adds to the existing growing body of work around supervision by helping understand the domains or components that make up the supervisory experience.

Originality/value

Connecting Practice replaces traditional, more hierarchical models of supervision to put the practitioner at the centre of a personalised supervision and support network.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

E Davies, Allison Tennant, Esme Ferguson and Lawrence Jones

The UK government proposals for services for individuals considered to be dangerous with a severe personality disorder (DSPD) are developing. The complex task of balancing…

Abstract

The UK government proposals for services for individuals considered to be dangerous with a severe personality disorder (DSPD) are developing. The complex task of balancing safety and therapeutic change in DSPD services will rest largely upon the skills, knowledge and practice of the staff group. As a result, one challenge for DSPD services is to provide sufficient training and support to staff, in order to ensure that adequate resources are available to assist them in processing their emotional reactions to their work. As part of this, clinical supervision systems need to be developed to offer professional support and learning, enabling individual practitioners to develop knowledge and competence and assume responsibility for their own practice (DoH, 1993). Among the service developments at Rampton Hospital an innovative multi‐professional supervision strategy has been introduced for all staff working in the unit. This paper describes the evolving supervision framework, including a new tool, the ‘Supervision Matrix’, and implementation guidelines, and describes how this supervision framework will be evaluated.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 April 2019

Gemma Forshaw, Rachel Sabin-Farrell and Thomas Schröder

The purpose of this paper is to systematically identify, appraise and synthesise qualitative literature exploring the experience, both positive and negative, of clinical

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to systematically identify, appraise and synthesise qualitative literature exploring the experience, both positive and negative, of clinical supervision from the supervisor’s perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic search of three databases, grey literature, reference lists and citations was conducted. Six articles met the inclusion criteria and their quality was critically appraised by using a modified version of the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool. Data extracted from the articles were synthesised using meta-ethnography.

Findings

Four key themes were identified: experiencing difficulties in clinical supervision, responsibility, similarities to therapy and capabilities as a supervisor. These demonstrated that the role of a supervisor has the potential to be both beneficial and harmful to personal and professional development.

Research limitations/implications

The quality of the studies was variable. Further research is required to explore how supervisors manage difficult experiences to ensure personal development and growth.

Practical implications

Clinical implications include the need for employers to consider the additional pressure associated with providing clinical supervision and to ensure that appropriate support is available. Results complement previous research on the bi-directionality of parallel process in clinical supervision.

Originality/value

This review presents an original synthesis of the supervisor’s experience of delivering clinical supervision to qualified therapists. This is achieved by utilising a systematic methodology and appraising the quality of the studies included. The review highlights how the effects of clinical supervision are not limited to the supervisee, but also experienced by the supervisor. The competing demands and responsibilities associated with clinical supervision impact upon the supervisor’s experience, both positively and negatively. When beneficial, delivering clinical supervision can lead to personal and professional growth in addition to the acquisition of new skills.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

GEOFFREY B. ISHERWOOD

The purpose of this study was to describe effective clinical supervisory behavior as perceived by school principals and to contrast the findings with other current studies…

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to describe effective clinical supervisory behavior as perceived by school principals and to contrast the findings with other current studies of clinical supervision. Three aspects of a principal's supervisory behavior were studied, the verbal behavior used by the principal with the teacher in post‐observation lesson analysis sessions, the basis of authority the principal had over the teachers, and the frequency of clinical supervisory behavior. Sixty‐five principals completed a Q‐sort that described eight different supervisors and rated them from most to least effective. Only the principal's supervisory verbal behavior was perceived as related to the perception of effective clinical supervision.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 September 2013

Clare Whitton, Rachel Collinson and Thomas Adams

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a preliminary evaluation of psychological-based supervision and consultation provided by a clinical psychologist to nursing staff…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a preliminary evaluation of psychological-based supervision and consultation provided by a clinical psychologist to nursing staff working in a low-secure Learning Disability Forensic Service.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire was completed by 22 staff members, to gather information about their experiences of receiving this service and its impact on the motivation, stress and the care they provide for patients within the service.

Findings

The most common reasons for staff to attend were to discuss patient issues (n=10), needing space to reflect (n=10) and wanting to discuss service issues (n=9). Staff found these sessions to be supportive (n=13), useful (n=11), helpful (n=11) and informative (n=11). A majority of staff reported an increase in positive interactions (60 per cent, n=9) and in motivation (60 per cent, n=9) and a reduction in stress (43.7 per cent, n=7). Of staff answering the question 87.5 per cent (n=16) would recommend these sessions to others.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that staff benefitted from having this opportunity to discuss patient and service issues and that this had a positive impact on their role and the care they provide.

Originality/value

Therefore, the paper suggests that by offering psychological supervision and consultation will provide support to nurses working in Learning Disability Forensic Service, increase motivation and reduce stress. These findings could also be used by management in service development, for example to reduce staff sickness and subsequently reduce costs within the service.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Keith Hurst

This article explores professional self‐regulation in the context of clinical governance. It begins by explaining clinical governance’s origins before setting out a…

Downloads
1741

Abstract

This article explores professional self‐regulation in the context of clinical governance. It begins by explaining clinical governance’s origins before setting out a framework in which the Department of Health expects managers and practitioners to work. Description, analysis and synthesis of professional self‐regulation issues, operating within a clinical governance framework, are greatly enhanced by comment drawn from the theoretical and empirical literature.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 January 2021

Eva Davidsson and Martin Stigmar

Previous research has pointed to a lack of studies concerning supervision training courses. Consequently, the literature has little to suggest, and the research field is…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has pointed to a lack of studies concerning supervision training courses. Consequently, the literature has little to suggest, and the research field is underexplored, so questions around the content and design of supervision training courses remain unanswered and need to be addressed systematically. The main aim of the present study is to explore and map whether shared content and design exist in supervisor training courses across different vocations.

Design/methodology/approach

A syllabus analysis is used in order to investigate characteristic features in supervisor training courses related to the professions of dentist, doctor, psychologist, police officer and teacher.

Findings

The results point to the existence of shared content in the different courses, such as an emphasis on learning and supervision theories, feedback, ethics, assessment and communication. Furthermore, the results conclude similarities in design of the courses, such as a problem-based approach, seminars, lectures and homework. Thus, there are common theoretical approaches to important supervisory competences.

Practical implications

Our results intend to offer possibilities to learn from different professions when improving supervisor training courses but may also constitute a starting point for developing a shared model of interprofessional supervisor competences. Furthermore, the results may support possible cooperation in interprofessional courses. This could include arranging interprofessional courses, where one part is shared for participants from the included professions and another part is profession-specific.

Originality/value

We seek to contribute to the research field of supervision at workplaces with knowledge and ideas about how to learn from different professions when developing and improving supervisor training courses.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 April 2018

Anna M. Quinzio-Zafran and Elizabeth A. Wilkins

National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) are highly accomplished teachers who have learned to deprivatize their teaching practice, and hence provide a valuable model for…

Abstract

National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) are highly accomplished teachers who have learned to deprivatize their teaching practice, and hence provide a valuable model for teacher leadership. This chapter, which focuses on NBCTs as mentors of teacher candidates in a professional development school (PDS) setting, blends the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards’ Five Core Propositions, Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium Standards, and National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education PDS Standards to operationalize teacher leadership among four NBCTs. Utilizing multiple case-study research methods, data were gathered using prereflections, weekly e-mail prompts, and end-of-semester interviews. Six common threads focus on NBCTs serving as bridges from preservice to in-service teaching and creating distributed leadership opportunities.

Details

Teacher Leadership in Professional Development Schools
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-404-2

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2007

Elizabeth Hughes, Neil Robertson, Cheryl Kipping and Claire Lynch

Dual diagnosis poses particular challenges for inpatient mental health services. Workers have low levels of training, clinical experience and support to deliver integrated…

Abstract

Dual diagnosis poses particular challenges for inpatient mental health services. Workers have low levels of training, clinical experience and support to deliver integrated care that combines mental health and substance use interventions. In addition, inpatient workers have to balance being therapeutic with ensuring that illicit substance use does not occur on the wards. This often leads to confrontation and poor engagement.In order to improve the capabilities of the workers to deliver more effective interventions for this group of service users, dual diagnosis training should be a high priority for acute inpatient services. However, there are a number of challenges in the implementation of this including lack of resources to fund training and specialist roles, lack of time to attend training (and supervision), and lack of time to implement learning in routine care.This paper will describe the policy drivers for the improvement of dual diagnosis care in acute psychiatric inpatient services, and how two initiatives in London are overcoming some of the obstacles and showing some promising initial outcomes. This paper will make recommendations for future research and developments.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 4000