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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Helen McElroy and David Chappel

Suicide and self‐harm are major public health issues. This study aimed to assess how local and national data could be used more effectively in local suicide and self‐harm…

Abstract

Suicide and self‐harm are major public health issues. This study aimed to assess how local and national data could be used more effectively in local suicide and self‐harm prevention strategies. Twelve semistructured interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of suicide prevention leads in one strategic health authority area and other key local and regional informants. Although suicide prevention work is supported by data, problems were identified with current processes and data and information availability. Local, regional and national health agencies all have a role in ensuring information is used in the best possible way to reduce self‐harm and suicide.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Allyson Kelley, Dee BigFoot, Clayton Small, Tom Mexicancheyenne and Robbie Gondara

Effective community-based suicide prevention strategies require culturally relevant contextually driven approaches, validated by community members. Existing literature…

Abstract

Purpose

Effective community-based suicide prevention strategies require culturally relevant contextually driven approaches, validated by community members. Existing literature, funding agencies, and polices do not adequately address the differences in community vs non-community definitions and approaches to suicide prevention. These differences and the process must be articulated to fully understand the complexities of effective American Indian community-based suicide prevention strategies. This paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a qualitative methodology to understand the process and meaning of an American Indian reservation's community-based approach to suicide prevention.

Findings

Seven recommendations emerge. These include: expand the understanding of suicide; plan activities and outreach early; uphold cultural values; build administrative and community capacity; prepare and respond to community needs and situations; anticipate challenges and develop solutions; and recognize the spiritual aspects of the endeavor.

Originality/value

This study provides new insight about the process in which American Indian communities define, develop and implement suicide prevention strategies that are culturally relevant and community driven. The process and recommendations may be useful for institutions, funding agencies, policy makers, and tribal leaders, and community-based prevention partners.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Philip J. Lazarus and John Kalafat

States that suicidal behaviour among youth has increased significantly over the past several decades and is now the third leading cause of death for 15‐24 year olds…

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1845

Abstract

States that suicidal behaviour among youth has increased significantly over the past several decades and is now the third leading cause of death for 15‐24 year olds. Addresses public policy issues and the current state research aimed at reducing the incidence of suicide in this age group. Suggests that schools and their systems should do a great deal more to prevent youth suicide and that schools are the logical place to implement effective suicide prevention programmes.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Book part
Publication date: 14 December 2018

Alex E. Crosby and Shane P. D. Jack

This chapter depicts the burden of suicidal behavior among African American males. It describes the public health approach to preventing suicidal behavior among African…

Abstract

This chapter depicts the burden of suicidal behavior among African American males. It describes the public health approach to preventing suicidal behavior among African American males. This approach includes assessing and describing the problem; identifying causes or risk and protective factors; developing and evaluating programs and policies; and implementing and disseminating findings and activities. The chapter provides a review of the epidemiology of fatal and non-fatal suicidal behavior; a summary of what is known about the risk and protective factors of the problem; and a descriptive analysis of the circumstances associated with suicides among young African American males is presented. Lastly, the authors give a summary of evidenced-based prevention programs which could be applied in preventing male suicidal behavior.

Details

Inequality, Crime, and Health Among African American Males
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-051-0

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Article
Publication date: 25 April 2011

Pia Solin and Pirjo Nikander

Suicide as a stigmatising issue presents a huge challenge for prevention policy. Also, policy itself is often difficult to turn into action. This research describes the…

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1072

Abstract

Suicide as a stigmatising issue presents a huge challenge for prevention policy. Also, policy itself is often difficult to turn into action. This research describes the interpretative repertoires found in the suicide prevention strategies of England and Finland, and explores their potential functions and audiences. It was found that the political repertoire was formed from four sub‐repertoires: the public health epidemiology, the everyday, the preventive action and the reflective repertoires. This paper discusses the polyphonic and multilayered nature of these policy documents and how different repertoires may be used for various functions. The polyphonic nature of policy documents is necessary to reach a wide readership and to capture suicide as a controversial phenomenon. However, the downside is that the argumentative style may also undermine some of the measures and actions recommended.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2021

Stefanie Oliveira Antunes, Verity Wainwright and Neil Gredecki

This paper aims to provide an overview of current suicide prevention across the UK criminal justice system (CJS). It considers shortcomings in current provision and how…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an overview of current suicide prevention across the UK criminal justice system (CJS). It considers shortcomings in current provision and how improvements could be made by drawing on international practice. Recommendations for practice going forward and suggestions for future research are made based on the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an overview of suicide prevention research to date. Relevant literature was identified through a basic journal article search, including terms such as “probation”, “criminal justice system”, “suicide”, “suicide prevention”, “UK” and “suicide theory”.

Findings

This paper highlights opportunities to improve practice based on the current evidence base, making several recommendations and suggestions for practice, including improving multi-agency cooperation through clearer distribution of responsibilities, simplifying data sharing and investing in trauma-focussed suicide training for staff.

Practical implications

This paper considers how research and psychological theory has informed suicide prevention practice in the UK. Limitations and challenges in applying theory to practice are explored, in the context of research with frontline staff who use such policies. This review proposes potential improvements to suicide prevention implementation to reduce suicide across the wider CJS.

Originality/value

This article represents an overview of the existing literature as well as possible future ideas for policy. It is therefore a piece that represents the viewpoint of all involved authors.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2020

Susanna Doyle

A framework for “negotiating meaning” was applied to a healthcare service to achieve a collaboratively developed suicide prevention clinical pathway.

Abstract

Purpose

A framework for “negotiating meaning” was applied to a healthcare service to achieve a collaboratively developed suicide prevention clinical pathway.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework was originally developed during a previous study that drew on the theory of philosophical hermeneutics to enable a researcher to better understand the experience of older people. This approach was then applied to a healthcare setting and the development of a suicide prevention clinical pathway. Clinical front-line staff engaged effectively and meaningfully with each other, consumers, family members and management to develop a clinical guideline that reflected best practice and improved care provision. An additional outcome involved establishing a supportive culture in which the shared meanings underpinning the experience of working with people expressing suicidality were explored.

Findings

An evidence-based suicide prevention clinical pathway was developed collaboratively with clinicians taking the lead in the process, and leading to the agreement being reached on the final guideline and processes established. The negotiation process brought the perspectives of the different parties together enabling the sharing of underlying meaning inherent in the experience of losing a consumer tragically to suicide. A commitment to taking joint action to reduce the likelihood of further incidents occurring also grew from the shared understanding that developed.

Originality/value

This paper describes the approach that was applied to facilitate engagement processes between clinicians and service management that also challenged the power differentials that usually exist within healthcare and led to positive engagement that supported the safety and quality agenda.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2017

Sarah N. Keller and Timothy Wilkinson

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether a community-based suicide prevention project could increase willingness to seek professional help for suicidal ideation among young people.

Design/methodology/approach

Online surveys were administered at baseline (n = 224) and six months post-test (n = 217), consisting of the Risk Behavior Diagnosis scale; self-report questions on suicidality; willingness to engage with suicide prevention resources; and willingness to communicate with peers, family members, teachers or counselors about suicide.

Findings

A comparison of means within groups from pre- to post-test showed increases in self-efficacy for communicating about suicidal concerns with a teacher, school counselor or social worker; increases in self-efficacy for helping others; and increases in response-efficacy of interpersonal communication about suicide with a teacher, school counselor or social worker.

Practical implications

Young adults need to be willing and able to intervene in life-threatening situations affecting their peers. In step with narrative empowerment education, personal experiences can be used to communicatively reduce peer resistance to behavior change.

Originality/value

Health communicators tend to rely on overly didactic education and awareness-raising when addressing suicide prevention. This research shows the importance of direct and personal forms of influence advocated by social marketing professionals.

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2013

A. Christson Adedoyin and Susan Nicole Salter

The purpose of this paper is to propose that black churches in the USA are best suited to curtail the rising incidence of suicide, and suicide ideation among…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose that black churches in the USA are best suited to curtail the rising incidence of suicide, and suicide ideation among African-American adolescents. Presently, little is known about the best preventive practices and mental healthcare interventions for the black adolescents assailed by suicide and suicidal ideation.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the extant literature was conducted to understand and synthesize the current knowledge base about suicide rates among African-American adolescents. To retrieve and review relevant literature that focussed on suicide among African-American adolescents and the preventive roles of black churches the authors searched the following databases: PsychINFO, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), Social Work abstracts, and Google Scholar.

Findings

Findings indicate that black churches could implement, and profusely replicate the lay health advisors and HAVEN models to successfully mitigate the rate of suicide among black adolescents. In addition it was found that the gatekeeper suicide prevention program model also holds promise for suicide prevention among black adolescents in black churches.

Research limitations/implications

The result of this research synthesize is limited to African-American adolescents and may not be generalizable to other minority adolescents’ experiencing suicidal challenges. Furthermore, future research should utilize qualitative research methodologies to document lived experiences of African-American adolescents who are survivors of suicide attempts with a view to preventing suicide and suicidal ideation among black adolescents.

Originality/value

Healthcare professionals, and policy makers, are provided a panoramic view of culturally competent and spiritually sensitive prevention interventions within black churches that are most appropriate for reducing suicide rates among minority black adolescents.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 6 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Adrian Hayes and Gill Lever‐Green

Suicide prevention is a priority issue in HM Prison Service of England and Wales. Past training in this area has concentrated on the completion of paperwork over direct…

Abstract

Suicide prevention is a priority issue in HM Prison Service of England and Wales. Past training in this area has concentrated on the completion of paperwork over direct interactions with suicidal people. HM Prison Service commissioned STORM, a training scheme focusing on interviewing skills and the identification of risk factors, successfully used in community health settings, piloted it in five prisons and retained it as part of its compulsory training for prison assessors of suicide risk. Although from spring 2007 STORM will no longer be compulsory, its impact has been shown in plans for future development of training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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