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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Trevor Griffiths

The purpose of this paper is to report on eight years of piloting an innovative, practical, lifelong learning intervention that improves emotional intelligence in…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on eight years of piloting an innovative, practical, lifelong learning intervention that improves emotional intelligence in families, schools, communities and workplaces in a unique way: each person gains insights to adjust constructively together to disappointments. “Emotional Logic” identifies a root cause in accumulating complex loss reactions that produces the destructive behaviour, self‐centredness and vengefulness seen in riots and other distress and tension reactions.

Design/methodology/approach

“Emotional Logic” is a teachable language technology, with a set of tools that safely maps emotional chaos. From this mapping, a learning plan is generated that guides self‐help action and improves communication at the right emotional level to promote co‐operation between people and prevent recurrences of distress reactions.

Findings

An outline of the wide range of piloting studies is given. Self‐respect, honesty, empathy and the capacity to make realistic decisions rapidly improve, leading to personal development with unpredictable outcomes.

Practical implications

Training for front‐line staff, managers and redundant health and social care workers could produce leaders for community‐based “Emotional Logic Learning Clubs” within nine months.

Social implications

Many young people cover a sense of shame and anxiety with bravado, or they withdraw into an existential depression. Learning Emotional Logic may improve both communication across generations, and understanding of the common humanity between different groups within our one British culture. The new emotional insights could help young people to resist being inappropriately led, and enable them instead to bring assertive order to situations.

Originality/value

The Emotional Logic tools are unique. Each person can safely map their emotional chaos during times of change, and link these feelings to values they had not named before.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Mark Holloway

The purpose of this paper is to examine the research into prevalence of acquired brain injury in non-ABI specialist services, the impact of the invisible aspects of

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the research into prevalence of acquired brain injury in non-ABI specialist services, the impact of the invisible aspects of executive impairment and loss of insight upon functioning and to question how this is assessed and managed by generalist services.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature search was undertaken to identify where people with an ABI may come in to contact with services that are not specifically designed to meet their needs.

Findings

ABI is prevalent amongst users of a variety of community, inpatient and criminal justice services. The common albeit invisible consequences of ABI complicate assessment, service use and or treatment particularly in the context of a lack of under pinning knowledge and experience amongst the staff in non-specialist ABI services. As a consequence risks to children and adults are increased, opportunities for rehabilitation and growth are lost and human potential squandered. Addressing the first stage in this process, developing knowledge of the consequences of ABI and how to assess need, is a pre-requisite for change.

Practical implications

An absence of basic underlying knowledge of the consequences of ABI impacts upon assessment and so limits the effectiveness of services. A consequence of this is manifest in the over-representation of people with an ABI to be found in non-specialist settings.

Originality/value

–Little research is undertaken from a social and community perspective into the impact of ABI over the longer term for those who have no contact with specialist services and yet, quite clearly by their use of other services, have unidentified, unrecognised and un-responded to needs.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Clive Nancarrow, Jason Vir and Andy Barker

The purpose is to examine the insights gained from applying Ritzer's thesis of McDonaldization to international qualitative marketing research, in particular the four…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to examine the insights gained from applying Ritzer's thesis of McDonaldization to international qualitative marketing research, in particular the four pillars of McDonaldization: efficiency, calculability, predictability, and control.

Design/methodology/approach

The factors influencing choice of qualitative method in practice are examined drawing on the literature, the authors' observations based on experience (a team of practitioners) and a qualitative research study, using a mix of interviews and a workshop with those who co‐ordinate international research or who are subject to the co‐ordination.

Findings

The research suggests McDonaldization or “factory farming” may be a reality in some quarters in the qualitative marketing research industry and examples of how the four pillars of McDonaldization bear on the industry are examined.

Research limitations/implications

There is a need to determine and monitor the extent of the McDonaldization phenomenon and at the same time explore across different cultures two key interfaces that can be adversely affected by McDonaldization, namely the respondent‐researcher interface and the researcher‐researcher interface when the researchers come from different cultures.

Practical implications

Management may now reflect on whether their practices increase or decrease the likelihood of gleaning qualitative insights and the case for considering developing a more eclectic research philosophy.

Originality/value

This paper provides a new framework for evaluating applied qualitative marketing research.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Indranarain Ramlall

Abstract

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Understanding Financial Stability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-834-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Sigrid Pauwels, Johan De Walsche and Dra. Lies Declerck

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the…

Abstract

The authors reflect on the academic bachelor and master programs of architecture. From the perspective of higher education policy in Flanders, Belgium, they examine the intrinsic challenges of the academic educational setting, and the way architectural education can fit in and benefit from it, without losing its specific design oriented qualities. Therefore, they unravel the process of architectural design research, as a discipline-authentic way of knowledge production, leading to the identification of a number of implicit features of an academic architectural learning environment. The disquisition is based on educational arguments pointed out by literature and theory. Furthermore, the authors analyze whether this learning environment can comply with general standards of external quality assurance and accreditation systems. Doing so, they reveal the Achilles’ heel of architectural education: the incompatibility of the design jury with formalized assessment frameworks. Finally, the authors conclude with an advocacy for academic freedom. To assure the quality of academic architectural programs, it is necessary that universities maintain a critical attitude towards standardized policy frameworks.

Details

Open House International, vol. 40 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2020

Georgia Zara, Henriette Bergstrøm and David P. Farrington

This paper aims to explore the sexuality of individuals with psychopathic traits. Sexuality is not only a physiological need but also a way by which people connect to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the sexuality of individuals with psychopathic traits. Sexuality is not only a physiological need but also a way by which people connect to others. According to a Darwinian perspective, psychopathic traits are seen as adaptive responses to environmental conditions, and as a nonpathological and reproductively viable life history strategy, although superficial emotionality and a detached interpersonal style characterise individuals who are high on psychopathic traits.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from the Cambridge Study in Delinquent Development are analysed. This is a prospective longitudinal study of 411 London males, with face-to-face interviews from 8 to 48 years of age.

Findings

Men who are high on psychopathic traits were likely to drift from one relationship to another, without a particular attachment to any of them, and to be sexually promiscuous. They never used contraception, which increased their likelihood of having several children from different partners.

Practical implications

Findings provide an insight into the non-criminal sexual behaviour of males with high psychopathic traits; evidence on a pattern of unsafe/risky sexual relations by males with high psychopathic traits; information on targeting risk factors to prevent the intergenerational transmission of psychopathy.

Originality/value

These findings are significant in highlighting the impact of psychopathic traits upon interpersonal and family dynamics in community samples, as detecting the impact of problematic intimate relationships is difficult in the absence of evident criminality. Rather than completely neglecting their children, men with psychopathic traits spent time with their sons but not with their daughters.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Charlotte Humphrey, Kathryn Ehrich, Bairbre Kelly, Jane Sandall, Sally Redfern, Myfanwy Morgan and David Guest

Explores the implications for continuity of care of the wide range of policy initiatives currently affecting the management and use of human resources in the UK National…

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3666

Abstract

Explores the implications for continuity of care of the wide range of policy initiatives currently affecting the management and use of human resources in the UK National Health Service. Draws on the findings of a short study undertaken in 2001 comprising a policy document analysis and a series of expert seminars discussing the impact of the policies in practice. A variety of potential long‐term gains for continuity of care were identifiable in the current raft of policy initiatives and seminar participants agreed that, when these policies are fully implemented, continuity of care should be enhanced in several ways. However, the impact to date has been rather more equivocal because of the damaging effects of the process of policy implementation on continuity within the system and on staff attitudes and values. If continuity of care is accepted as an important element of quality in health care, more attention must be given to developing strategies which support system continuity.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1996

Clive Nancarrow, Alexander Moskvin and Avi Shankar

Discusses ways in which qualitative techniques might be incorporated in quantitative research and quantitative techniques in qualitative research ‐ a transfer of

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1680

Abstract

Discusses ways in which qualitative techniques might be incorporated in quantitative research and quantitative techniques in qualitative research ‐ a transfer of techniques. Explores the use of neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) and projective techniques in quantitative research. Reports the results of customizing a self‐completion questionnaire to a respondent’s preferred representational system (PRS). This application of NLP produced encouraging findings. Provides suggestions for further research. Describes an example of how NLP and projective techniques can benefit a quantitative study with a case study in which TRBI’s BrandWorks was used. Suggests that, although the adoption by qualitative researchers of techniques used in quantitative research focuses on computer applications, the recent academic interest in the use of text analysers has not been matched by practitioners. Discusses issues related to quality, validity, transparency and value, and reports the findings of a survey of the largest qualitative marketing research suppliers. Finally, examines the use of correspondence analysis and describes ways in which correspondence analysis might benefit the qualitative researcher.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Timothy Oluwafemi Ayodele and Kahilu Kajimo-Shakantu

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges to data sharing among construction stakeholders in the South African construction industry and also assess…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the challenges to data sharing among construction stakeholders in the South African construction industry and also assess stakeholders’ perceptions of the benefits of data sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a cross-sectional survey administered via a Web-based online survey on construction professionals registered with the South African Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions (SACPCMP). The respondents rated on a five-point Likert scale the level of influence of the challenges of, and the benefits derivable from data sharing. These were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistical techniques.

Findings

The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) presented a five-factor structure of the challenges to data sharing, including reporting context/framework/lack of expertise, cost considerations/clients’ influences, data interoperability, stakeholders conservative attitude and personal interest/data confidentiality. These have percentage variances 17.124%, 16.929%, 13.786%, 13.353% and 12.961%, respectively. For the benefits of data sharing, the constructs were categorized into four themes, namely, optimal project decisions/stakeholders’ confidence, benchmarking/ collaboration among firms, time and cost benefits and enhanced market intelligence. These have respective variances of 24.598%, 18.393%, 16.160% and 14.685%.

Practical implications

It is expected that this study will provide information to stakeholders towards implementation policies and practices that could eliminate the challenges to data sharing and assemblage, thereby enhancing the level of data sharing in the construction industry.

Originality/value

Given the increasing global and technological changes, it might be expected that there will be an increased appeal by construction stakeholders towards embracing data sharing and assemblage owing to the inherent benefits and value.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Examines teleworking schemes at Rotherham and Doncaster councils, in South Yorkshire, England. Takes account not only of employees actually undertaking teleworking, but

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576

Abstract

Purpose

Examines teleworking schemes at Rotherham and Doncaster councils, in South Yorkshire, England. Takes account not only of employees actually undertaking teleworking, but also of their office‐bound colleagues.

Design/methodology/approach

Presents some of the conclusions of a two‐year Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)‐funded study into home‐based telework, led by Dr Susanne Tietze, of Bradford University School of Management, with Dr Gill Musson, of the University of Sheffield School of Management, and with Dr Tracy Scurry, of Newcastle upon Tyne University, UK as research fellow.

Findings

Reveals the results of pilot studies conducted to promote understanding of the complexities of this form flexibility and the effects of teleworking on a wide group of organisational stakeholders. Shows that the home‐workers were more productive, had greater feelings of well being, reported improvements in their work‐life balance and a reduction in stress. Colleagues sometimes felt sidelined and ignored, as did at least some of the team leaders who felt left alone in dealing with additional and more complicated co‐ordination tasks and addressing the emotional fall‐out. Points to the importance of running pilot studies to identify potential problems before long‐term implementation.

Practical implications

Serves as a useful reminder to take account of the concerns of employees who are not able to take part in teleworking.

Originality/value

Provides plenty to interest any large organisation considering whether to implement teleworking among at least some of its employees.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 14 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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