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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Lindsay Jones and Phyllis Annesley

An innovative training approach was developed to enable staff working with complex cases, including personality disorder, to reflect on and work with the interpersonal dynamics of…

Abstract

Purpose

An innovative training approach was developed to enable staff working with complex cases, including personality disorder, to reflect on and work with the interpersonal dynamics of their interactions with service users. The aim of this approach is to support effective, compassionate and boundaried care. An overview of the model and development of the training is provided along with presentation and discussion of outcome data. Implications for future practice are also considered.

Design/methodology/approach

One-day workshops were provided within inpatient forensic women’s services. Nine workshops were delivered with 96 multidisciplinary staff having attended in total. Evaluation tools were developed to ascertain participants’ feedback regarding the training including its relevance and potential for impact on practice. Feedback was analysed using a mixture of quantitative and qualitative methods.

Findings

The evaluation demonstrated that the training was well received by a motivated group of participants and was felt to be relevant to their clinical practice.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation is limited by the lack of a follow-up to assess the longer-term impacts of the training and whether the positive effects of the training were maintained.

Practical implications

The findings demonstrate that the training can be delivered within a short time frame, which makes the training efficient and cost effective.

Social implications

The training can develop practitioners’ skills in delivering compassionate and boundaried care in line with key NHS drivers for staff working with complex service users.

Originality/value

The 4Ps model enables staff with little or no psychotherapy training to deliver psychologically informed care which takes account of interpersonal dynamics and positively contributes to relational security, with an emphasis on reflecting on self and others.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2007

Shona Hunter and Elaine Swan

The paper draws out the key conceptual, methodological and substantive issues raised in the papers around the politics of equalities.

1401

Abstract

Purpose

The paper draws out the key conceptual, methodological and substantive issues raised in the papers around the politics of equalities.

Design/methodology/approach

Rather than reviewing and summarising each paper in turn this introductory article synthesises the key themes from papers to develop an overview of the key issues raised in the edited collection.

Findings

The papers trouble traditional dichotomies in equalities studies, suggesting complex and fluid relationships between states, activists and professionals. They also identify some key elements of current equalities work such as equalities framing, diversity interpretation and the negotiation of ambiguity produced through the seesaw of hope/failure characterising this work.

Research limitations/implications

The collection highlights the continuing dearth of work around certain equalities strands, in particular, around sexualities and generation. It also suggests avenues for further work developing postcolonial analysis of equalities work in organisations.

Originality/value

The collection is unique in that it draws together current work crossing diverse national and sectoral contexts and from a range of equalities strands.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 April 2009

Lindsay Jones and Lorraine Sheridan

This study used a cross‐sectional survey design to investigate the incidence, experience and impact of stalking and harassment by clients on mental health professionals working in…

Abstract

This study used a cross‐sectional survey design to investigate the incidence, experience and impact of stalking and harassment by clients on mental health professionals working in a community forensic mental health service. A response rate of 37% (N = 45) was obtained. A majority of respondents (88.9%) reported being harassed in at least one of the specified ways on at least one occasion. Of these respondents, 42.2% met the operational definition for stalking used by the study. The results support suggestions in the literature that mental health professionals may be at heightened risk of being stalked, and that it has both a personal and a professional impact. The aim of this paper is to describe the study, to highlight the implications for organisational practice, including provision of support and training, and to consider implications for future research.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Douglas Sikorski

There is no general theory of public enterprise, and the miscellanyof separate theorizations on the subject has created a conceptualquagmire. Examines the rather confusing state…

Abstract

There is no general theory of public enterprise, and the miscellany of separate theorizations on the subject has created a conceptual quagmire. Examines the rather confusing state of the research on public enterprise performance and behaviour. Contrary to conventional wisdom, it seems that in certain circumstances (as in the case of Singapore) public enterprise can be quite efficient, as well as an effective form of national competition.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1993

Douglas Sikorski

There is no general theory of public enterprise (PE), and themiscellany of separate theorizations on the subject has created aconceptual quagmire. Advances some hypotheses gleaned…

Abstract

There is no general theory of public enterprise (PE), and the miscellany of separate theorizations on the subject has created a conceptual quagmire. Advances some hypotheses gleaned from the literature on the PE concerning confusion in the PE′s objective function, investment tendencies and cost of capital, “fairness” as international competitors, influence of the societal environment, and other major theoretical issues. Hypotheses are modified to accommodate the Singapore experience with PEs. Singapore represents a rare phenomenon – a case of a successful PE system.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 6 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Lottie Alexander

1243

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Pi-Shen Seet, Noel Lindsay and Fredric Kropp

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the entrepreneur's…

3079

Abstract

Purpose

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the entrepreneur's values, entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial self-efficacy – to the firm's entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and market orientation (MO) and, ultimately, to firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a survey on a stratified random sample of founders of early-stage South Australian micro- and small enterprises with a response rate of 24% (N = 204). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the model.

Findings

The study found that there is a significant relationship between the individual lead entrepreneur and firm strategies developed in early-stage firms in explaining firm performance. It also found that internal values are positively related to entrepreneurial attitude. Entrepreneurial attitude is positively related to entrepreneurial self-efficacy and EO innovativeness. In turn, entrepreneurial self-efficacy is related to innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking. The proactiveness dimension of EO and entrepreneurial attitude is related to MO. Entrepreneurial self-efficacy, innovativeness and MO are related to firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to entrepreneurial ventures in South Australia and may lack generalisability in other states and countries.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of the heterogeneity within self-employed individuals, in particular among innovative entrepreneurs, by expanding insights regarding antecedents and consequences of the entrepreneurial process. It develops insights into the links of individual-level constructs with firm-level constructs to develop a more meaningful understanding of new venture creation and performance. It enhances our knowledge of the heterogeneity within the group of self-employed by exploring the individual entrepreneurial antecedents of performance in early-stage firms.

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2018

André de Waal

Happiness at work (HAW) is receiving much attention in the literature, as HAW seems to have a positive effect on organisational performance, such as in increase of productivity…

1773

Abstract

Purpose

Happiness at work (HAW) is receiving much attention in the literature, as HAW seems to have a positive effect on organisational performance, such as in increase of productivity, lower turnover of employees and less customer complaints. There is however no research into the relation between HAW and the attractiveness of an organisation. It stands to reason that people who are happier at work are also happier about their organisation and express this to their family and friends. Having an attractive organisation is becoming increasingly important as the world is currently experiencing an economic boom creating shortages of qualified personnel. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

A possible way of creating an attractive organisation is by transforming the workplace into a high-performing organisation (HPO). The study described in this paper is looking in this respect at three hypotheses: H1. Higher HAW will increase the attractiveness of the organisation; H2. Becoming an HPO will increase HAW; and H3. Becoming an HPO will increase the attractiveness of the organisation. A large-scale survey of Dutch managers and employees was undertaken in which the respondents were asked their opinion of the high-performance level and attractiveness of their organisation, and their happiness with their job and organisation.

Findings

The study results show that the three hypotheses are basically confirmed. Increasing the happiness of work of employees, in general, raises the feeling of how attractive the organisation is to the employees themselves and to the external world. However, this positive feeling is mainly true for the work itself but not so much for how committed employees feel to the organisation.

Practical implications

Organisations now have knowledge at their disposal about ways to promote happiness in their employees, thus raising their attractiveness to current and future employees.

Originality/value

The study results indicate that senior management has to make more effort to raise the quality level of the organisation, preferably towards the high performance level, in order for employees to start feeling more committed to their organisation. This is because the study results show that transforming an organisation into a high-performance entity increases happiness of employees at work significantly, especially about their work and in a lesser degree with the commitment they feel towards the organisation itself. This result has not been found before, so this research provides managers for the first time with a validated way to help their staff to become happier and more productive.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 16 July 2015

Latrica Best and W. Carson Byrd

Our primary aim is to discuss the variability that exists in the operationalization of race/ethnicity in research on genetic and biological markers. We employ Stuart Hall’s…

Abstract

Purpose

Our primary aim is to discuss the variability that exists in the operationalization of race/ethnicity in research on genetic and biological markers. We employ Stuart Hall’s “floating signifiers” of race approach to explain the ambiguous manner in which researchers discuss the links between race and genetics.

Methodology/approach

We examine articles that use race/ethnicity and genetic or biological markers between 2000 and 2013 within three prominent genetic journals. We focused on original, empirical articles only. We utilize various race/ethnic-related search terms to obtain our sample and to categorize how terms were used.

Findings

A total of 336 articles fit our search criteria. The number of articles mentioning race/ethnicity and genetic or biological information increased over the time. A significant percentage of publications base their research on whites only. When discussions of race are included in studies, scientists often use multiple categories of race/ethnicity without much explanation.

Research limitations/implications

We omit non-research articles and commentary for each journal, which could contain important discussions regarding race and genetics. This work highlights how race/ethnicity can vary in application and interpretation.

Originality/value

Our discussion of race/ethnicity as “floating signifiers” adds a layer of complexity to the longstanding debate regarding the importance of race/ethnicity in genetic research. The “floating” nature of race/ethnicity underlines how subjective the characterizations of samples are and how possible interpretations of results for groups can impact health disparities research. Given the increased use of genetic data by social scientists, there is a need for more cross-disciplinary discussions on the race–gene relationship.

Details

Genetics, Health and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-581-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2010

Teresa da Silva Lopes

According to John Dunning’s eclectic paradigm, firms need to have ownership, location, and internalization advantages in order to cross borders and engage in foreign direct…

5472

Abstract

According to John Dunning’s eclectic paradigm, firms need to have ownership, location, and internalization advantages in order to cross borders and engage in foreign direct investment. By drawing on historical evidence on the evolution of a group of leading marketing‐based multinationals in consumer goods, this paper claims that, despite its richness, the eclectic paradigm, and in particular the concept of “ownership advantages,” needs to be revised and extended to take into account different levels of institutional analysis. For the eclectic paradigm to give a rounded view of the internationalizing firm, it needs to acknowledge the critical importance of firm‐specific ownership advantages, such as the role of the entrepreneur.

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