Search results

1 – 10 of 14
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Ahreum Lee and Hokyoung Ryu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile phone camera (MC) (i.e. manual capture). Moreover, the paper investigates the different changes in the interpretative stance of lifelog photos and manually captured photos over time to figure out how the LC application could support the users’ iconological interpretation of their past.

Design/methodology/approach

A 200-day longitudinal study was conducted with two different user groups that took and reviewed photos taken by either a LC or a MC. The study was structured in two phases: a photo collection phase, which lasted for five days (Day 1‒Day 5), and a three-part semi-structured interview phase, which was conducted on Days 8, 50 and 200.

Findings

Results revealed that the interpretative stance of the LC group changed greatly compared to the MC group that kept a relatively consistent interpretative stance over time. A significant difference between the two groups was revealed on Day 200 when the lifelog photos provoked a more iconological and less pre-iconographical interpretative stance. This stance allowed the viewers of lifelog photos to systemically interpret the photos and look back upon their past with different viewpoints that were not recognized before.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to further understand the dynamic change in interpretative stance of lifelog photos compared to manually captured photos through a longitudinal study. The results of this study can support the design guidelines for a LC application that could give opportunities for users to create rich interpretations from lifelog photos.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Jane Emma Machin, Emily Moscato and Charlene Dadzie

This paper examines the potential of photography as a design thinking method to develop innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the potential of photography as a design thinking method to develop innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a critical review of research using photography to examine the complex physical, emotional, psychological and social relationships individuals have with food at personal and societal levels.

Findings

The conceptual legitimacy of photography is well-established in the social sciences but has been missing from design thinking practices. Photography is particularly well suited to understand the highly visual practice of food and to design innovative food experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Practical and ethical issues in the use of photography are considered as a research tool. Future research should examine photography as an integrated tool in the entire design thinking process.

Practical implications

A table of photographic research methods for all stages of design thinking, from empathy to prototyping, is presented. Best practices for the successful implementation and interpretation of photography in food design thinking are discussed.

Social implications

Photography is a uniquely inclusive and accessible research method for understanding the social problem of food well-being and designing innovative food experiences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors knowledge, this paper provides the first conceptual foundation for the use of photography in design thinking. The paper identifies novel photographic methods that can be used to understand problems and generate solutions. It provides guidelines to successfully integrate photography in the design of innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Frank Hopfgartner, Hideo Joho and Cathal Gurrin

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Rashmi Gupta, Martin Crane and Cathal Gurrin

The continuous advancements in wearable sensing technologies enable the easy collection and publishing of visual lifelog data. The widespread adaptation of visual lifelog

Abstract

Purpose

The continuous advancements in wearable sensing technologies enable the easy collection and publishing of visual lifelog data. The widespread adaptation of visual lifelog technologies would have the potential to pose challenges for ensuring the personal privacy of subjects and bystanders in lifelog data. This paper presents preliminary findings from a study of lifeloggers with the aim of better understanding their concerns regarding privacy in lifelog data.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we have collected a visual dataset of 64,837 images from 25 lifelogging participants over a period of two days each, and we conducted an interactive session (face to face conversation) with each participant in order to capture their concerns when sharing the lifelog data across three specified categories (i.e. Private (Only for Me), Semi-Private (Family/Friends) and Public).

Findings

In general, we found that participants tend to err on the side of conservative privacy settings and that there is a noticeable difference in what different participants are willing to share. In summary, we found that the categories of images that the participants wished to be kept private included personally identifiable information and professional information; categories of images that could be shared with family/friends include family moments or content related to daily routine lifestyle, and other visual lifelog data could potentially be made public).

Originality/value

We analysed the potential differences in the willingness of 25 participants to share data. In addition, reasons for being a volunteer to collect lifelog data and how the lifelogging device affected the lifestyle of the lifelogger are analysed. Based on the findings of this study, we propose a set of challenges for the anonymisation of lifelog data that should be solved when supporting lifelog data sharing.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 September 2019

Zablon Pingo and Bhuva Narayan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of wearable health and fitness trackers in everyday life, and users’ motivations and their understanding and use of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the use of wearable health and fitness trackers in everyday life, and users’ motivations and their understanding and use of the data derived from devices, and understand the results using the lens of information behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative, constructionist approach, based on 21 interviews with users of a range of wearable activity trackers used for health and fitness.

Findings

Findings show that the lifelogging devices have become companion tools that enable users to take information from their bodily indicators and make some decisions about their health and fitness, and also track the results when they act on it, thus giving them a sense of gratification and a sense of control over their own health.

Practical implications

The findings have implications on how health professionals can talk to their lifelogging patients about how to deal with and understand the information provided by their activity-tracking devices. Some participants in the study already discuss these data regularly with their health professionals.

Originality/value

As the self-tracking practices attract wide range research interests from human–computer interaction, information systems, digital sociology, health informatics and marketing among others. This study provides important everyday information-seeking perspective that contributes to the understanding of the practices of how people make sense of the data, how the data improves their wellbeing, i.e. physical health improvement or fitness, and implications to users health behaviour. Additionally the study adds to the lifelogging literature through a constructionist, qualitative approach rather than a technological deterministic approach.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Liesbet Van Zoonen and Georgina Turner

The purpose of this paper is to address the paradox in identity management that sees people happily sharing personal information in some circumstances, such as via social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to address the paradox in identity management that sees people happily sharing personal information in some circumstances, such as via social networks, yet defending their right to privacy in others, such as in interactions with the state. The authors examine the predominant explanations and elaborate how these ignore the different types of individual acts and agency involved in identity management. The authors conclude with a proposal to consider alternative, narrative approaches to identity management (IM).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper has been developed out of the empirical research examining public responses to new forms of IM, based on, among other things, Delphi interviews with experts, films and television series and survey and focus group data about people's feelings and attitudes. The authors have combined these data into an approach that theorises rather than reports about public engagements with IM.

Findings

Finding any explanation for the paradox that rests on the distinction between state and commercial contexts to be less and less satisfactory, the paper reframes the problem as one of varying degrees of agency, from submission to transaction and expression. The latter, the authors argue, has been written out of modern IM, which is at odds with the centrality of narrative to the human sense of self.

Originality/value

The field of IM has yet to consider “identity” in terms beyond distinct attributes and bits of information. In this paper the authors set out to demonstrate the value of a notion of IM that is sensitive to degrees of agency and the authors ask how the fundamental human desire to narrate the self might become a part of IM systems.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Isha Ghosh and Vivek Singh

Mobile phones have become one of the most favored devices to maintain social connections as well as logging digital information about personal lives. The privacy of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Mobile phones have become one of the most favored devices to maintain social connections as well as logging digital information about personal lives. The privacy of the metadata being generated in this process has been a topic of intense debate over the last few years, but most of the debate has been focused on stonewalling such data. At the same time, such metadata is already being used to automatically infer a user’s preferences for commercial products, media, or political agencies. The purpose of this paper is to understand the predictive power of phone usage features on individual privacy attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study uses a mixed-method approach, involving analysis of mobile phone metadata, self-reported survey on privacy attitudes and semi-structured interviews. This paper analyzes the interconnections between user’s social and behavioral data as obtained via their phone with their self-reported privacy attitudes and interprets them based on the semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The findings from the study suggest that an analysis of mobile phone metadata reveals vital clues to a person’s privacy attitudes. This study finds that multiple phone signals have significant predictive power on an individual’s privacy attitudes. The results motivate a newer direction of automatically inferring a user’s privacy attitudes by leveraging their phone usage information.

Practical implications

An ability to automatically infer a user’s privacy attitudes could allow users to utilize their own phone metadata to get automatic recommendations for privacy settings appropriate for them. This study offers information scientists, government agencies and mobile app developers, an understanding of user privacy needs, helping them create apps that take these traits into account.

Originality/value

The primary value of this paper lies in providing a better understanding of the predictive power of phone usage features on individual privacy attitudes.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Ciaran B. Trace and Yan Zhang

The purpose of this article is to examine the ways in which self-tracking data have meaning and value in and after the life of the creator, including how such data could…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine the ways in which self-tracking data have meaning and value in and after the life of the creator, including how such data could become part of the larger historical record, curated in an institutional archive. In doing so, the article expands upon existing shared interests among researchers working in the areas of self-tracking, human–computer interaction and archival science.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 18 people who had self-tracked for six months or more were recruited for the study. Participants completed a survey which gathered demographic data and characteristics vis-à-vis their self-tracking behavior. In-person semi-structured interviews were then conducted to ascertain the beliefs of the participants regarding the long-term use and value of personal quantified-self data.

Findings

The findings reveal the value that people place on self-tracking data, their thoughts on proper modes for accessing their archive once it moves from the private to the public space, and how to provide fidelity within the system such that their experiences are represented while also enabling meaning making on the part of subsequent users of the archive.

Originality/value

Today’s quantified-self data are generally embedded in systems that create a pipeline from the individual source to that of the corporate warehouse, bent on absorbing and extracting insight from a totality of big data. This article posits that new opportunities for knowing and for design can be revealed when a public interest rationale is appended to rich personalized collections of small data.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 76 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 April 2019

Katleen Gabriels and Mark Coeckelbergh

This paper aims to fill this gap (infra, originality) by providing a conceptual framework for discussing “technologies of the self and other,” by showing that, in most…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to fill this gap (infra, originality) by providing a conceptual framework for discussing “technologies of the self and other,” by showing that, in most cases, self-tracking also involves other-tracking.

Design/methodology/approach

In so doing, we draw upon Foucault’s “technologies of the self” and present-day literature on self-tracking technologies. We elaborate on two cases and practical domains to illustrate and discuss this mutual process: first, the quantified workplace; and second, quantification by wearables in a non-clinical and self-initiated context.

Findings

The main conclusion is that these shapings are never (morally) neutral and have ethical implications, such as regarding “quantified otherness,” a notion we propose to point at the risk that the other could become an object of examination and competition.

Originality/value

Although there is ample literature on the quantified self, considerably less attention is given to how the relation with the other is being shaped by self-tracking technologies that allow data sharing (e.g. wearables or apps such as Strava or RunKeeper).

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Andrew Iliadis and Isabel Pedersen

This paper aims to examine how metadata taxonomies in embodied computing databases indicate context (e.g. a marketing context or an ethical context) and describe ways to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how metadata taxonomies in embodied computing databases indicate context (e.g. a marketing context or an ethical context) and describe ways to track the evolution of the embodied computing industry over time through digital media archiving.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors compare the metadata taxonomies of two embodied computing databases by providing a narrative of their top-level categories. After identifying these categories, they describe how they structure the databases around specific themes.

Findings

The growing wearables market often hides complex sociotechnical tradeoffs. Marketing products like Vandrico Inc.’s Wearables Database frame wearables as business solutions without conveying information about the various concessions users make (about giving up their data, for example). Potential solutions to this problem include enhancing embodied computing literacy through the construction of databases that track media about embodied computing technologies using customized metadata categories. Databases such as FABRIC contain multimedia related to the emerging embodied computing market – including patents, interviews, promotional videos and news articles – and can be archived through user-curated collections and tagged according to specific themes (privacy, policing, labor, etc.). One of the benefits of this approach is that users can use the rich metadata fields to search for terms and create curated collections that focus on tradeoffs related to embodied computing technologies.

Originality/value

This paper describes the importance of metadata for framing the orientation of embodied computing databases and describes one of the first attempts to comprehensively track the evolution of embodied computing technologies, their developers and their diverse applications in various social contexts through media archiving.

Details

Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-996X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 14