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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2019

Ahreum Lee and Hokyoung Ryu

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how people differently create meaning from photos taken by either a lifelogging camera (LC) (i.e. automatic capture) or a mobile phone camera (MC) (i.e. manual capture). Moreover, the paper investigates the different changes in the interpretative stance of lifelog photos and manually captured photos over time to figure out how the LC application could support the users’ iconological interpretation of their past.

Design/methodology/approach

A 200-day longitudinal study was conducted with two different user groups that took and reviewed photos taken by either a LC or a MC. The study was structured in two phases: a photo collection phase, which lasted for five days (Day 1‒Day 5), and a three-part semi-structured interview phase, which was conducted on Days 8, 50 and 200.

Findings

Results revealed that the interpretative stance of the LC group changed greatly compared to the MC group that kept a relatively consistent interpretative stance over time. A significant difference between the two groups was revealed on Day 200 when the lifelog photos provoked a more iconological and less pre-iconographical interpretative stance. This stance allowed the viewers of lifelog photos to systemically interpret the photos and look back upon their past with different viewpoints that were not recognized before.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to further understand the dynamic change in interpretative stance of lifelog photos compared to manually captured photos through a longitudinal study. The results of this study can support the design guidelines for a LC application that could give opportunities for users to create rich interpretations from lifelog photos.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Frank Hopfgartner, Hideo Joho and Cathal Gurrin

Abstract

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2021

Jane Emma Machin, Emily Moscato and Charlene Dadzie

This paper examines the potential of photography as a design thinking method to develop innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the potential of photography as a design thinking method to develop innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a critical review of research using photography to examine the complex physical, emotional, psychological and social relationships individuals have with food at personal and societal levels.

Findings

The conceptual legitimacy of photography is well-established in the social sciences but has been missing from design thinking practices. Photography is particularly well suited to understand the highly visual practice of food and to design innovative food experiences.

Research limitations/implications

Practical and ethical issues in the use of photography are considered as a research tool. Future research should examine photography as an integrated tool in the entire design thinking process.

Practical implications

A table of photographic research methods for all stages of design thinking, from empathy to prototyping, is presented. Best practices for the successful implementation and interpretation of photography in food design thinking are discussed.

Social implications

Photography is a uniquely inclusive and accessible research method for understanding the social problem of food well-being and designing innovative food experiences.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors knowledge, this paper provides the first conceptual foundation for the use of photography in design thinking. The paper identifies novel photographic methods that can be used to understand problems and generate solutions. It provides guidelines to successfully integrate photography in the design of innovative food experiences that improve food well-being.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Hanyoung Go, Myunghwa Kang and Yunwoo Nam

This paper aims to track how ecotourism has been presented in a digital world over time using geotagged photographs and internet search data. Ecotourism photographs and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to track how ecotourism has been presented in a digital world over time using geotagged photographs and internet search data. Ecotourism photographs and Google Trends search data are used to evaluate tourist perceptions of ecotourism by developing a categorization of essential attributes, examining the relation of ecotourism and sustainable development, and measuring the popularity of the ecotourism sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers collected geotagged photographs from Flickr.com and downloaded Google search data from Google Trends. An integrative approach of content, trend and spatial analysis was applied to develop ecotourism categories and investigate tourist perceptions of ecotourism. First, the authors investigate ecotourism geotagged photographs on a social media to comprehend tourist perceptions of ecotourism by developing a categorization of key ecotourism attributes and measuring the popularity of the ecotourism sites. Second, they examined how ecotourism has been related with sustainable development using internet search data and investigate the trends in search data. Third, spatial analysis using GIS maps was used to visualize the spatial-temporal changes of photographs and tourist views throughout the world.

Findings

This study identified three primary themes of ecotourism perceptions and 13 categories of ecotourism attributes. Interest over time about ecotourism was mostly presented as its definitions in Google Trends. The result indicates that tracked ecotourism locations and tourist footprints are not congruent with the popular regions of ecotourism Google search.

Originality/value

This research follows the changing trends in ecotourism over a decade using geotagged photographs and internet search data. The evaluation of the global ecotourism trend provides important insights for global sustainable tourism development and actual tourist perception. Analyzing the trend of ecotourism is a strategic approach to assess the achievement of UN sustainable development goals. Factual perspectives and insights into how tourists are likely to seek and perceive natural attractions are valuable for a range of audiences, such as tourism industries and governments.

摘要

研究目的本论文旨在探索生态旅游业在电子世界中是如何随着时间而显示出来的,文章样本为带有地理标记的图片和互联网搜索数据。本文使用生态旅游图片和谷歌趋势搜索数据来评估游客对生态旅游的感知,通过对关键要素的分类,审视生态旅游和可持续发展的关系,以及衡量生态旅游基地的受欢迎程度等方法。

研究设计/方法/途径

本论文作者从Flickr.com上搜集地理标记图片以及从谷歌趋势上下载谷歌搜索数据。样本分析通过内容、趋势、空间上的综合分析,来开发生态旅游类别和游客对生态旅游的感知。首先,我们研究了社交媒体上的生态旅游地理标记图片以理解游客对生态旅游的感知情况,以此搭建了关键生态旅游要素的类别体系,和衡量生态旅游基地的受欢迎程度。第二,我们通过使用互联网搜索数据,检测了生态旅游如何与可持续发展相连接,以及研究了搜索数据中的趋势。第三,我们使用了GIS软件来操作空间分析,对图片的空间-时间改变和游客对世界的观点做了可视化处理。

研究结果

本论文确立了三项生态旅游感知的基本主题以及13项生态旅游要素类别。生态旅游互联网随着时间演化,根据谷歌趋势上的定义,被大致地展现出来。本论文研究结果表示生态旅游地理位置和游客足迹与生态旅游谷歌搜索的热门区域不全是完全吻合的。

研究原创性/价值

本论文使用地理标记图片和互联网搜索数据将生态旅游发展趋势近十年的变化描画出来。全球生态旅游趋势的评估对全球可持续旅游发展和实际游客感知方面做出重要见解启示。生态旅游趋势的分析作为一种战略方法,对UN可持续发展目标的时间起到评估作用。本论文针对游客的真实感知和意见,游客如何选择和感知自然景观,这对于很多群体,比如旅游行业和政府,都有着重要意义。

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Carmen Coronado, Carla Freijomil-Vázquez, Sara Fernández-Basanta, Elena Andina-Díaz and María-Jesús Movilla-Fernández

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher education institutions have a significant impact in preparing future generations for the creation of a sustainable society. By formulating appropriate curricula, the university can shape student personality with sustainability concerns. This study aims to present the results of a teaching approach on environmental sustainability using the photovoice methodology. A guided visit to the sewage treatment plant of A Coruña was included as a teaching activity in the “Microbiology and Parasitology” classes of the podiatry degree at University of A Coruña. The teaching objectives were to reinforce contents through observation and to introduce citizen awareness on sustainability and responsible water use in a cross-sectional manner.

Design/methodology/approach

In this case study, different steps of photovoice as a qualitative participatory action methodology were developed. A total of 43 university students willingly participated with their photographs. Qualitative data were collected from the students’ photovoice visit reports and a subsequent discussion group. Thematic content analysis was performed manually.

Findings

This study explored the impact of an environmental sustainability teaching activity on the university student community. Six main categories emerged from the qualitative analysis: savings/waste of water, misuse of the water closet, disposing of used oil, solid waste/trash, reuse of clean water and reuse/reduction of the use of plastics. The cross-sectional findings on the needs of education and awareness of sustainability in the community and companies are presented.

Originality/value

The findings provide evidence of the ability of photovoice method as a pedagogical tool to promote reflection and change in the university community and to introduce sustainability cross-sectional content in green campus curricula. This photovoice experiment is simple and feasible to implement and has a very low economic cost, as long as there are qualified educators.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

David O'Connell

The purpose of this paper to understand why some members of Congress have more Instagram followers, and why some Congressional Instagram posts receive more likes and comments.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper to understand why some members of Congress have more Instagram followers, and why some Congressional Instagram posts receive more likes and comments.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a content analysis of every Instagram post shared by all members of Congress who were seated for the first six months of the 115th Congress (17,811 posts in all). Information was collected at both the account level, as well as at the level of the individual post. Variables were then created to predict a member's followers and a post's likes and comments using a series of regression models.

Findings

This paper finds that factors capturing real world influence best explain why some members have more followers on Instagram. Senators, members who have served longer in office, past or future presidential candidates, Congressional leaders and ideological extremists all had significantly more followers. This paper also shows that personal content such as family photos, personal photos, selfies and pet photos produces significantly more user responses, while impersonal content like text based posts produces fewer.

Practical implications

This paper offers a general understanding of how anyone might maximize their user engagement on Instagram.

Originality/value

Little published research has studied how politicians use Instagram. This paper expands previous work examining influence on Twitter and Facebook. Further, these findings shed light on broader issues, including how social media reinforces existing power biases, and on the increasing trend towards personalization in American politics.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2019

Hadi Mahami, Farnad Nasirzadeh, Ali Hosseininaveh Ahmadabadian, Farid Esmaeili and Saeid Nahavandi

This paper aims to propose an automatic imaging network design to improve the efficiency and accuracy of automated construction progress monitoring. The proposed method…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to propose an automatic imaging network design to improve the efficiency and accuracy of automated construction progress monitoring. The proposed method will address two shortcomings of the previous studies, including the large number of captured images required and the incompleteness and inaccuracy of generated as-built models.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the proposed method, the number of required images is minimized in two stages. In the first stage, the manual photogrammetric network design is used to decrease the number of camera stations considering proper constraints. Then the image acquisition is done and the captured images are used to generate 3D points cloud model. In the second stage, a new software for automatic imaging network design is developed and used to cluster and select the optimal images automatically, using the existing dense points cloud model generated before, and the final optimum camera stations are determined. Therefore, the automated progress monitoring can be done by imaging at the selected camera stations to produce periodic progress reports.

Findings

The achieved results show that using the proposed manual and automatic imaging network design methods, the number of required images is decreased by 65 and 75 per cent, respectively. Moreover, the accuracy and completeness of points cloud reconstruction is improved and the quantity of performed work is determined with the accuracy, which is close to 100 per cent.

Practical implications

It is believed that the proposed method may present a novel and robust tool for automated progress monitoring using unmanned aerial vehicles and based on photogrammetry and computer vision techniques. Using the proposed method, the number of required images is minimized, and the accuracy and completeness of points cloud reconstruction is improved.

Originality/value

To generate the points cloud reconstruction based on close-range photogrammetry principles, more than hundreds of images must be captured and processed, which is time-consuming and labor-intensive. There has been no previous study to reduce the large number of required captured images. Moreover, lack of images in some areas leads to an incomplete or inaccurate model. This research resolves the mentioned shortcomings.

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2019

Ahmad Shahrunnizam Ahmad Shazali and Khairul Nizam Tahar

The current technique used to measure construction is the conventional total station method. However, the conventional method is time-consuming and could not be used to…

Abstract

Purpose

The current technique used to measure construction is the conventional total station method. However, the conventional method is time-consuming and could not be used to create a photo-realistic three-dimensional (3D) model of an object. Furthermore, the Canseleri building is located at a slope. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim of this study is to assess the geometric accuracy of a 3D model using unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) images. There are two objectives in this study. The first is to construct a 3D model of the Canseleri building using UAV images. The second objective is to validate the 3D model of the Canseleri building based on actual measurements.

Findings

The close-range photogrammetry method, using the UAV platform, was able to produce a 3D building model. The results show that the errors between the actual measurement and the generated 3D model were less than 4 cm. The accuracy of the 3D model achieved in this study was about 0.015 m, compared to total station measurements.

Originality/value

Accuracy assessment was done by comparing the estimated measurement of the 3D model with the direct measurement. The differences between the measured values with actual values could be compared. Based on this study, the 3D building model gave a reliable accuracy for specific applications.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2012

Dion Hoe‐Lian Goh, Chei Sian Lee and Guanghao Low

Applications blending games with mobile content sharing have garnered much interest recently. In this paper, the authors aim to examine users' motivations for seeking and…

Abstract

Purpose

Applications blending games with mobile content sharing have garnered much interest recently. In this paper, the authors aim to examine users' motivations for seeking and creating content in the context of Indagator, a mobile content sharing game. The authors also seek to investigate the impact of games on these motivations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a user study where 28 participants used Indagator for a week to create and share content (annotations). Participants were interviewed. All interview responses, and annotations sought (5,799) and generated (599) were manually examined and coded to ascertain motivations.

Findings

Motivations for seeking content include awareness, task performance, exploratory play, killing time, and socialising. Those for creating include altruism, task performance, competitive play, killing time, reminder of experiences, self‐presentation, and socialising. Additionally, games served as a motivator for mobile content sharing systems, forming a mutually beneficial ecology with content sharing.

Originality/value

Prior work has not examined motivations for using mobile content sharing games, and has typically employed surveys rather than actual use of such applications. Understanding motivations has implications for developers. The benefits of incorporating games include increasing awareness for the application and addressing the “cold‐start” problem inherent in many newly introduced applications.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 18 January 2016

Mengqi Yuan and David Bourell

The purpose of this paper is to improve the quality of additive manufactured optically translucent parts by investigating the manufacturing issues, analyzing lithophane…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to improve the quality of additive manufactured optically translucent parts by investigating the manufacturing issues, analyzing lithophane production criteria and identifying the best translucent material and additive manufacturing (AM) technology.

Design/methodology/approach

Figured lithophanes were laser sintered on a 3D Systems SinterStation® HiQ™ with varying layer thickness and plate thickness. Laser sintered (LS) polyamide (PA) 12 blanks were cyanoacrylate infiltrated and polished. Optical properties and performance were compared with the original LS blanks. Lithophanes and blanks were manufactured using 3D systems stereo lithography apparatus (SLA)® Viper ™si2 station, and optical properties and lithophane performance were compared with the LS specimens.

Findings

When building in the XY plane, it is optimal to sinter with the minimum layer thickness (0.076 mm) and maximum plate thickness (5 mm). Cyanoacrylate infiltration and polishing assists in reducing the LS PA 12 plate surface roughness, but polishing does not affect the lithophane performance. The best LS candidate should have an absorption coefficient of 0.5/mm using a white light source. Improved resolution but reduced contrast was observed on stereolithography (SL) specimens compared to LS parts.

Research limitations/implications

Transmittance experiments were performed on three SL parts which was not sufficient for optical property calculation. Limited literature was found for new material exploration.

Originality/value

It is the first effort to study systematically quality improvement issues of LS PA optically translucent parts. A comparison is made of optical performance between parts made using LS and SL.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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