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Article

Shraddha Anilkumar and Shalini Ramdas Lihitkar

The purpose of this paper is to know the personalized online student support system provided by e-learning centers, to find out academic advice as Student Support Services…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to know the personalized online student support system provided by e-learning centers, to find out academic advice as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out career counseling as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out technical support as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out registration assistance as Student Support Services provided by institution running e-learning programs; to find out methods used for paying fee for e-learning programs for LIS education; and to find out financial aid available for students for e-learning programs in LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study is exploratory in nature. In the study, the attempt was made to explore the Student Support Services provided by e-learning institution. It focuses on the various online Student Support Services. Data collection was made through following methods: through Web pages of related departments; by contacting the departments and by sending questionnaires.

Findings

Student Support Services provided by institutions – academic advice: it was observed from Table I that the data were significant (p < 0.05) and that high percentage (60.9 per cent) of universities/institutes provide support systems like academic advice to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; career counseling: it was observed from Table II that the data were significant (p < 0.05) and that high percentage (60.9 per cent) of universities/institutes provide support systems like career counseling to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; technical support: it was observed from Table III that 100 per cent universities/institutes provide technical support to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs; and registration assistance: it was observed from Table IV that 100 per cent universities/institutes provide registration assistance support to the students opting LIS courses through e-programs. *Mode of payment of fees for e-learning programs for LIS education: it was apparent from the information (Table V) that mode of payment of fees such as credit card, check and purchase order or money order is available for majority of e-learning courses. *Financial aid available for students for e-learning programs in LIS education: it may be concluded on the basis of the study results (Table VI) that for significantly (p < 0.05) high percentage of LIS courses, the financial aid is not available.

Research limitations/implications

The research work, especially Student Support Services, was limited to only 23 institutions which are running courses in LIS education by e-learning technology.

Practical implications

The present study shows that there is a need to strengthen more Student Support Services. The successful implementation of such a system would need efforts by the concerned management of the institutions and substantial support from the apex statutory organizations. The stakeholders have strongly reinforced the necessity of support strategies which need to start from the time the student enrolls to completion of course. Feedback from students, teachers and researchers should be taken for improving the services. It is useful for those who are running e-learning courses.

Social implications

Students who are taken and studying online courses would be aware of Student Support Services.

Originality/value

This research work is valuable and original, and no prior research has been identified for Student Support Services for e-learning programs in LIS.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

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Article

Elisha Ondieki Makori, Cephas Odini and Joseph Bernard Ojiambo

The paper aims to establish the use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in education and training of undergraduate library and information science (LIS

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to establish the use of information and communications technologies (ICTs) in education and training of undergraduate library and information science (LIS) students in two selected Kenyan universities and suggest recommendations to improve ICT education and training in the country.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilised a qualitative method. A survey research design was used to collect data from various categories of respondents in LIS including lecturers, undergraduate students, information professionals and employers. Interviews and document analysis were also used to collect data from the respondents.

Findings

Findings show that the graduates lack preferred ICTs knowledge, competencies and skills important in the modern information environment such as web technologies, information programming skills, software development, distributed systems, virtual libraries and digital information systems. Information sciences education in Kenyan universities and other institutions of higher learning need to review the curriculum and provide ICT education and training that address the needs and demands of the current job market and performance requirements.

Research limitations/implications

The study was effectively carried out at Kenyatta and Moi Universities being the leading universities offering LIS programmes in Kenya.

Practical implications

In the twenty-first century and beyond, students can no longer be confined to traditional practices of LIS education. Information sciences programmes from around the global have recognized the importance to fully integrate ICTs education and training in order to meet the needs and demands of students and employers.

Originality/value

Present employment and career opportunities favour information professionals with intensive technological competencies and skills.

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Book part

Lisa K. Hussey

Although there is great potential for diversity, library and information science (LIS) is a relatively homogenous profession. Increasing the presence of librarians of…

Abstract

Although there is great potential for diversity, library and information science (LIS) is a relatively homogenous profession. Increasing the presence of librarians of color may help to improve diversity within LIS. However, recruiting ethnic minorities into LIS has proven to be difficult despite various initiative including scholarships, fellowships, and locally focused programs. The central questions explored in this research can be divided into two parts: (1) Why do ethnic minorities choose librarianship as a profession? (2) What would motivate members of minority groups to join a profession in which they cannot see themselves?

The research was conducted through semi-structured, qualitative interviews of 32 ethnic minority students from one of four ethnic minority groups (African American, Asian American, Hispanic/Latino, and Native American) currently enrolled in an LIS graduate program. Eleven themes emerged from the data: libraries, librarians, library work experience, LIS graduate program, career plans and goals, education and family, support, mentors, ethnicity and community, acculturation, and views of diversity.

The findings seem to support many assumptions regarding expectations and career goals. The findings related to libraries, librarians, mentors, and support illustrate that many recruitment initiatives are starting in the right place. However, the most noteworthy findings were those that centered on identity, acculturation, and diversity because they dealt with issues that are not often considered or discussed by many in the profession outside of ethnic minority organizations.

Details

Advances in Library Administration and Organization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-580-2

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Book part

Fiona Jardine

Cultural competency is essential for all library and information science (LIS) professionals, including students and instructors within LIS educational programs. This…

Abstract

Purpose

Cultural competency is essential for all library and information science (LIS) professionals, including students and instructors within LIS educational programs. This chapter demonstrates that students and student groups that focus on diversity and inclusion issues can play an important role in advancing their own—and their instructors’—cultural knowledge, attitude, and skills.

Methodology/approach

A review of existing literature together with examination of a case study from the author’s own experience.

Findings

Diversity and inclusion is rarely adequately integrated into LIS education. Through service learning, students have provided rich and varied opportunities for learning through events, projects, and presentations. LIS professionals within information organizations of all kinds can benefit from starting their own groups dedicated to diversity and inclusion.

Originality/value

Little literature exists on the role of students in increasing cultural competency with the LIS professions.

Details

Perspectives on Libraries as Institutions of Human Rights and Social Justice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-057-2

Keywords

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Article

Ana V. Ndumu and Tina Rollins

After the closing of four of the five historically Black college and university (HBCU)–based library and information science (LIS) graduate programs (leaving only that of…

Abstract

Purpose

After the closing of four of the five historically Black college and university (HBCU)–based library and information science (LIS) graduate programs (leaving only that of North Carolina Central University), there is a need to revitalize HBCU-LIS degree program pathways to increase racial diversity in LIS education.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed-methods study entails survey and interview research with HBCU librarians. The researchers explored participants’ professional experiences and perspectives on creating partnerships between HBCU institutions and LIS graduate programs.

Findings

Participants demonstrated substantial experience, expressed high levels of job satisfaction, viewed pipeline programs favorably and believed that LIS can be strengthened through the inclusion of HBCU educational practices and students.

Practical implications

This study provides recommendations and a model for forging culturally competent and reciprocal HBCU–LIS degree program partnerships.

Social implications

Community-led knowledge of HBCUs can disrupt rescue and deficiency narratives of these institutions. Such prejudices are detrimental to HBCU-LIS degree program partnerships.

Originality/value

Past HBCU-LIS degree program pipeline partnerships did not culminate in research or published best practices. This paper presents literature-derived and community-sourced guidelines along with a model for future initiatives.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 121 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

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Article

Jyotsna Gupta, Shivendra Singh, Ramesh Pandita and Suneel Kumar Bhat

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the enrolment scenario of Library and Information Science (LIS) education in India offered through distance mode.

Design/methodology/approach

The scope of the study is limited to India, reflecting the trend of distance education in LIS in India. The study is based on the secondary data collected by the Ministry of Human Resource and Development, Government of India (GOI) under All India Survey on Higher Education (AISHE). It is to mention that Ministry of Human Resource and Development, GOI, is regularly collecting data from higher education institutions all across the country under AISHE project. The data in the study have been analysed for the period 2011 to 2018.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that, of the total enrolments made in LIS education in India during the period 2011 to 2018, nearly one-fourth of students were enrolled through regular mode and three-fourth were enrolled through distance mode, signifying distance mode of education as the largest medium of LIS education in India. The enrolment figures through distance mode showed slight inconsistency with the result, a negative (−0.49%) average annual corresponding growth was recorded in the enrolment of LIS students through distance mode. Of the total students enrolled in different LIS programmes through distance mode during the period of study, the majority (67.78%) of students were enrolled in the Under Graduate programme (B.Lib.I.Sc.). Similarly, of the total students enrolled in LIS through distance mode during the period of study, 51.36% were female students and 48.63% male students. In terms of caste category, of the total students enrolled during the period of study, 10.12% belonged to the Scheduled Caste category, 4.7% to Scheduled Tribes category, 28.77% Other Backward Class and 56.08% to others, which include general category students as well.

Research limitations/implications

Learning through distance education is a welcome step as long as the idea is to improve the society and to reach out to those who hitherto remained unreached. Sustainable means of enrolment and employability has to be the order of the day, mostly based on demand and supply principle.

Originality/value

This study is original and first of its kind covering enrolment of the students in LIS courses.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 69 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

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Article

Sultan M. Al‐Daihani

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore students' perceptions and views of the instructors, in relation to information and communications technology (ICT) education in library and information science (LIS) programs.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was carried out among students from the two LIS departments in Kuwait. A focus group was conducted with faculty members of the two institutions, who provided qualitative input about the instruction of ICT, needed changes, and relevance of market needs.

Findings

Participants showed dissatisfaction with the currently available ICT courses in the LIS programs. Students pointed out deficiencies and inadequacies in ICT resources and facilities, and suggested upgrading software and hardware. They appeared to be satisfied with the ICT skills being targeted by LIS programs. They also appeared to be satisfied with the ICT instructors. The study pointed out a need for collaboration with professional forums for continuing education programs and the need for revisions in curricula to introduce more focused courses that meet the needs of the ever‐changing market requirements and give the students access to professional bilingual materials. The faculty members noted the demands of the job market and proposed measures for addressing them through enhanced course content and improved opportunities for hands‐on instruction.

Originality/value

Earlier studies reported in the literature have discussed ICT education in broader terms. This study reports the situation of ICT education in IS programs in Kuwait, focusing on specific areas such as resource, curricula, and instructors.

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Article

Keren Dali and Nadia Caidi

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of the field with an eye on discerning the best ways to build and develop the recruitment narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reached out to 57 LIS graduate programs in Canada and the USA accredited by the American Library Association through a Web-based survey; the questions presented a combination of multiple-choice, short-answer and open-ended questions and generated a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The online survey has disclosed that students may not have an in-depth understanding of current trends, the diversity of LIS professions and the wider applications of their education. A significant disconnect exists in how the goals of LIS education are seen by certain groups of practitioners, students and faculty members.

Originality/value

Creating a program narrative for the purposes of recruitment and retention, departments should not only capitalize on the reach of the internet and the experiences of successful practitioners. They should also ensure that faculty know their students’ personal backgrounds, that students empathize with demands of contemporary academia and that a promotional message connects pragmatic educational goals to broader social applications. By exposing and embracing the complexity of LIS education and practice, the paper chooses a discursive path to start a conversation among major stakeholders.

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Article

Yazdan Mansourian

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of an action research on students’ perceptions of their area of study, Library and Information Science (LIS). The paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report findings of an action research on students’ perceptions of their area of study, Library and Information Science (LIS). The paper aims to demonstrate how an inquiry‐based learning (IBL) can help students to gain a more realistic view of their discipline and consequently become more involved in the active learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected in two phases during an academic year. The data collection tools were observation, interview, and questionnaire with open‐ended questions. In total, 38 first‐year LIS undergraduate students at Tarbiat Mollem University (TMU) in Tehran formed the target group. The study adopted a qualitative approach to seek a deep insight into the case and did not attempt to generalize the results.

Findings

At the beginning of the first semester, most of the students did not possess a clear and realistic view of their discipline and they had to cope with uncertainty and ambiguity about their future career. Employing IBL approach in teaching LIS modules was an efficient way to prepare students for deeper involvement with learning activities and it helps them to gain a better understanding of their discipline's scope, which consequently can prepare them for lifelong and independent learning in future.

Research limitations/implications

LIS schools can use the suggestions in the paper to provide their students with more chances of enjoying IBL techniques. However, the paper is based on a small group of students in a specific context and the results cannot be easily generalized.

Originality/value

The effects of LIS students’ perceptions on their study progression have not been addressed before and this paper can enhance our knowledge on this issue.

Details

Library Review, vol. 59 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

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Article

Younis Al-Shwabkah, Faten Hamad, Nashrawan Taha and Maha Al-Fadel

This study aims to explore undergraduate students’ perceptions of teaching information and communication technology (ICT) courses in the library and information science …

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore undergraduate students’ perceptions of teaching information and communication technology (ICT) courses in the library and information science (LIS) program in Jordanian universities. It also aims at investigating the correlation between the impact of some variables, namely, gender, the type of university, academic year and student GPA on and their students’ views.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative methods were adopted. A questionnaire with 40 items was distributed on a stratified random sample of 220 students from four LIS departments in Jordan and, of whom, 203 responded with a response rate of 92.3 per cent.

Findings

Research findings indicated that teaching ICT courses was considered highly important. Students stressed on the importance of incorporating ICT courses in LIS programs. They also pointed out the competence of the teaching staff and the efficacy of their teaching methods. On the other hand, student assessments of the curriculum content, the teaching pedagogy and methods of assessment were on an average level. In addition, the findings indicated that resources and facilities necessary to teach ICT courses were available and adequate. It was noted that the “university” was the only factor that affected results; the University of Jordan students showed a higher satisfaction. The other factors (gender, academic year and GPA) did not appear to affect student perceptions.

Originality/value

Previous studies investigated the importance of teaching ICT courses in general but did not consider students’ perceptions. Only a few studies discussed students’ perceptions of studying ICT courses but in a different context, i.e. Kuwait. This research focused on students’ perceptions of studying ICT in Jordan as a new geographic region. This would be beneficial for other developing countries to learn from this experience and refine their ICT curricula and LIS programs accordingly.

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