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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2013

Melissa A. Hubbard and Amber T. Loos

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which academic libraries participate in and assess initiatives to increase or maintain student enrollment levels at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine the extent to which academic libraries participate in and assess initiatives to increase or maintain student enrollment levels at colleges and universities in the US.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey of academic library directors in the US was conducted. The 31 question survey was distributed via email to 321 librarians in the sample population. The survey response rate was 42.7 percent. Quantitative data were analyzed using SPSS 19.0 and qualitative data were coded according to recruitment or retention strategy.

Findings

Regardless of institution type or size, libraries in the sample population were just as likely to participate in recruitment and retention initiatives. However, some libraries stood out as particularly active in recruitment and retention initiatives. Indicators of active library participation were identified.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate for the survey did not generate a statistically significant sample size, given the population. However, the data generated here contribute significantly to the relatively scant literature on academic library participation in retention and recruitment activities. The findings also suggest the need for the profession to focus on creating assessment tools to measure library impact on recruitment and retention.

Originality/value

No other studies have surveyed the academic library field to document the extent to which they participate in and assess recruitment and retention initiatives.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 1 December 2009

Goldie S. Byrd and Christopher L. Edwards

HBCUs are significant in their number and in the number of minority students they graduate annually. They are located across Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware…

Abstract

HBCUs are significant in their number and in the number of minority students they graduate annually. They are located across Alabama, Arkansas, California, Delaware, District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia. They make up approximately 3% of the nation's institutions of postsecondary education. In 2001, they enrolled more than 14% of all Black students in higher education, and more than 30% of Blacks graduated with a baccalaureate degree, according to the National Center for Education Statistics (2004). There are 40 four-year public institutions, 49 four-year private institutions, 11 two-year public institutions, and 5 two-year private institutions. North Carolina has 11 HBCUs, more than any other state. Alabama has nine HBCUs, and Georgia and South Carolina have eight each. Both Mississippi and Texas have seven HBCUs. The first HBCU, Cheyney University, was founded in 1837. It was followed by two other historically Black institutions, Lincoln University in Pennsylvania (1854) and Wilberforce University in Ohio (1856).

Details

Black American Males in Higher Education: Research, Programs and Academe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-643-4

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Keren Dali and Nadia Caidi

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of the field with an eye on discerning the best ways to build and develop the recruitment narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reached out to 57 LIS graduate programs in Canada and the USA accredited by the American Library Association through a Web-based survey; the questions presented a combination of multiple-choice, short-answer and open-ended questions and generated a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The online survey has disclosed that students may not have an in-depth understanding of current trends, the diversity of LIS professions and the wider applications of their education. A significant disconnect exists in how the goals of LIS education are seen by certain groups of practitioners, students and faculty members.

Originality/value

Creating a program narrative for the purposes of recruitment and retention, departments should not only capitalize on the reach of the internet and the experiences of successful practitioners. They should also ensure that faculty know their students’ personal backgrounds, that students empathize with demands of contemporary academia and that a promotional message connects pragmatic educational goals to broader social applications. By exposing and embracing the complexity of LIS education and practice, the paper chooses a discursive path to start a conversation among major stakeholders.

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Book part
Publication date: 28 February 2019

Sayo O. Fakayode, Jennifer Jennings Davis, Linus Yu, Paulette Ann Meikle, Ron Darbeau and Georgia Hale

Strengthening the nation’s technological workforce, competing and expanding its relevance in the global economy, and maintaining personal as well as homeland security will…

Abstract

Strengthening the nation’s technological workforce, competing and expanding its relevance in the global economy, and maintaining personal as well as homeland security will be highly dependent on the quantity, quality, and diversity of the next generations of scientists, engineers, technologists, and mathematicians. Production of a diverse generation of human resources with relevant, competitive skills is critical. However, so too is the need to raise an enlightened citizenry with cross-cultural experience and cultural awareness competency, with a broad worldview and global perspectives. These requirements are critical to understanding the challenges and opportunities of scholarly activity in a pluralistic global environment and positioning ourselves to capitalize upon them. Scholars with cross-cultural experience and competency are empowered to adapt and work collaboratively, nationally and globally, with scholars of different races, geopolitical, socioeconomic, and cultural backgrounds. Development of effective strategies to transform science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) departments for inclusion and to broaden the participation in STEM across cultures, socioeconomic standing, race, and gender in higher education has been a dominant topic of pedagogical interest of national priority in the last several decades. However, success in these endeavors is achievable only through systemic change and a cultural shift to address the underlying root causes of socioeconomic disparity, gender, and racial disparities and a paucity of cultural awareness among all educational stakeholders. STEM departments can only be truly transformed for inclusion through the development of sensitive, creative, and student-engaging curricula and targeted recruitment and retention of underrepresented minorities in STEM. Formation of well-coordinated alliances spanning educational sectors, governmental and non-governmental organizations, and community engagement and outreach are also critical to promoting inclusive and broad participation in STEM education.

The first section of the chapter gives an introduction to various challenges, obstacles, and hindrances that prevent a successful transformation of K–12 science education as well as STEM departments in higher education for inclusion. The second section discusses historical perspectives of the University of Arkansas-Fort Smith (UAFS) – the institutional profile, missions, and visions of UAFS as a regional university. Policies and strategies for addressing the socioeconomic disparity, faculty gender, and racial disparities and cultural competency awareness at UAFS are also highlighted in this section. Other approaches including targeted efforts to recruit and retain underrepresented minority students, provision of financial assistance for students from low-income families, and a creative “Math-up” curriculum innovation to promote inclusive and broad participation in STEM at UAFS are highlighted in the latter section of the chapter. Formation of alliances between UAFS, local K–12 school districts, and governmental and non-governmental agencies to promote broad participation in STEM at UAFS are discussed. The last section of the chapter provides recommendations for adaptation and sustainability of strategies and efforts aimed at transforming national STEM departments for inclusion.

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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2017

J. T. Snipes and Carl Darnell

Desegregation still remains a pressing issue of many of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the United States. This chapter provides a historical…

Abstract

Desegregation still remains a pressing issue of many of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the United States. This chapter provides a historical narrative of the history of desegregation in the United States, and how legal ruling impacts recruitment and retention of non-Black students at HBCUs. In addition, this chapter will examine landmark desegregation court cases and current challenges imposed upon historically black colleges. Finally, implications will be provided for administrators at public HBCUs.

Details

Black Colleges Across the Diaspora: Global Perspectives on Race and Stratification in Postsecondary Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-522-5

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2018

Ken Coopwood and Shirlene Smith Augustine

The Diversity Fellows Program (DFP) was an initiative created within a Division for Diversity (DD) in response to imperatives for campus diversity leadership. In the…

Abstract

The Diversity Fellows Program (DFP) was an initiative created within a Division for Diversity (DD) in response to imperatives for campus diversity leadership. In the author’s reflection/perceptions, it brought forward a new paradigm for, Bistro University (BU) (pseudonym), as well as expansions in university–community and statewide relations. The DFP employed a multifaceted approach to climate transformation and was a joint development with the highest level of administration and utilized full, tenured, underrepresented, and women faculty to lead initiatives that engaged faculty in research relationships with students, STEM communities, mentoring, and unit accountability for hiring and retention. The result was the creation of several best-practice initiatives, which showcased unsung and/or underutilized student and faculty research as catalysts for recruitment, retention, and promotion, and improved unit accountability for diversification and campus/community relations. The authors assert that the DFP ultimately represented a multipoint approach to climate transformation rooted in relationship building, measurable accountability, and partnership development. This chapter will expound on the creation and impact the DFP had on BU’s diversity agenda and the DD mission. It will also illuminate the author’s perspectives of successes as well as struggles to be expected while setting standards for excellence in academic diversity innovation. Finally, this chapter challenges senior administrators and academics to increase support and reward innovation associated with cultural competence training, multicultural engagement, and best practices for diversity administration.

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Stephen Carter and Amy Chu-May Yeo

The purpose of this paper is to investigate two areas of interest: first, to determine business student customer satisfiers that could be contributors to students’ current…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate two areas of interest: first, to determine business student customer satisfiers that could be contributors to students’ current and predicted retention in a higher educational institution (HEI) and second, to use these satisfiers to inform HEI marketing planning.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey used 10 per cent of the sampling frame from the faculty total business students population. Descriptive statistics and correlation were employed to describe and measure the relationship between the teaching and non-teaching antecedents of student satisfaction and their five constructs (academic experience, teaching quality, campus life, facilities and placement support) and current and intended retention. Standard multiple regressions were run to measure the β and significant values of the composite variables as stated.

Findings

Quantitative results revealed that students were most satisfied with academic experience and it was also the most dominant predictor of studentsretention. Other elements such as quality teaching, facilities and internship, though important for student satisfaction, were not predictors of retention.

Research limitations/implications

Findings based on one Malaysian institution could not be used as a representation of other institutions either locally or internationally.

Practical implications

Suggestions are made as to how HEIs can defend and safeguard their existing and future position by giving maximum attention to both “hard” and “soft” student satisfiers which would add customer value and strengthen their competitive position.

Originality/value

Based on teaching and non-teaching antecedents and constructs, enable HEIs to predict retention and so inform marketing planning in a highly competitive higher education environment.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Enes Gök and Sedat Gümüş

Higher education institutions around the world compete with one another in the internationalization zone. One of the biggest competitions centers on the mobility of…

Abstract

Higher education institutions around the world compete with one another in the internationalization zone. One of the biggest competitions centers on the mobility of students fighting for the share from the student market pie. The Turkish higher education system, as an emerging competitor, also participates in this competition. While many studies focus on international students in Turkish higher education institutions, the literature lacks information about why Turkish institutions participate in this game, and what tools and strategies they use in this endeavor. This study examined the rationales and strategies of higher education institutions using a semistructured online survey data collected from international offices at participating institutions. Findings revealed that Turkish higher education institutions attract international students to create a multicultural environment by increasing diversity at the campus and to increase the quality of the institution. In contrast to the findings in the literature, seeing international students as institutional revenue source was not among the rationales mentioned by the participant institutions. Besides the rationales, findings also revealed the strategies institutions use for their international student recruitment. Paralleling with the trending mechanisms used worldwide, Turkish institutions use similar strategies such as participating in fairs and events, advertisement through technology, web and social media, and using agents; however, there are also unique mechanisms created by Turkish institutions including visiting parents of current international students, high school visits, and summer camps as effective strategies. Additional research, with broader scope and depth is needed to better understand the internationalization of Turkish higher education.

Details

Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2017
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-765-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Paul Read, Gary Higgs and George Taylor

To highlight the potential (as well as perceived barriers) to the wider use of GIS in educational marketing.

Abstract

Purpose

To highlight the potential (as well as perceived barriers) to the wider use of GIS in educational marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Five case studies were conducted in order to identify the GIS capabilities that would be required by a typical educational institution. Using the knowledge gained from these case studies, a prototype “admissions GIS” based around a proprietary GIS package was developed.

Findings

Spatial approaches based around GIS should provide numerous benefits in educational marketing concerning, for example, the mapping and analysis of participation rates in relation to a variety of recruitment campaigns and widening participation strategies, in detecting changes in enrolment patterns and in the profiling of local areas in order to develop a range of courses designed to appeal to the customer segments therein.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has identified important barriers that will need to be overcome before such tools become more widely used in the higher education sector. The study has also highlighted concerns regarding the accuracy of particular data sets that became evident as the data were analysed. The findings from GIS‐based investigations could provide an important starting‐point for more qualitatively based follow‐up studies that may help explain the revealed patterns.

Practical implications

Widening access, student profiling, local area profiling and the availability of increasing amounts of geographically‐referenced data are all increasing the use of GIS, whose capabilities in mapping and geodemographics have led many to see it as an aid to student recruitment and retention in an increasingly crowded and competitive marketplace

Originality/value

There have been relatively few published studies of the potential of GIS, in conjunction with university administrative records and geodemographic techniques, in educational marketing. This study adds to this body of literature to demonstrate the current state of play and the perceived barriers to wider implementation and will be of particular relevance to those involved in marketing courses in higher education establishments.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Tamilla Curtis and John R. Ledgerwood

The purpose of this study is to identify students’ motivations and perceived benefits of engaging in study abroad programs, as well as challenges and missed opportunities.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify students’ motivations and perceived benefits of engaging in study abroad programs, as well as challenges and missed opportunities.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was sent to random samples of students on two university campuses. Descriptive statistics and frequency analyses were conducted with the use of the SPSS data management software package.

Findings

Despite the majority of students having previous international travel experience and understanding the benefits of study abroad programs, most of them will not pursue the possibility to enroll in the study abroad programs. Contrary, most of respondents did express an interest to participate in international co-op/internship opportunities while attending the university. The study identified motivations, perceived benefits and constraints for students to enroll in study abroad programs.

Research limitations/implications

Further research using samples from different universities and colleges would present a more comprehensive picture of motivations, expectations and constraints.

Practical implications

Educators should promote study abroad program benefits and clearly identify the link between international experiences and future students’ employability. Study abroad programs can serve as important tool for increasing overall studentsretention and recruitment.

Social implications

In higher education, study abroad programs can serve as important tool for increasing overall studentsretention and recruitment.

Originality/value

This research uncovers students’ study abroad intent, interests, motivations, perceived personal and professional benefits and desired structure for the program. The findings provide insights into how administrators can enhance the value of the summer study abroad program offered by higher educational institutions.

Details

Journal of International Education in Business, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-469X

Keywords

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