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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2016

Keren Dali and Nadia Caidi

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the attractiveness of Library and Information Science (LIS) careers to students and alumni and examine their decision-making process and perceptions of the field with an eye on discerning the best ways to build and develop the recruitment narrative.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reached out to 57 LIS graduate programs in Canada and the USA accredited by the American Library Association through a Web-based survey; the questions presented a combination of multiple-choice, short-answer and open-ended questions and generated a wealth of quantitative and qualitative data.

Findings

The online survey has disclosed that students may not have an in-depth understanding of current trends, the diversity of LIS professions and the wider applications of their education. A significant disconnect exists in how the goals of LIS education are seen by certain groups of practitioners, students and faculty members.

Originality/value

Creating a program narrative for the purposes of recruitment and retention, departments should not only capitalize on the reach of the internet and the experiences of successful practitioners. They should also ensure that faculty know their students’ personal backgrounds, that students empathize with demands of contemporary academia and that a promotional message connects pragmatic educational goals to broader social applications. By exposing and embracing the complexity of LIS education and practice, the paper chooses a discursive path to start a conversation among major stakeholders.

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Book part
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Lisa Buchter

This chapter explores the development of organizational narratives of identities for embodying the qualified jobseeker with disabilities in the French job market.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter explores the development of organizational narratives of identities for embodying the qualified jobseeker with disabilities in the French job market.

Methods/Approach

While the concept of “organizational narratives of identities” has primarily been used to study the access to services to individuals with “troubled identities,” my study looks at how organizational narratives are shaped in labor market intermediation for the professional integration of workers with disabilities.

Findings

In this context, fitting the right formula story goes beyond embodying the morally “deserving” target population in order to encompasses corporate-related expectations, such as demonstrating resilience and grit, as well as disclosure-related expectations, that navigates the contradictory injunction of the French antidiscrimination system to both demonstrate a commitment to diversity and to remain indifferent to differences.

Implications/Value

This chapter highlights the ways in which the cultural narratives surrounding disabled identities, workers’ identities, and the French cultural ideology of “indifference to differences” were translated into specific recruitment advice on the job market, as well as into organizational changes that favored the creation of a disability-friendly buffer zone in corporations: the activist disability manager. The chapter also shows how widely circulating cultural narratives shape, and are shaped by, organizational policies and procedures that can in turn shape personal experiences in the workforce.

Details

New Narratives of Disability
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-144-5

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Greer Johnson, Stephen Billett, Darryl Dymock and Gregory Martin

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological demonstration of how written and visual language in narrative and small stories about older workers might be read…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a methodological demonstration of how written and visual language in narrative and small stories about older workers might be read in multiple ways as supporting and/or constraining recent policy reform.

Design/methodology/approach

Critical theory and critical discourse analysis, supported by narrative analysis and visual analysis, offer a robust methodology to problematize the manner in which textually mediated discourses impact social policy reform for recruiting, retraining and retaining older workers.

Findings

The results show that still in such an “age positive” social policy environment, negative stereotypes about older workers persist, threatening to constrain social change.

Research limitations/implications

An exemplary analysis of two texts, representative of those related to Australian government initiatives to reform access to work for older citizens, provides an accessible means of (re)evaluating if and how such policies are more inclusive of older workers.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to an emerging trend in organization studies using a critical discourse analytic approach not only to written texts, but also to the less familiar visual narratives and stories.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 31 December 2010

Matthew P. Eddy

A growing number of human rights NGOs have placed international volunteers in conflict zones from Guatemala and Colombia to Palestine and Iraq. This study samples from…

Abstract

A growing number of human rights NGOs have placed international volunteers in conflict zones from Guatemala and Colombia to Palestine and Iraq. This study samples from contemporary high-risk transnational activists and highlights the variation in biographical steps taken toward the shared outcome of participation in human rights work (HRW). Data was collected through 6 weeks of participant observation in Israel-Palestine, 21 in-depth interviews, and 28 shorter focused interviews with human rights workers (N=49). Oversampling from the International Solidarity Movement reveals how the unique constraints and opportunities presented by a particular conflict zone and NGO culture impacts self-selection into HRW. Grounded theory and Boolean methodology aided in identifying four main pathways (the nonviolent activist, peace church, anarchist, and solidarity pathways) to HRW as well as biographical patterns and complexities that have been underemphasized in the existing literature. These include the salience of transformative events and attitude changes in the process of constructing a cosmopolitan identity and committing to high-risk transnational activism.

Details

Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-609-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2019

Myra Piat, Jessica Spagnolo, Suzanne Thibodeau-Gervais, Catherine Deschamps and Yves Gosselin

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, assess the effects of the peers’ recovery narratives on service users’ perceived mental health recovery; and second, explore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, assess the effects of the peers’ recovery narratives on service users’ perceived mental health recovery; and second, explore various stakeholders’ perspectives on the program, specifically its facilitators and barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a convergent mixed-method design. First, a pre-test post-test design was used with service users to evaluate the peer recovery narrative program. They completed the Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS) and participated in qualitative interviews that explored perspectives on their mental health recovery before and after the program. Second, a cross-sectional design was used to explore stakeholder groups’ perspectives on the recovery narrative program immediately after listening to the narratives.

Findings

While findings show that there was no statistical difference between scores on the RAS before and after the peer narratives, thematic analysis revealed a change in service users’ understanding of recovery post-narratives. Other stakeholder groups confirmed this change. However, some healthcare professionals questioned the universal positive effects of the peer recovery narrative program on service users. Stakeholders agreed that beyond effects of the peer recovery narrative program on service users, there were also positive effects among the peers themselves.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first Canadian study, and one of the first studies to rely on mixed-methods and various stakeholder groups to evaluate the impact of peer recovery narratives on service users. The research, thus, fills a knowledge gap on peer recovery narratives.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Lindsey M. Harper

The American Library Association has worked for decades to increase its diversity of individuals from underrepresented groups; however, existing diversity programs in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The American Library Association has worked for decades to increase its diversity of individuals from underrepresented groups; however, existing diversity programs in the United States yield just enough new library and information science professionals to replace those retiring or leaving the profession prematurely.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper involved performing a review of the literature to assess recruitment and retention strategies of individuals from underrepresented groups within the LIS profession.

Findings

This article examines the problems with existing diversity initiatives within the profession and suggests how the field can recruit both students and employees from underrepresented groups. This article offers new ways to recruit students and employees (e.g. how to create job postings and interview questions) and speaks about strategies for retaining LIS students and employees from underrepresented groups (e.g. formal and informal mentoring networks). Finally, this article offers some suggestions to create a more inclusive environment for LIS students and professionals alike.

Originality/value

This paper offers practical suggestions to increase representation of individuals from underrepresented groups that LIS programs and libraries alike can implement. Suggestions for how to create an inclusive work environment are also presented.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 31 January 2011

Bob McDonald and Yaser Mir

UK government counter‐terrorism policy in the wake of the London bombings of 7 July 2005 has included an evolving set of measures seeking to engage the support of and…

Abstract

UK government counter‐terrorism policy in the wake of the London bombings of 7 July 2005 has included an evolving set of measures seeking to engage the support of and productive interaction with UK citizens, so as to help oppose violent extremist ideology, to thwart potential sympathy for its proponents and to avert future incidents. The primary focus of such attempts has been Al‐Qaida‐influenced violent extremism. Government preventative measures have provoked controversy, especially in British Muslim communities. The article examines their reaction, from research commissioned by the Metropolitan Police Service and undertaken in London by the International School for Communities, Rights and Inclusion (ISCRI) from the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan), in its community engagement (CE) Pathfinder programme. The findings from this research find many parallels in recent academic literature and other commentaries. The authors contend that some government programmes have erroneously served to stigmatise UK Muslim communities ‘en masse’, which has been counter‐productive to the government objective of gaining community support and involvement, and has thereby compromised the effectiveness of counterterrorism preventative measures. The article highlights a different emphasis and some specific elements for a revised prevention policy in counter terrorism from consideration of these sources, including the primary evidence from Muslim communities themselves in the community engagement Pathfinder programme.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2019

Edward Tristram Albert

The purpose of this study is to explore the current use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the recruitment and selection of candidates. More specifically, this research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the current use of artificial intelligence (AI) in the recruitment and selection of candidates. More specifically, this research investigates the level, rate and potential adoption areas for AI-tools across the hiring process.

Design/methodology/approach

To fulfill that purpose, a two-step approach was adopted. First, the literature was extensively reviewed to identify potential AI-application areas supporting the recruitment and selection (R&S) process. Second, primary research was carried out in the form of semi-structured thematic interviews with different types of R&S specialists including HR managers, consultants and academics to evaluate how much of the AI-applications areas identified in the literature review are being used in practice.

Findings

This study presents a multitude of findings. First, it identifies 11 areas across the R&S Process where AI-applications can be applied. However, practitioners currently seem to rely mostly on three: chatbots, screening software and task automation tools. Second, most companies adopting these AI-tools tend to be larger, tech-focussed and/or innovative firms. Finally, despite the exponential rate of AI-adoption, companies have yet to reach an inflection point as they currently show reluctance to invest in that technology for R&S.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the qualitative and exploratory nature behind the research, this study displays a significant amount of subjectivity, and therefore, lacks generalisability. Despite this limitation, this study opens the door to many opportunities for academic research, both qualitative and quantitative.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the huge research gap surrounding AI in R&S, pertaining specifically to the scarcity and poor quality of the current academic literature. Furthermore, this research provides a comprehensive overview of the state of AI in R&S, which will be helpful for academics and practitioners looking to rapidly gain a holistic understanding of AI in R&S.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 18 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 18 March 2019

Melina Czymoniewicz-Klippel, Ryan Chesnut, Jennifer DiNallo and Daniel Perkins

Employing brief, low-intensity, face-to-face parenting programs can result in improvements in parenting and child behavior; however, their usefulness is often limited by…

Abstract

Purpose

Employing brief, low-intensity, face-to-face parenting programs can result in improvements in parenting and child behavior; however, their usefulness is often limited by low participation rates. Online technologies are increasingly presented as a panacea for promoting program reach in a cost-effective way. The extant literature, however, provides limited guidance on issues around the implementation of online parenting programs. Grow is a universal, health-promoting parenting program that targets families with 5–10 year olds and was developed for face-to-face delivery and then adapted for a web-based format. The purpose of this paper is to present implementation results from feasibility proof of concept studies of Grow Face-to-Face and Grow Online and explores issues regarding mode of delivery and parent participation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from participants using attendance records, end-of-module/session surveys and semi-structured, in-depth interviews, and were examined using descriptive statistics and inductive thematic analysis.

Findings

Findings suggest that, compared to the online implementation, recruitment was more difficult for the face-to-face implementation. Conversely, retention in the online program was poorer than in the face-to-face program. Participants from both programs self-reported high levels of engagement and satisfaction. Parents who completed Grow Online expressed a desire for more interpersonal interactions, which suggests a possible need for hybrid programs that combine online technologies with traditional face-to-face modes of delivery.

Originality/value

These findings challenge the idea that the internet can fully address barriers to parenting program participation by showing that while parents may sign up more readily for an online program, they may struggle to complete all modules. This is problematic as program dosage can influence parent and child outcomes.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Helen Francis

This paper presents a discourse‐analytic approach to the study of human resource management (HRM) and organisational change, which is more sensitive than conventional…

Abstract

This paper presents a discourse‐analytic approach to the study of human resource management (HRM) and organisational change, which is more sensitive than conventional research designs to the dynamic role of language in shaping processes of change. The prevailing positivism within business and management research is noted, in which language is treated as unproblematic; it simply mirrors or represents an objective “reality” that can be measured in some way. In contrast, discourse‐based studies accept that language is not simply reflective of reality, but is significant in constituting reality. The paper moves on to examine the potential of discourse‐based studies to offer fresh insights into the role of HRM in producing change. Drawing on the work of Ford and Ford, change is treated as a “shift in conversation” and case‐study evidence is presented of the surfacing of a change initiative within a large UK manufacturing firm.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

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