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Article
Publication date: 5 March 2018

Linda D. Peters, Andrew D. Pressey, Alan J.P. Gilchrist and Wesley J. Johnston

Recent research places an increased emphasis on the inclusion of the customer in value creation, learning and innovation processes; yet, there remains a gap in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Recent research places an increased emphasis on the inclusion of the customer in value creation, learning and innovation processes; yet, there remains a gap in the understanding of just how such customer involvement may work. This paper aims to address this gap by examining two aspects of customer involvement – their knowledgeability and their agency. In addition, three boundaries (semantic, syntactic and pragmatic) across which relationship development occurs and which may facilitate and/or inhibit value co-creation, collaborative learning and innovation processes have been explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Three case studies have been used. Two were large-scale construction projects in the UK, and one was a global professional accounting firm in the USA.

Findings

Customers may become frustrated if not allowed to exercise their agency. However, their involvement can create tensions for suppliers who may have to become more tolerant of divergent goals. In respect of knowledgeability, it was found that constraint satisfaction is important in allowing customers to reconcile their personal knowledge schema with the collective schema. However, it was also noted that customer knowledgeability brings with it challenges for suppliers, who must find ways to add value for such customers.

Research limitations/implications

A number of further questions relating to the agency and knowledgeability of customers and their inclusion in value co-creation, collaborative learning and innovation processes have been posed. The need for guidance in identifying and minimising the barriers to crossing semantic, syntactic and pragmatic boundaries between customers and suppliers has also been highlighted.

Originality/value

This study makes an important contribution to research in the field, in that how the inclusion of the customer in business networks alters current assumptions and practices is investigated.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Issam Kouatli

The university social responsibility (USR) is still in embryonic stage compared to corporate social responsibility (CSR) which is still debatable by researchers. The…

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Abstract

Purpose

The university social responsibility (USR) is still in embryonic stage compared to corporate social responsibility (CSR) which is still debatable by researchers. The purpose of this paper is to propose the contemporary dimension (on top of teaching and research dimensions) of USR in most educational institutes. Based on this new definition, a proposal of a mechanism to quantify USR sustainability was presented.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a review of the theme of the CSR with the inter-related recent research on USR with researchers perspectives, characteristics of USR were identified and incorporated in the proposed newly definition of USR. The new definition takes into account the interrelationship of university–corporate communication and create shared value (CSV) principle, as well as the knowledgeability and sustainability.

Findings

Based on the review of most active research in the USR development and the concluded contemporary definition of USR, this paper proposes a new extended version of sustainability suitable for educational institutes, where it is composed of different zones, and each zone was defined in terms of value of sustainability with associated knowledgeability in each zone. The Green Cloud project was taken as a vehicle to demonstrate collaboration between a university and cloud service provider located in Middle East (Dubai). Sustainability quantification was provided with hypothetical numbers to illustrate the technique.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is focused on University-specific social responsibility rather than general CSR. The proposed contemporary definition of the USR is a hybrid of a mutated latest research on CSR as well as cascaded recent development on USR. The view of this new definition can have different arguments depending on the ideology (communitarianism as opposed to individualism) adopted by specific university admiration of the objective of social responsibility which is sometimes driven by the political and strategic views of countries and the regions. However, the proposed sustainability zone-split between the CSV type of projects and the reputation values (described via hypothetical example) can minimize the gap between the two ideologies.

Originality/value

This paper attempts to provide a universally acceptable definition of the USR based on different points of views of researchers and tries to accommodate both ideologies toward social responsibility into one coherent framework. The sustainability Venn diagram was extended and made suitable for educational institutes. This approach facilitates the mechanism of quantifying the value of sustainability of a university or educational institutes. Hypothetical “Green Cloud” project was used as a mechanism to show the quantification process.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2020

Yoel Asseraf, Itzhak Gnizy and Aviv Shoham

Marketing doctrine (MD) refers to a “firm's unique principles, distilled from its experiences, which provide firm-wide guidance on market-facing choices” (Challagalla et

Abstract

Purpose

Marketing doctrine (MD) refers to a “firm's unique principles, distilled from its experiences, which provide firm-wide guidance on market-facing choices” (Challagalla et al., 2014, p. 4). Drawing on the knowledge-based view, the purpose of this paper is to develop a model of how MD is used and provide the first quantitative test of its relationship with business success.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors advance the understanding of MD by providing a mixed-methods paper. In Study 1, a survey-based quantitative study was used. The final sample comprised 349 internationally active strategic business units (SBUs) of Israeli firms. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling. Study 2 provides insights into the use of MD based on 20 in-depth interviews.

Findings

The cross-sectional evidence shows that there tends to be more MD Use in higher-performing firms. The important roles of MD Clarity and MD Knowledgeability as mobilising processes of MD Use are demonstrated. Learning by doing impacts MD Use only through MD Clarity and MD Knowledgeability.

Practical implications

MD is a new strategic tool that can be applied practically. MD may provide a straightforward way of communication between international ventures. MD Use may allow global consistency and flexibility within local markets, simultaneously. Therefore, marketing managers are advised to supplement MD to their portfolio of management tools.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to investigate empirically, through newly developed scales, whether and how MD's core processes (learning by doing, MD Clarity, MD Knowledgeability and MD Use) are related to the success of international ventures.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Kelly McKenna and Levi Altringer

This study aims to investigate the Colorado state university (CSU) MOVES online, transportation module, which was implemented for the dual purpose of promoting alternative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the Colorado state university (CSU) MOVES online, transportation module, which was implemented for the dual purpose of promoting alternative modes of transportation and while providing students with the information and skills necessary to comfortably and safely commute on and around campus without a personal motor vehicle.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed methods research tests the effect of the CSU MOVES transportation module on students’ familiarity, comfortability and knowledgeability, the researchers investigate within- and across-group changes in student survey responses over time.

Findings

The educational transportation module had an immediate and significant impact on the students’ familiarity, comfortability and knowledgeability regarding alternative and active transportation methods and this effect lasted over the semester. In addition, participating students experienced much larger gains in their knowledgeability of safe active transportation practices.

Research limitations/implications

The CSU MOVES survey data was limited in multiple ways, including self-selection into participation and completion of the transportation module, as well as the small sample size and lack of an authentic control group.

Originality/value

Universities and colleges across the country are becoming critically aware of issues surrounding transportation on and around campus and CSU is one of the first universities to join together with the local community to implement a transportation education module. Transportation initiatives have been motivated by multiple factors such as the supply of and demand for parking on and around campuses, sustainability efforts to reduce carbon emissions associated with university operations and the promotion of student health through active lifestyle practices.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 June 2012

Linda D. Peters

Purpose – This chapter proposes three main objectives in relation to understanding customer involvement in business networks. First, to identify important aspects of the…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter proposes three main objectives in relation to understanding customer involvement in business networks. First, to identify important aspects of the network structure and environment and how the actions of the customer and other network participants create and maintain these. Second, to identify and explore the mechanisms and processes of resource integration in the network. Third, to identify the capabilities and competencies that customers bring to the network, and to understand how these are enhanced and developed.

Methodology/approach – Conceptual.

Research implications – We recognize that aspects of the resources themselves are important and that the characteristics of the resource and the way in which partners align them were key components of resource analysis.

Practical implications – We note that the interaction of different operant and operand resource combinations opens new doors to customer knowledgeability and involvement, where power over either authoritative or allocative resources in itself will not guarantee value creation.

Social implications – We support the call for the development of more sociologically enriched and complex models of interagent resource exchange. In particular, we would advise the need for a better understanding of how different network structures and environments are created and maintained through domination, legitimation, and signification processes.

Originality/value of chapter – This chapter addresses the gap in our understanding of how customer involvement in business-to-business networks may influence learning, value cocreation, and innovation. This chapter makes an important contribution to research in the field in that it investigates how the inclusion of the customer in business networks alters current assumptions and practices.

Details

Special Issue – Toward a Better Understanding of the Role of Value in Markets and Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-913-4

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2017

Erik Poutsma and Paul E. M. Ligthart

This chapter investigates the differences in share-plan participation among various employee groups and why these differences exist. For strategic and tactical reasons…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the differences in share-plan participation among various employee groups and why these differences exist. For strategic and tactical reasons, inequality may result from an employer’s choice to distinguish among groups when allocating or offering shares. Differences among groups are also based on employee preferences. In addition, differences may be caused by social stratification, which limits access to plans for certain groups. Using these three perspectives, this study found important demographic differences in participation and received benefits. The study revealed that employers tend to focus on high-level personnel. It also found that employees may differ in how knowledgeable they are regarding share plans and how they value the usefulness of participating in share schemes.

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Alona Mykhaylenko, Brian V. Waehrens and Dmitrij Slepniov

The ability of an organisation’s headquarters (HQ) to bring value to and manage a globally dispersed multinational enterprise has been questioned in the existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The ability of an organisation’s headquarters (HQ) to bring value to and manage a globally dispersed multinational enterprise has been questioned in the existing literature. The purpose of this paper is to suggest that HQ-subsidiary distance is an important factor that affects such ability; this report also investigates the impact of distance on the HQ’s network management capabilities in the context of a global organisation’s evolution.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a single company was chosen to take part in a retrospective, longitudinal case study that highlighted two embedded product cases. The concept of distance was viewed as a variety of distance dimensions existing between the HQ and its subsidiaries.

Findings

The results indicated that distance impacted the effectiveness of the HQ’s network management capabilities by affecting HQ-subsidiary interaction and, consequently, shaping HQ’s knowledgeability about the subsidiaries’ operations. Moreover, the results suggested that the impact of such distance may shift from positive to negative over the course of a global organisation’s evolution.

Research limitations/implications

Although this study was explorative, some generalisability to industrial-goods companies of Scandinavian origin that have transferred activities to their owned subsidiaries may be expected. Further replication of the study using multiple case companies across various industries and countries is desirable.

Originality/value

This work extends the understanding of technological distance, sheds light on the conditions necessary for the HQ of a globally networked organisation to engage in value creation in the context of its evolution and contributes to the overall appreciation of distance as a factor that comprises multiple dimensions.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 July 2012

Arvid O.I. Hoffmann and Cornelia Birnbrich

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual as well as an empirical link between retail banks’ activities to protect their customers from third‐party fraud, the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish a conceptual as well as an empirical link between retail banks’ activities to protect their customers from third‐party fraud, the quality of customer relationships, and customer loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual framework is developed linking customer familiarity with and knowledge about fraud prevention measures, relationship quality, and customer loyalty. To empirically test the conceptual framework, data were collected in collaboration with a large German retail bank.

Findings

A positive association was found between customer familiarity with and knowledge about fraud prevention measures and the quality of customer relationships as measured by satisfaction, trust, and commitment. The quality of customer relationships, in turn, is positively associated with customer loyalty as measured by intentions to continue their relationship with and cross‐buy other products from their bank.

Research limitations/implications

The paper focuses on the German retail banking market and uses data from only one bank. Future research may investigate the generalizability of the findings across other banks, as well as other countries. Moreover, future research could address how specific anti‐fraud instruments and their communication differentially affect customer satisfaction, trust, and commitment.

Practical implications

The results stress the importance of fraud prevention for retail banks and show that besides the financial objective of reducing operating costs, fraud prevention and its effective communication is a meaningful way to improve customer relationship quality and, ultimately, customer loyalty.

Originality/value

This is the first academic study to empirically examine the relationship between a retail bank's (communication about) fraud prevention mechanisms and the quality of their customer relationships.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2016

Elaine Pamela Harris, Deryl Northcott, Moataz Moamen Elmassri and Jari Huikku

In the field of strategic investment decision making (SIDM) a body of research has grown up via international case studies and organisation-based fieldwork. However, there…

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Abstract

Purpose

In the field of strategic investment decision making (SIDM) a body of research has grown up via international case studies and organisation-based fieldwork. However, there has been little systematic theorisation around SIDM processes and practices. The purpose of this paper is to show how strong structuration theory (SST) can be employed to guide how future SIDM studies are conducted and theorised.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw upon the concepts from SST to reanalyse prior empirically based work. The authors apply SST-informed analysis to four SIDM case studies selected from the total of 18 published over the period 1970-2016 to explore the utility of SST compared with other approaches.

Findings

The analysis highlights the role of agents’ knowledgeability and position-practice relations in SIDM, which has largely been neglected by prior studies. The authors demonstrate the potential of SST to inform meso-level theorising by applying it to four published case studies. Whilst the authors argue for the adoption of SST, the authors also identify key methodological and conceptual issues in using SST in SIDM research.

Research limitations/implications

The examples and recommendations could assist management accounting researchers, particularly those engaged in case studies and organisational fieldwork, to build knowledge via the improved comparison, integration and theorisation of cases undertaken by different researchers in different contexts.

Originality/value

The authors offer a bridge between SST concepts and case study evidence for theorising, carrying out and analysing case study and field research on SIDM.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Frank Webster

Critically examines claims for the use of information and communication technologies for the easy availability of information and so for the improvement of citizen…

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Abstract

Critically examines claims for the use of information and communication technologies for the easy availability of information and so for the improvement of citizen participation in democratic processes. Examines the quality as opposed to the quantity of information available and discusses the nature of the information infrastructure as envisioned in the New Library: The People’s Network report against the historical reality of the failure of established systems to fulfill their potential and the characteristics of the present information environment. Considers attacks on the established public library system and discusses the nature of official information as embodied in official statistics. Examines the commercialisation of broadcasting, the decline of public service broadcasting and the failure of radio and television to develop in private hands into vehicles for mass education, concluding that where quality of content is paramount for information purposes over techniques of presentation, the claims for technological solutions for the information age are overstated.

Details

Library Review, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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1 – 10 of 329