Search results

1 – 10 of 637
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2018

Frank Peck, Keith Jackson and Gail Mulvey

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which growth-oriented small and micro-businesses (SMBs) are affected by regulations. Case studies from North-West…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the ways in which growth-oriented small and micro-businesses (SMBs) are affected by regulations. Case studies from North-West England are used to investigate the relationship between attitudes and responses to regulation and the characteristics of business growth.

Design/methodology/approach

This research examines the relationship between regulation and growth using eight case studies of SMBs. The selected cases are proactive in seeking new market opportunities and innovative in terms of product development or business process.

Findings

Case studies confirm that owner-managers of SMBs experience high levels of regulatory burden. However, some growth-oriented businesses also recognise the advantages in being proactive in seeking regulatory knowledge. These advantages were particularly prevalent in cases where growth is driven by product innovation in relatively new product markets.

Research limitations/implications

The study is based on a limited number of case studies in one region of England. Even so, interviews facilitate probing to increase understanding of the underlying reasons for attitudes towards regulation. The cases demonstrate that even very small businesses can use regulatory knowledge as a basis for business growth.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that networking in order to engage with regulatory regimes can generate competitive advantages and open up new market opportunities for small businesses.

Originality/value

This research contributes towards the debate on the impact of regulations on the economy at the micro level and in doing so highlights important nuances in the relationship between business growth and the regulatory environment.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2016

Roger Marshall, Leonard Ling Ping Chih, Peh Yam Khim and Goh Whee Cheng

Understanding the nature and distribution of influence within buying centres is of critical importance to researchers in organisational buying behaviour (Dawes, Lee, &…

Abstract

Understanding the nature and distribution of influence within buying centres is of critical importance to researchers in organisational buying behaviour (Dawes, Lee, & Dowling, 1998). However, the effects of the Internet on organisational buying behaviour remain rather vague. The primary objective of this study is to examine the effects of the Internet on the distribution of influence within buying centres. In particular, the study aims to identify the changes in levels of influence among key players at each stage of the organisational buying process due to the introduction of the Internet as a means of gathering information. Two groups of companies, representing high-internet-usage and low-internet-usage companies are identified. Results show that there is a significant difference in the distribution of influence within buying centres between the two groups where the level of influence of general managers tend to decline while functional managers tend to enjoy increased levels of influence in high-internet-usage companies.

Details

Making Tough Decisions Well and Badly: Framing, Deciding, Implementing, Assessing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-120-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2018

Obinna S. Muogboh and Francis Ojadi

With the world gradually evolving into a global economy, Africa is playing an increasing role both as a major supplier of commodities and a huge consumer market for…

Abstract

With the world gradually evolving into a global economy, Africa is playing an increasing role both as a major supplier of commodities and a huge consumer market for products from other parts of the world. Hence, it has become necessary for organisations to understand logistics and supply chain management (SCM) practices in Africa. For organisations that operate in Africa or have business dealings in Africa, it has become a strategic competitive priority to understand the current state of logistics in Africa and identify the challenges and opportunities inherent in the system. Finally, it is essential to learn how to overcome the challenges and maximise the opportunities. This chapter provides a historical and contextual basis for some of the logistics and SCM practices in sub-Saharan Africa. It reviews the current state of logistics management in Africa and identifies the challenges and opportunities that confront anyone interested in doing business in Africa. We reviewed the indigenous management practices that pervade the logistics discipline and highlighted cultural, unique and anecdotal evidence of practices and characteristics peculiar to the African countries. In addition, a comparative analysis of the logistic performance of countries in the region was provided to help readers situate the discussion. We concluded the discussion with some practical suggestions on how to get the best out of the African logistics system.

Details

Indigenous Management Practices in Africa
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-849-7

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Keith Jackson

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 28 September 2020

Fabrice Stanley Julien and Patricia Drentea

Purpose – Differential racialization experiences influence ethnic and racial self-identification. This research assesses how ethnic self-identification colors perceptions…

Abstract

Purpose – Differential racialization experiences influence ethnic and racial self-identification. This research assesses how ethnic self-identification colors perceptions perceived discrimination and how this in turn influences adolescent depressive symptomatology.

Methodology/Approach – We use the second wave of the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS) to examine the children of Caribbean immigrants. This research uses descriptive statistics, bivariate, and multivariate analyses to test hypotheses. The primary statistical method used is linear regression with OLS estimators.

Findings – Variations in the depression score exist among the racial/ethnic groups, with those identifying as non-black Antillean experiencing greater depression than the other three groups, and those identifying as white Cuban experiencing the lowest depression levels. The findings also show that some of this association is due to perceived discrimination.

Research Limitations/Implications – Future research should examine the association between discrimination and mental health longitudinally. We did not explore this option due to the lack of availability of relevant variables across multiple waves of the study.

Originality/Value of Paper – The results have implications for better understanding the second generation and elucidate how race and ethnicity shape adolescent perceptions of discrimination, and how these perceptions, in turn, are associated with mental health.

Details

Race, Ethnicity, Gender and Other Social Characteristics as Factors in Health and Health Care Disparities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-798-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Sue Jackson and Gillian Morgan

North Kirklees, an urban area in the East of England, known to have a 6.8 per cent incidence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), embarked on a nurse‐led CHD primary…

Abstract

Purpose

North Kirklees, an urban area in the East of England, known to have a 6.8 per cent incidence of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD), embarked on a nurse‐led CHD primary prevention service in order to improve residents' health. This paper seeks to investigate this serice.

Design/methodology/approach

Keen to utilise the principles of performance management, the team applied the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) Excellence Model RADAR logic believing that it would strengthen their “results orientation”. This paper investigates the results.

Findings

Using RADAR, the team identified baseline data for CHD health indicators. The teams were then equipped to set targets for continuous improvement, thereby increasing their potential to progress local residents' health. The case‐study findings enable others to adopt a similar approach in their pursuit of excellence.

Research limitations/implications

The CHD Primary Prevention team focused only on performance results in the first instance and did not look at other EFQM Excellence Model results areas.

Originality/value

The paper describes an original case study into how nurses applied RADAR, which gives insight into the team's experiences during their 18‐month journey.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2007

Darin W. White and Keith Absher

The purpose of this paper is to examine the retail store decision criteria of customers in founder member states of the European Union and customers in Central and Eastern…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the retail store decision criteria of customers in founder member states of the European Union and customers in Central and Eastern European (CEE) accession member states.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature review we theorize that significant differences will exist between founder member state customers and CEE accession member customers and that retailers would be wise to forego a standardized retail mix in favour of strategies more precisely adapted to individual national markets. Utilizing a well‐established retail customer decision criteria scale, the authors collected data from 1,221 Eastern and Western EU customers.

Findings

It was found that CEE shoppers hold very high expectations of what they desire in a retail store. Indeed, their expectations were higher than those of founder member state customers on 21 of the 22 dimensions measured.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the convenience nature of the data collection method utilized in the current study, future research that examines these two groups might want to employ a more stratified sampling approach across all the countries. Other limitations that provide fertile ground for future studies include specific explorations of the retail decision criteria with more complex measurement scales, which tap each sub construct more thoroughly.

Practical implications

It is apparent that retailers should thoroughly evaluate new target markets, especially when they are distant and unfamiliar and they should pursue country‐adapted strategies when entering the new CEE accession states.

Originality/value

The paper presents some of the first empirical research that examines the diversity of retail preferences across the enlarged EU.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 August 2013

Keith Jackson

Abstract

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2011

Keith Jackson

Abstract

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 16 April 2012

Waldemar Pfoertsch and Hendrik Scheel

This chapter helps to establish a characterization system for industrial and consumer companies. Marketing science shows that industrial brands and consumer brands have to…

Abstract

This chapter helps to establish a characterization system for industrial and consumer companies. Marketing science shows that industrial brands and consumer brands have to be managed in significant different ways. The reason is the variety of distinctions. Marketing literature often fall back to the same definition for companies. Usually, companies are defined business-to-business (B2B) when they deal with other companies and business-to-consumer (B2C) when they make their revenues with private consumers. However, both definitions do not represent the knowledge from marketing literature about the specifications in both market categories. The characterization system here separates companies by the demand drivers (derivate and origin) of their costumers, by their communication strategy, by the roles individuals play in the buying process, and recommend the appropriate branding strategy. The results of a survey about B2B knowledge show how important such a characterizing system for the discussion is. Often managers have no clear picture of a company in terms of B2B and B2C marketing. The system helps them to find a common basis for understanding the crucial issues, based on an empirical analysis.

Details

Business-to-Business Marketing Management: Strategies, Cases, and Solutions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-576-1

1 – 10 of 637