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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Emmeline de Pillis and Kathleen K. Reardon

The purpose of this paper is to examine persuasion and personality variables as predictors of entrepreneurial intention in a cross‐cultural sample.

11758

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine persuasion and personality variables as predictors of entrepreneurial intention in a cross‐cultural sample.

Design/methodology/approach

Undergraduates in the USA and the Republic of Ireland completed measures of personal efficacy, achievement motivation, ambiguity tolerance, attitudes toward entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurial intention.

Findings

The results suggest that the decision to become an entrepreneur comes about differently in different cultures. US participants appear to perceive entrepreneurship as a societally sanctioned and appropriate outlet for their achievement motivation. While achievement motivation correlated with entrepreneurial intention for the US participants, this result did not obtain for the Irish subjects. In both cultures, those who have come to believe that being an entrepreneur is consistent with their self‐image showed strong entrepreneurial intention independent of their other beliefs about entrepreneurship. This study suggests that recollections of positive interpersonal and mass media messages about entrepreneurship encourage entrepreneurial intention – but only for US participants. Other factors discussed in this report appear to mitigate the effect of such recollections for the Irish.

Research limitations/implications

This study is part of a larger research program that includes following up on these participants at a later date. With longitudinal data, we will be able to track the relationship between stated entrepreneurial intention and later business startup.

Originality/value

This investigation compares factors influencing entrepreneurial intention in the USA and Ireland.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Kathleen A. Simons and Tracey J. Riley

Accounting practitioners and educators agree that effective oral and written communication skills are essential to success in the accounting profession. Despite numerous…

Abstract

Accounting practitioners and educators agree that effective oral and written communication skills are essential to success in the accounting profession. Despite numerous initiatives to improve accounting majors’ communication skills, many students remain deficient in this area. Communication literature suggests that one factor rendering these initiatives ineffective is communication apprehension (CA). There is general agreement that accounting students around the globe have higher levels of CA than other majors. Therefore, accounting educators interested in improving students’ communication skills need to be aware of the dimensions and implications of CA. This chapter provides a review of the relevant literature on CA, with a focus on CA in accounting majors. It also presents intervention techniques for use in the classroom and makes suggestions for future research.

Details

Advances in Accounting Education: Teaching and Curriculum Innovations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-851-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Alison Sheridan

A number of articles have appeared in the Harvard Business Review(HBR) in recent years in which reference is made to the traditional viewthat male = manager, and how this has…

1143

Abstract

A number of articles have appeared in the Harvard Business Review (HBR) in recent years in which reference is made to the traditional view that male = manager, and how this has worked against women making inroads into senior management positions. The HBR often intersperses cartoons among the articles – cartoons which appear to perpetuate the male‐as‐manager norm. The results of a content analysis of the cartoons appearing in the HBR over the five‐year period, 1988‐1992 are presented. The content analysis suggests women appear as marginal players in the cartoon images of the organizational world. Not only do women appear in substantially fewer cartoons than men, there is also a wide divergence in how men and women are portrayed. The most common representations of women are as wife or secretary, although there is the occasional nurse, air hostess and fortune‐teller! The images of men, however, are overwhelmingly associated with paid work. The images of women and men portrayed in the HBR perpetuate and reinforce the expectation that “male = manager”. It may be that such cartoons can be considered trivial on their own, but cumulatively they can play a powerful role in defining the “appropriate” person for the manager′s job.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 May 2023

Guillaume Desjardins, Anthony M. Gould and Kathleen Park

This study aims to fill a gap in the literature. The notion of giveaways/free has not been well addressed in management history literature and arguably is a valuable contribution…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to fill a gap in the literature. The notion of giveaways/free has not been well addressed in management history literature and arguably is a valuable contribution in that it has a strategic dimension.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual. It is a structured survey of ideas/opinions about the notion of “free” in commercial endeavor. The survey is organized largely from a historical perspective.

Findings

Several categories of “free” are delineated and placed into a historical and strategic context.

Originality/value

The work has strategic implications and lays out a new research agenda for management historians.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 April 2011

Leroy Robinson, Sue E. Neeley and Kathleen Williamson

This study seeks to combine components of service failure recovery and customer relationship management. It aims to develop a model of the antecedents of successful service…

5042

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to combine components of service failure recovery and customer relationship management. It aims to develop a model of the antecedents of successful service recovery that proposes relationships between employee empowerment, job satisfaction, self‐efficacy, employee ratings of the service firm's service recovery practices, and service technology usage.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey tool was used to collect data. The hypothesized model was tested utilizing structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results support the hypothesized relationships between the empowerment of employees and their job satisfaction and perceived self‐efficacy, as well as the relationships between job satisfaction and self‐efficacy and service recovery.

Practical implications

Managers may improve the implementation of service technology and service recovery strategies by increasing employee empowerment.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a significant gap in the current literature by linking the well‐established constructs of employee empowerment, job‐satisfaction, self‐efficacy and adaptability with measures of service failure recovery and service technology usage.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1987

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined…

Abstract

On April 2, 1987, IBM unveiled a series of long‐awaited new hardware and software products. The new computer line, dubbed the Personal Systems 30, 50, 60, and 80, seems destined to replace the XT and AT models that are the mainstay of the firm's current personal computer offerings. The numerous changes in hardware and software, while representing improvements on previous IBM technology, will require users purchasing additional computers to make difficult choices as to which of the two IBM architectures to adopt.

Details

M300 and PC Report, vol. 4 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0743-7633

Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Marc T. Swogger, Kathleen M. Montry, Zach Walsh and David S. Kosson

Early clinical accounts of psychopathy suggest important relationships between alcohol use and psychopathic traits that lead to fantastic and uninviting behavior. In particular…

Abstract

Purpose

Early clinical accounts of psychopathy suggest important relationships between alcohol use and psychopathic traits that lead to fantastic and uninviting behavior. In particular, alcohol was thought to facilitate antisocial behavior, including violence, among psychopathic individuals. The purpose of this paper is to report a review of studies that concurrently examine psychopathy and alcohol in relation to violent behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors searched electronic databases (PsycInfo, PUBMED) for all published studies between January 1960 and October 2016 that included the combination of alcohol and psychopathy, antisocial personality and violence, aggression.

Findings

The evidence converges to indicate that, in college and community samples, self-reported antisocial lifestyle traits interact with alcohol use to predict violence beyond that accounted for by either construct. However, in correctional and clinical samples, there is no evidence that the use of alcohol increases violence for individuals high in clinically measured antisocial lifestyle traits.

Originality/value

This is the first review of the empirical literature on relationships among psychopathy, alcohol, and violence. The authors provide recommendations for future research designed to fill gaps in the literature and lead to a greater understanding of the interplay among these variables.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2007

Dianne Sundby and C. Brooklyn Derr

The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective of the career life of Michael Driver, from the time of his Princeton graduate studies and early faculty years at Purdue…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a retrospective of the career life of Michael Driver, from the time of his Princeton graduate studies and early faculty years at Purdue University through the over three decades he spent at USC.

Design/methodology/approach

The history and development of his theoretical and research interests are presented, as well as the many contributions he made to both management consulting and the education of MBA students. His 1970s role in the founding and development of the Careers Division of the Academy of Management and his contributions to career research are highlighted and illuminate one of the critical periods in the renewal of the field. His orientation towards complexity and integration stand out as characteristics that positively impact theory building and research.

Findings

Michael Driver's career life was one of depth, scope, growth, and continuity. As a humanist, he would want us to not only continue our pursuits to better understand the complexities of human behavior, but to integrate them into something more meaningful.

Originality/value

This retrospective provides insight into the history and development of Mike Driver's theoretical and research interests and underscores his many contributions. The essay also highlights the history of career studies during the renewal period of the 1970s and 1980s. Hopefully, Mike Driver's legacy will inspire younger scholars to extend the field and carry it forward.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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