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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

John D. Overby

Within the last two decades over 60 million people have been infected with HIV/AIDS. In the U.S. AIDS is the leading cause of death between the age of 25 and 44 years old. At the…

Abstract

Within the last two decades over 60 million people have been infected with HIV/AIDS. In the U.S. AIDS is the leading cause of death between the age of 25 and 44 years old. At the end of 2001, the United Nations estimated that 40 million people around the globe live with HIV/AIDS and 5 million people were infected during 2001. AIDS is affecting the global economy equal to the entire economy of Australia or India. The only avoidance of HIV/AIDS impact is prevention. Organizations must take an active role in the education of populations if the impact is to be reduced.

Details

Competitiveness Review: An International Business Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

John Overby, Mike Rayburn, David C. Wyld and Kevin Hammond

Epidemiologists are concerned the next deadly global cognition will be a new kind of deadly flu which humans have no resistance. Since the 1960s, their alarm has been focused on a…

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Abstract

Epidemiologists are concerned the next deadly global cognition will be a new kind of deadly flu which humans have no resistance. Since the 1960s, their alarm has been focused on a bird (avian) virus (H5N1). This virus is generally harmless in its host species, but it is extremely deadly when contracted by humans. H5N1 mutates quickly and tends to pick up genes from flu viruses that affect other species. The flu is far more contagious and harder to contain than the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) virus. It is projected that 30‐40 per cent of the population would be infected in a H5N1 flu pandemic, and as many as one‐third would die. The 1918 Spanish flu caused 20 to 50 million deaths world wide. One scientist observed that the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic could have caused civilisation to disappear within a few weeks. Currently, more than 50 million chickens have been slaughtered in eight Asian countries in efforts to curb the spread of avian influenza. This article examines the roots and dangers of the potential avian influenza pandemic, examining the business and social ramifications that could ensue if the worst case scenario occurs.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

John Overby, Mike Rayburn, Kevin Hammond and David C. Wyld

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and risky…

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Abstract

The war in Iraq, the threat of terrorism and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) epidemic have made international business activities increasingly difficult and risky. The worldwide economic downturn and slow growth in domestic markets are forcing companies to depend more than ever on overseas trade. SARS emerged in China in November 2002 and has spread to 26 countries. The SARS epidemic has caused the most severe economic crisis in Southeast Asia since the wave of bank failures and currency devaluations that swept the region five years ago. The SARS epidemic has prompted health officials to implement travel advisories and restrictions, in order to defer nonessential travel to regions of Asia with large numbers of SARS cases. They are enforcing quarantine and isolation measures in major cities to try and limit the spread of SARS. The President of the United States has signed an executive order adding SARS to the list of communicable diseases that can be quarantined. A major disruption in China could paralyze just‐in‐time supply chains and cause an economic crisis for retailers and other businesses worldwide. The SARS epidemic has caused many economists to drastically reduce their economic‐growth forecasts for Asia. New infectious diseases, such as SARS, can emerge and easily travel around the globe, infecting less‐resilient hosts and mutating because of the influence of viruses and bacteria in their new environment. Health officials are even more concerned about the pandemic disaster that hasn’t happened, but may still. However, the SARS epidemic has created positive economic benefits for some companies.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-727-8

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2022

Philemon Seth Ackom, Kwame Owusu Kwateng, Francis Kamewor Tetteh and Manuel Wiesche

Literature reveals that citizens’ intentions or willingness to adopt and use e-government services in developing countries like Ghana have not been encouraging regardless of the…

Abstract

Purpose

Literature reveals that citizens’ intentions or willingness to adopt and use e-government services in developing countries like Ghana have not been encouraging regardless of the importance of these services. This study aims to examine the factors that inhibit the virtualization of government to citizen e-government processes by assessing citizens’ intentions to resist or use government’s virtualized processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a survey questionnaire to collect data from public school teachers who are users of the Government of Ghana’s e-pay slip system. Out of 500 questionnaires administered, only 423 useable responses were obtained. The data was analyzed with both inferential and descriptive statistics.

Findings

The results of this study showed that process virtualizability significantly predicts virtual process use, and it is associated with user resistance toward virtual process use.

Practical implications

The findings will help governments and managers to comprehend that certain processes are more acquiescent to virtualization than others.

Originality/value

This paper provides researchers with a contemporary perspective toward understanding the adoption and use of e-government services in sub-Saharan Africa through the lens of process virtualization theory.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2023

Soomin Park, Michael J. Braunscheidel and Nallan C. Suresh

The study presents a conceptual model of a firm's supply chain agility (FSCA) as a formative construct formed by sensing and responding capabilities. Both construct validity and…

Abstract

Purpose

The study presents a conceptual model of a firm's supply chain agility (FSCA) as a formative construct formed by sensing and responding capabilities. Both construct validity and predictive validity of the model are tested by investigating nuanced effects of FSCA on business performance. The study aims to empirically validate the sensing-responding theoretical framework of Overby et al. (2006) and extend the emergent stream on sensing-responding frameworks for supply chain agility.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey research is employed. Data are analysed using partial least squares technique and mediation tests by Hayes PROCESS macro.

Findings

FSCA is established as a revised construct formed by the distinct capabilities of sensing and responding. The efficacy of utilizing FSCA as a formative 2nd order construct was established. In addition, FSCA is shown to affect business performance through mediations of cost efficiency and customer effectiveness, establishing its predictive validity.

Originality/value

This study contributes significantly to the literature on supply chain agility in terms of both theory and practice for cultivating supply chain agility. Drawing on resource-based view and resource-advantage theories, as reformulation of supply chain agility as a formative construct of sensing and responding capabilities, this research opens up new lines of inquiry on agility.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Jean Boisvert and Nicholas J. Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the impact of branding strategies on horizontal and downward line extensions of French luxury brands in a cross-national context…

4286

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically assess the impact of branding strategies on horizontal and downward line extensions of French luxury brands in a cross-national context (France vs USA).

Design/methodology/approach

This study is based on a two line extensions (horizontal/downward) × three branding strategies (direct brand/sub-brand/standalone brand) x two country (France/USA) between-subjects ANOVA design.

Findings

The study shows that the subtyping effect created by a sub-branded luxury downward line extension tends to be rated similarly to a direct branded extension which oppose previous beliefs put forward in non-luxury settings. In contrast, a new independent/standalone extension fully uses the subtyping effect which helps attenuate this risk related to luxury downward stretches. The study also found that the effect of gender in cross-national settings must always be taken into consideration as significant variations occur in the process.

Research limitations/implications

The study covers two countries but should be replicated in other cross-national contexts.

Practical implications

This study helps marketing managers of luxury brands make a better decision when it comes to launching vertical line extensions (upscale/downward) by carefully using types of branding strategies and relevant communications whether women and/or men are targeted in cross-national contexts.

Originality/value

This study breaks new ground in the international luxury literature by providing key theoretical and managerial insights in terms of launching new downward line extensions with the proper use of branding strategies when targeting specific genders.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 35 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Book part
Publication date: 24 October 2017

Renee Prunty and Mandy Swartzendruber

There is a perception in the United States that campaign contributions equate with vote buying. Outright vote buying is illegal, but many citizens believe that loopholes in…

Abstract

There is a perception in the United States that campaign contributions equate with vote buying. Outright vote buying is illegal, but many citizens believe that loopholes in campaign contribution laws allow some to buy votes while perpetuating a façade of legitimacy. Both federal and state laws attempt to regulate campaign contributions, but many of those have been limited by the Supreme Court’s ruling that campaign spending is considered free speech (Buckley vs. Valeo, 1976). Without the ability to limit campaign spending, the amount of money it takes to run a campaign, particularly a presidential campaign, has increased substantially. This had led to an increase in the use of bundling by presidential campaigns, with the winners often rewarding their bundlers. It has also led to an increase in outside independent organizations, known as Super PACs, with an unlimited ability to raise and spend money. This creates an additional problem as a small percentage of wealthy individuals constitute the vast majority of campaign contributors, leading to the perception that politicians cater to the elite. Whether a politician is affected by these factors or not is hard to prove, but it still leaves a perception by voters that their votes are less influential than large campaign contributors and there is always a risk that a vote has been bought.

Details

Corruption, Accountability and Discretion
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-556-8

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2020

Byung Joon Choi

Cross-cultural research based on the means-end chain (MEC) theory tends to overestimate the stability of the dominant chains of a cultural group; at the same time, it pays…

Abstract

Purpose

Cross-cultural research based on the means-end chain (MEC) theory tends to overestimate the stability of the dominant chains of a cultural group; at the same time, it pays insufficient attention to the influence of the context on an individual’s cultural anchorage. This study aims to adopt the dynamic constructivist approach to culture to show that, for the same product, differences in MEC for consumers from different cultures can be voluntarily reduced under certain conditions and to a certain extent.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an inter-subject experimental design: two cultures (French vs Korean) × three self-construal primings (independent vs interdependent vs control). Participants in the experimental group were randomly assigned to one of the three priming conditions. The no-priming control group made it possible to verify the effect of priming by measuring the difference in responses with respect to the two experimental groups.

Findings

The results highlight the effect of self-construal priming that contradicts the culture of origin. Cross-cultural independence and interdependence priming foster convergence between dominant chains of French and Korean participants by considerably reducing the cultural differences that are observed when there is no priming. It appears that a consumer’s cultural anchoring can be shaped by priming a specific dimension of self-construal, which, in turn, illustrates that cultural influence is a discontinuous process.

Originality/value

It is the first attempt to study variation in the dominant chains of a cultural group, rather than adopting the preconceived notion of their permanence or stability in different contexts. The methodological contribution is characterized by the combination of a method to record chains and a priming method applied in different cultural environments.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 37 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Book part
Publication date: 3 November 2017

Nancy Laguna Luque, Earl H. Cheek and Evan Ortlieb

To explore middle and high school English Language Learners (ELL) teaching environments from the perspective of multicultural instructors and their understanding of ELL students’…

Abstract

To explore middle and high school English Language Learners (ELL) teaching environments from the perspective of multicultural instructors and their understanding of ELL students’ reality. This qualitative study utilized participant observation and Developmental Research Sequence (Spradley, 1980) as the systematic approach to gather and to analyze data. The study was conducted in an inner city public school district in the south of Louisiana where seven multicultural ELL specialists were located; participants included were originally from the United States, Latvia, the Philippines, Jordan, Romania, and Japan. This study shed light over the fate of most Latina/o teenagers in public middle and high schools, the appropriateness of the state’s response to the literacy and human needs of all students at risk of failure in the middle and high school (Latina/o and African American alike), and the status educators have in the country compared to other highly qualified professionals as perceived by the multicultural educators participating in the study. Several areas of intervention were identified and described including a strong structured program specifically designed for ELLs attending middle and high school; moreover, further research is needed to advance understanding about the relationship among literacy, shame, and students’ behavior.

Details

Addressing Diversity in Literacy Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-048-6

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