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1 – 10 of over 1000
Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Jessica Smith, David John Edwards, Igor Martek, Nicholas Chileshe, Susan Hayhow and Chris J. Roberts

This study aims to excoriate, define and delineate the main drivers of “change” in commercial construction projects and generate guidelines on how to minimise exposure to the…

1231

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to excoriate, define and delineate the main drivers of “change” in commercial construction projects and generate guidelines on how to minimise exposure to the associated adverse effects upon project stakeholders.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopts mixed doctrines through a combination of epistemological lenses, embracing two primary philosophical stances: interpretivism, to identify the primary drivers of change based on a systematic literature review and a post-positivist, inductive approach to analyse the results of change within a Joint Contracts Tribunal (JCT) Design and Build (D&B) construction project case study.

Findings

The causal nexus of change during the construction phase is assessed and delineated; the key affecting factors are thematically grouped under headings: extent and severity; time in relation to implementing; instigating party; individual(s) responsible for managing the change; reason for the change; available resource; recoverable or non-recoverable; contract/project type; and type of client. Following this, the effects of change on key elements of the project are encapsulated and recommendations for adaptations which may provide improved experiences are offered.

Originality/value

The study tackles the common issue of managing the deleterious effects of change on commercial construction projects, defining management techniques to minimise stakeholder tribulation.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2016

Christy Smith and Jessica Terman

Scholars and practitioners have come to understand the important role of local governments in the causes and effects of climate change. The literature has examined both the…

Abstract

Scholars and practitioners have come to understand the important role of local governments in the causes and effects of climate change. The literature has examined both the substantive and symbolic determinants of urban sustainability policies in addition to the implementation issues associated with those policies. At the heart of these policies is the idea that local governments have the desire and ability to engage in socially and environmentally responsible practices to mitigate climate change. While important, these studies are missing a key component in the investigation of local government involvement in sustainability policies: government purchasing power. This study examines the effect of administrative professionalism and interest group presence on the determinants of green procurement in the understudied context of counties in the United States.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 16 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2016

E. Christine Baker-Smith and Jessica Lipschultz

Concern about the use of zero-tolerance policies for discipline has led to a search for alternatives such as training in early-warning signs of aggressive behavior and strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

Concern about the use of zero-tolerance policies for discipline has led to a search for alternatives such as training in early-warning signs of aggressive behavior and strategies for effective classroom management in schools. This chapter examines the effectiveness of the provision of alternatives to out-of-school suspensions (OSS) in reducing the use of exclusionary discipline for minor misbehavior and the school characteristics associated with these provisions.

Design/methodology/approach

This analysis uses the 2008 panel from the National School Survey on Crime and Safety to explore this question for approximately 1,000 high schools. The analysis is a probit regression analysis to examine the association between the provision of alternatives to OSS, school characteristics, and the use of OSS for low-level suspensions. This analytic approach provides wide generalizability for the findings, though it does also limit an ability to identify individual school- or student-level effects.

Findings

Findings based on probit regression analysis suggest that structural characteristics of schools – beyond student characteristics – are only somewhat related to variation in the use of OSS for low-level infractions and, on average, the availability of alternatives to OSS do not strongly decrease the frequency of OSS for lower-level infractions. These findings are important in the current era of discipline policy scrutiny where schools and policy-makers are searching for alternatives to traditional suspension practices in a limited empirical evidence base.

Originality/value

While these alternatives hold great promise, little is known about their effectiveness in addressing behavior problems and/or reducing OSS. More importantly, even less is known about the characteristics of schools likely to enact alternatives.

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Andrew Clark and Jessica Smith

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project investigating people’s experiences of domestic fires in a Northern UK city region. Although there is much research…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on a research project investigating people’s experiences of domestic fires in a Northern UK city region. Although there is much research exploring behaviours during fire incidents and identifying who, where and (to a lesser extent) why, fires occur, there is little understanding of people’s experiences of domestic fires. This includes how individuals come to reflect on and understand the incident; how they articulate how events unfolded leading up to, during and immediately post incident; and how experiencing an incident may influence an individual’s perception of fire risk or the possibility of him or her experiencing a further fire. This paper contributes to this understanding by providing an overview of key findings from a recent empirical research project.

Design/methodology/approach

A participative, qualitative research design was developed in which Community Safety Advisors (CSAs) were trained in data collection and analysis techniques. CSAs undertook interviews with 72 individuals who had experienced a non-fatal domestic fire incident between 2012 and 2013. The interviews were transcribed and analysed by the authors in consultation with CSAs through a series of “action research” and “participative data analysis” workshops and events.

Findings

The authors report on key findings from the study with respect to how people recollect the fire incident; their understanding of why it occurred and what could have been done to prevent it; and their reflections on how the incident may (or may not) have influenced their current views on fire and fire risk.

Research limitations/implications

The research has a number of implications for research and policy. This includes greater understanding for the role of narrative data in understanding fire incidents and post incident reflections, as well as recognising the potential for fire and rescue services to widen their research and analysis agendas. Analysis also identifies the importance of clear communication in prevention strategies, including with respect to communicating the causes of fire and the “get out-stay out” message.

Originality/value

The authors believe the research project to be one of the first, internationally, to record qualitative experiences of domestic fires and situate these experiences within a broader framework of fire risk. In presenting an overview of the findings here, the intention is to promote our learning to other researchers and practitioners in the fire-risk sector and beyond.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Henk Huijser, Megan Y. C. A. Kek and Ruth Terwijn

This chapter provides an outline of how the essential elements of problem-based learning (PBL) can be adapted to enhance inquiry-based learning environments and in the process…

Abstract

This chapter provides an outline of how the essential elements of problem-based learning (PBL) can be adapted to enhance inquiry-based learning environments and in the process teach 21st century skills. It uses a case study of a first-year nursing course at a regional Australian university to show how essential PBL elements can be adapted in an ‘ePBL’ context, following five ePBL steps. Overall, it is argued that a carefully mapped outset of learning outcomes and PBL problems designed as inquiry-based activities provide a ‘liquid learning’ environment that will ultimately prepare confident graduates who will be able to take full advantage of the 21st century learning and professional contexts in which they find themselves.

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (Stem) Programs: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-850-2

Abstract

Details

Breaking the Zero-Sum Game
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-186-7

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 June 2014

Michele M. Laliberte, Daniel Balk, Stacey Tweed, Jessica Smith and Amrita Ghai

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether reading a self-help chapter on the body's regulation of weight can change weight control beliefs, and whether such changes in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether reading a self-help chapter on the body's regulation of weight can change weight control beliefs, and whether such changes in turn predict improvements in body dissatisfaction and self-esteem.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants of a mixed racial sample of undergraduate college women (n=154) completed measures of personal weight control beliefs, body dissatisfaction, self-esteem and knowledge before and after they read a self-help education chapter.

Findings

Exposure to the education was associated with improvement in knowledge, body dissatisfaction and self-esteem and change in weight control beliefs. Increase in the belief in “striving for a healthy lifestyle with acceptance of one's natural weight” predicted improvement in body dissatisfaction and self-esteem.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides preliminary evidence that realistic information about weight control can impact weight control beliefs, and that this in turn is associated with improvement in body satisfaction and self-esteem. The major limitation of the study is the lack of control group to ensure changes are not due to factors like social desirability. Future directions would be to replicate this research using a control group, and to look at the role of education and weight control beliefs in eating disordered and bariatric populations.

Originality/value

This is the first study to look at the impact of providing young women with realistic information about the body's regulation of weight and weight loss outcomes on their beliefs about weight control, body dissatisfaction and self-esteem. This information is valuable for health care providers and educators working with young women.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

María Fernanda Wagstaff, Adrienne Collela, María del Carmen Triana, Alexis Nicole Smith and Marla Baskerville Watkins

Drawing from social dominance theories and conceptualizations of paternalism, the purpose of this paper is to define and develop a measure of subordinates’ perceptions of…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing from social dominance theories and conceptualizations of paternalism, the purpose of this paper is to define and develop a measure of subordinates’ perceptions of supervisor paternalism (SPSP).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors assess the validity of the measure using Hinkin’s (1998) scale development steps.

Findings

The authors found evidence of the convergent and discriminant validity of the measure of subordinates’ perceptions of supervisor paternalism drawing from three different samples. Participants in the study were also able to differentiate a low from a high paternalism condition using the measure of paternalism. Finally, as expected, the interaction between a supervisor’s benevolence and control was significantly associated with subordinates’ perceptions of supervisor paternalism.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide evidence for the validity of a measure of subordinates’ perceptions of supervisor paternalism while controlling for various status signals represented by demographic variables. Results may have been influenced by common method variance. However, there is no theoretical reason to expect any such interactions. Additionally, as the authors limited the data collection to the USA, the authors caution against generalizing beyond that context.

Practical implications

The authors provide validity and reliability evidence for a unidimensional measure that is short and easy to administer in future research to further examine the consequences of perceptions of supervisor paternalism.

Social implications

Defining and measuring subordinates’ perceptions of supervisor paternalism is important to society given the potential adverse consequences of these perceptions. Because paternalistic relationships pervade many supervisor-subordinate interactions, both subordinates and supervisors can become more sensitive to the consequences of such interactions by understanding the conditions under which supervisor paternalism manifests itself.

Originality/value

Conceptually, in this study, the authors build on prior research and define supervisor paternalism from a social dominance perspective. Empirically, the authors contribute a statistically valid and reliable unidimensional measure.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 21 March 2023

Michelle Carr

There are substantive gaps in the literature in relation to older women in prison This chapter will utilise the risk, need and responsivity framework to develop a more…

Abstract

There are substantive gaps in the literature in relation to older women in prison This chapter will utilise the risk, need and responsivity framework to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the characteristics attributable to this small but significant group. To date most research into the experiences of older women in prison consist of relatively small-scale qualitative research. Wahidin (2004) argues that this group may have been overlooked and broadly neglected because of a latent form of ageism which has served to permit organisational oversight (p. 10). While others reflect on the difficulties posed by such small numbers and subsequent lack of statistical power resulting in a dearth of research (Omolade, 2014).

Britton and Jensen (2003, p. 2) emphasised a well-documented dichotomy when they stated that a ‘women’s violence stands in stark contradiction to prevailing norms around (white) femininity’. For older women, a crude lack of intersectionality and denial of reality is combined with the systemic male bias of the criminal justice system (Kerr & Shackel, 2018), limited acknowledgement of variability (Chrisler & Palatino, 2016) and how these factors are considered in terms of risk, need and responsivity (Wilson-Smith & Carr, 2017).

This chapter will utilise these considerations as a foundation together with theoretical underpinnings of development, socialisation and incarceration, in order to further develop knowledge while emphasising the hidden challenges of older women in prison and identifying areas requiring urgent development.

Details

Not Your Usual Suspect: Older Offenders of Violence and Abuse
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-887-6

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2018

Jewell Winn, Kisha C. Bryan and Andrea L. Tyler

Since the mid-1800s, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been educating a majority of Black Americans. These 105 institutions serve more than 300,000…

Abstract

Since the mid-1800s, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) have been educating a majority of Black Americans. These 105 institutions serve more than 300,000 undergraduate, graduate, and professional students from diverse backgrounds, various socio economic levels, and academic achievement levels. And, it is important that they continue on this challenging journey of addressing the unique needs of the HBCU student by becoming more efficient and focused on their program offerings with minimal state support and shrinking federal funding. Further, systems mandates, board governance, affirmative action, and civil unrest oftentimes camouflage the historic role of the HBCU. Questions arise as to the relevance of these historic institutions when the student, faculty, and staff demographics begin to shift in an effort to compete for the quality and quantity of students enrolling at majority institutions. It is imperative that we continue having crucial conversations surrounding the essence of this challenge. Diversity is our strength and a reality that should not be ignored. What better institution to exemplify inclusive excellence than a HBCU? This chapter will address how these historic institutions can continue to celebrate their legacy while embracing the rich dimensions of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Details

Underserved Populations at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-841-1

Keywords

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