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Book part
Publication date: 26 September 2006

Patricia Tuitt

The political landscape that has been unfolding since the attacks on the World Trade Centre in September 2001 has created an urgent imperative for a reappraisal of the…

Abstract

The political landscape that has been unfolding since the attacks on the World Trade Centre in September 2001 has created an urgent imperative for a reappraisal of the place of individual force within philosophies of violence, particularly those that are directed to law. An extensive critique of the relation between law and violence has emerged around the works of philosophers, such as Walter Benjamin, Franz Fanon, Jacques Derrida and Giorgio Agamben (1998, In: D.H. Roazen (Trans.), Homo sacer: Sovereign power and bare life. California: Stanford University Press), but it is questionable whether any of these provide us with the conceptual tools with which to address what is being presented (correctly or otherwise) as a particular problematic of the 21st century. Indeed, I would argue that a certain intellectual malaise surrounds discussion around individual force and that this state of affairs is in large measure due to the way in which critical theory and philosophy has addressed questions concerning the relation between individual violence and the juridical order. Without exception such accounts declare that individual violence undermines the authority of law itself. The following seeks to interrogate this contention and in doing so to begin to construct a more nuanced way of conceiving how the law preserves its authority.

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Studies in Law, Politics and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-323-5

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2015

Olufemi Adeniyi Fawole and Ebenezer Bayode Agboola

Dating violence has, in recent times, been a social problem that has been creating different levels of concern especially among parents, and those in the academia, in…

Abstract

Purpose

Dating violence has, in recent times, been a social problem that has been creating different levels of concern especially among parents, and those in the academia, in Nigeria. Studies have shown causes to be largely due to personality types, but little relate it with violence between the parents of the perpetrator. This study examines the influence of violence between parents and the effect on dating violence among students in Nigerian Universities.

Design/Methodology/Approach

Questionnaires were administered to 460 students who had experienced violence in their dating relationship. The study had 55.7% of the respondents being females.

Findings

All of the respondents had experienced dating violence at one point or the other in their relationship. About 36.7% of the respondents reported to having been in dating relationship with a partner who had witnessed violence in the home. Data analyzed using Pearson Product Moment Correlation Co-efficient indicate that the variables of parental conflict and dating violence were significantly positively correlated among the students.

Originality/Value

The study was limited because it focuses on only one university, and research in the area of dating violence in Nigeria has not been extensively reported. The study therefore emphasizes the impact of socialization process on dating behavior of young adults in Nigeria as well as the need to have further studies on these dating patterns. This study will serve as addition to the gradually increasing literature on dating behavior of young adults in the Nigerian society.

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Violence and Crime in the Family: Patterns, Causes, and Consequences
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-262-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Jill Radford

Effective professional approaches to the issue of domestic violence are in danger of being undermined by a lack of clarity in definition. This article argues that the…

Abstract

Effective professional approaches to the issue of domestic violence are in danger of being undermined by a lack of clarity in definition. This article argues that the gender neutral specification of domestic violence, the breadth of circumstances that comprise it and the encouragement of local variations allow a shift of focus away from the real problem of violence by males upon females and coherent crime reduction strategies.

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Jackie Barron

This paper is based on a survey of service provision for women experiencing domestic violence and who have additional complex mental health or substance use needs. Postal…

Abstract

This paper is based on a survey of service provision for women experiencing domestic violence and who have additional complex mental health or substance use needs. Postal questionnaires were sent to domestic violence organisations, community mental health teams, mental health NHS trusts and substance use services. The views of women survivors of domestic violence were also sought. The survey, undertaken by Women's Aid, identifies some shortcomings in existing provision and makes recommendations for future development of services. More refuge provision is needed which can accommodate women with mental health and substance use needs, and their children.Mental health professionals and those working in drug and alcohol services also need training in domestic violence, to enable them to respond more appropriately to the needs of abused women and to work effectively in partnership with refuge organisations.

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Housing, Care and Support, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-8790

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Heather Barclay and Diane Mulligan

Efforts at tackling different forms of targeted violence may benefit from lessons generated from the longer‐standing work in tackling violence against women. These include…

Abstract

Efforts at tackling different forms of targeted violence may benefit from lessons generated from the longer‐standing work in tackling violence against women. These include the conceptualisation and articulation of targeted violence as a cause and consequence of inequality, and as a human rights issue. There is a need to develop effective coalitions and to make explicit the relevance and implications of targeted violence across all public services so that those affected receive the support they require. The importance of education and prevention is also highlighted. While such lessons can help reframe the issues and policies around targeted violence, they should not be transposed uncritically.

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Safer Communities, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Jill Hoxmeier, Juliana Carlson, Erin Casey and Claire Willey-Sthapit

The purpose of this study is to examine men’s engagement in anti-sexual violence activism, including the frequency of their participation, whether demographic correlates…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine men’s engagement in anti-sexual violence activism, including the frequency of their participation, whether demographic correlates, as well as a history of sexual harassment perpetration, relate to frequency, and the extent to which those correlates explain variation in frequency.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for this cross-sectional study were collected in 2020; participants were 474 men, 18–40 years of age, who live in the USA.

Findings

Descriptive findings show that in the past year, about two-thirds of the men engaged in at least one of the behaviors related to anti-violence activism examined here but with relatively low frequency. Hierarchical regression modeling showed that several of men’s demographic characteristics were significantly related to an increase in frequency, including sexual minoritized identity, education, mother’s education and being a father/parent, as well as past year sexual harassment perpetration in a fourth model. Overall, these variables explained approximately 22% of the variance in frequency of activism.

Research limitations/implications

The sample is not representative of the US population. There is potential for the frequency of activism and engagement to be explained by individuals’ access to opportunities for activism.

Practical implications

This paper discusses implications for practitioners who want to engage men in anti-violence activism.

Social implications

Engaging men in anti-violence activism is critical to end sexual violence.

Originality/value

This study responds to the call for investigations of bystander intervention to include pro-active helping, outside of intervention in high-risk situations for violence and to examine such beyond college students.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 27 August 2021

Durmus Alper Camlibel and Salih Hakan Can

The purpose of this study was to expand available knowledge on predictors of male inmate violence by examining a large set of variables offered by the importation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to expand available knowledge on predictors of male inmate violence by examining a large set of variables offered by the importation, deprivation and threat appraisal and coping theories.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 465 male inmates from five medium-security prisons in Wisconsin completed surveys to report demographics, violence, personality, social stressors and healthy coping behaviors to help manage risk by identifying key factors.

Findings

Inmates reported more violence with the “imported” characteristics of younger age, less incarceration, no college experience and personality patterns of impulsiveness, hostility and internal locus of control. More violence was reported by inmates with social stressors experienced from family and correctional staff. Additionally, less violence was reported by inmates with more healthy coping behaviors of exercise and social support, especially from family and other inmates.

Research limitations/implications

One must remain uncertain about whether similar patterns of demographics, personality, social stressors and coping behaviors associated with inmate violence would be found in other US prisons. Future research can determine whether similar predictors of violence are found for women inmates and the consideration of ethnicity should be warranted when examining predictors of inmate violence.

Practical implications

Prison administrators can develop new programs to reduce social stressors and increase healthy coping behaviors found by this study to be significantly associated with reduced violence, exercise and social support from other inmates and family.

Social implications

This research recommends that educating and training correctional staff for a trauma-informed care approach is an integral part of lessening the effects of “pains of imprisonment” on inmate violence and healing the effects of trauma.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study provides the first direct comparison of social stressors from other inmates, correctional staff or family members outside the prison as possible predictors of male inmate violence.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article
Publication date: 24 June 2021

Elke Van Hellemont and James Densley

In their 1999 classic, Crime is Not the Problem, Zimring and Hawkins changed the way criminologists thought about crime and violence simply by forcing us to distinguish…

Abstract

Purpose

In their 1999 classic, Crime is Not the Problem, Zimring and Hawkins changed the way criminologists thought about crime and violence simply by forcing us to distinguish between them. In so doing, they advanced an agenda for a more effective response to the real “crime” problem in America – violence. In this short commentary, the authors apply this logic to gang research and responses. The authors argue police fall short in responding to “gangs” because researchers and policymakers have defined them in terms of criminal behaviour writ large, not the problem that really needs policing – the precise social and spatial dynamics of gang violence. The purpose of this paper is to stand on the shoulders of others who have stated violence trumps gangs when it comes to policy and practice and provide a conceptual review of the literature that captures mainstream and critical perspectives on gangs and offers both sides some common ground to start from as they contemplate “policing” gangs with or without police.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the extant literature.

Findings

The authors stand on the shoulders of others who have stated violence trumps gangs when it comes to policy and practice, to provide a conceptual review of the literature that captures mainstream and critical perspectives on gangs, in North American and European contexts, and offers both sides some common ground to start from as they contemplate “policing” gangs with or without police.

Originality/value

The paper is a conceptual piece looking at policing gang violence versus gang crime. The paper aims to restart the debate around the role of crime in gangs and gangs in crime. This debate centres around whether gangs should be understood as primarily criminal groups, whether “the gang” is to blame for the crime and violence of its members and what feature of collective crime and violence designate “gangness”. We use that debate to reflect past and current police practices towards gangs.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 13 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Abstract

Details

Sexual Violence on Campus
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-229-1

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Book part
Publication date: 19 September 2006

Katalin Fábián

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists paid special attention to domestic…

Abstract

The international women's movement has always focused on discrimination against women, but only in the past few decades have activists paid special attention to domestic violence. In post-communist Europe, it took even longer but the Polish, Czech, Slovak, Hungarian, and Slovene governments eventually reacted to domestic and global pressure and established new definitions and norms dealing with domestic violence. Analyzing the process of norm development on domestic violence in Central Europe can direct us toward determining to what extent political and economic processes and decisions in Europe are driving globalization, or are being driven by globalization.

Details

European Responses to Globalization
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-364-8

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