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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2010

Morten Hesse

Assessment of personality disorders in substance abusing patients may produce important insights. Little is known about the value of routine personality disorder…

Abstract

Assessment of personality disorders in substance abusing patients may produce important insights. Little is known about the value of routine personality disorder assessment in a clinical context. Adults with past‐year substance dependence seeking treatment at a centralised intake unit for substance abusers in the City of Copenhagen were randomised to assessment of personality disorders and individual psychoeducation vs. attention placebo (n=75). All patients received psychoeducation for attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and anxiety/depression when indicated. Patients were followed at three and six months post‐treatment. The psychoeducation for personality disorder did not result in improved functioning. Significant differences indicated a larger drop in substance use in the experimental group. Assessing personality disorders and providing psychoeducation is a promising treatment in a clinical context. There is a need for relevant treatment options to improve functioning and quality of life for this group of patients.

Details

Drugs and Alcohol Today, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1745-9265

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Article
Publication date: 15 March 2019

John Chiocchi, Gary Lamph, Paula Slevin, Debra Fisher-Smith and Mark Sampson

Carers of people with mental health problems present with high levels of burden, poor mental well-being and feelings of disempowerment by mental health services. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Carers of people with mental health problems present with high levels of burden, poor mental well-being and feelings of disempowerment by mental health services. The purpose of this paper is to establish whether providing a psychoeducation skill programme for carers would lead to an improvement of mental well-being, reduce the levels of burden that carers sometimes feel while caring for someone with mental illness and also to increase empowerment. This paper provides a service evaluation study of an innovative carer-led psychoeducational intervention that was undertaken.

Design/methodology/approach

This programme was initiated and led by a carer who had experienced a lack of service provision to support carers and families in understanding and caring for a relative with severe and enduring mental health diagnoses. A model of co-production was adopted with the carer who led this initiative working closely with an occupational therapist and consultant psychologist in its development and delivery. Data were collected to measure the impact of the training at five different time points. The measures employed to measure outcomes were the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale, the Burden Assessment Scale and Family Empowerment Scale.

Findings

Results indicated improved well-being, reduced burden and increased family empowerment in carers who completed this peer-led carer initiative psychoeducational programme.

Research limitations/implications

This service evaluation study was conducted in a single site and in the site in which it was developed. The carer consultant who led this evaluation and development of the intervention was also the peer worker who delivered the interventions. Hence, the authors are unable to ascertain if the results reported are unique to the individual peer worker. The transferability of this programme and generalisability of the result should therefore be treated with caution and further replication of this model and research is required. This would be beneficial to be conducted in an alternative site from where it was developed, delivered by different facilitators and include a control group.

Practical implications

The evidence from this study indicates that carers are able and willing to attend a group psychoeducational programme. A high number of referrals to the programme in a relatively short timeframe indicates that there is significant demand for such a service. The implementation of the programme is relatively straightforward. The key challenges for practical implementation are to have the right carer to lead and deliver the programme and the right support system in place for them (financial and supervision). Co-production also is not without challenges, the peer worker and occupational staff need to ensure that mutually valued and respected working relationship should develop.

Originality/value

This is the first evaluation of the impact of a carer-led psychoeducation intervention for carers of people with mental health difficulties in secondary mental health services.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Fiammetta Rocca, Chloe Finamore, Sally Stamp, Fiona Kuhn-Thompson and Oliver Dale

National Institute for Clinical and Health Excellence guidelines (2009) state that low intensity psychological interventions should not be used for borderline personality…

Abstract

Purpose

National Institute for Clinical and Health Excellence guidelines (2009) state that low intensity psychological interventions should not be used for borderline personality disorder. However, an emerging body of evidence suggests brief interventions such as psychoeducation may be relevant for those presenting with borderline personality difficulties. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the benefit of learning about thinking, emotions and relationships (LATER), a co-produced psychoeducation programme for borderline personality difficulties in a community-based setting.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants (n = 125) self-referred to LATER, a group-based psychoeducation programme delivered at the [NHS Trust] Recovery College. Participants were assessed pre- and post-intervention using the tailor-made psychological education group evaluation scale, the borderline evaluation of severity over time and work and social adjustment scale. Paired t-tests were conducted on pre- and post-scores, and effect sizes were calculated.

Findings

After LATER, participants reported a significant decrease in negative thoughts and feelings, destructive behaviours and overall borderline symptom severity, but no significant increase in positive behaviours. Significant decreases were found in areas of work and social impairment. Participants’ overall understanding of personality difficulties significantly improved. Effect sizes were small to moderate.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study include the lack of a control group, adjustment for confounders and follow-up. Replication with a more robust methodology is needed.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the evidence for the usefulness of brief interventions for personality difficulties, particularly in the context of a stepped model of care and adds to the research on co-production.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Sarah Ashworth, Krista Jansen, Lydia Bullock and Paul Mooney

The purpose of this paper is to describe a feasibility study into the development and pilot of a psychoeducational group for people with intellectual disability and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a feasibility study into the development and pilot of a psychoeducational group for people with intellectual disability and co-morbid mental disorder (including mental illness and personality disorder) within forensic settings.

Design/methodology/approach

“Mind Matters”, a psychoeducational programme for people with an intellectual disability and co-morbid mental disorders is a group based programme in a medium secure hospital, adapted and developed to be suitable for people with intellectual disability therapist multidisciplinary approach was key to its development. An open group on a 16-bedded ward for individuals with mild to moderate intellectual disability and co-morbid mental illness was delivered over a six-week period.

Findings

The group was positively received in pilot by participants and members of the clinical teams. Attendance and engagement of participants were key measures of the success of the programme. In addition to the apparent increased social skills and motivation to engage with future psychological intervention.

Practical implications

The authors believe that this approach benefitted both the group members and staff on ward, reinforcing strategies for maintaining positive mental health. It also stimulated engagement, discussion about mental disorders including mental illness, personality disorder and intellectual disabilities.

Originality/value

This paper shows how a psychoeducational approach to mental disorder and mental health in individuals with an intellectual disability is possible, beneficial and well received.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8824

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Ian Barron and David Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to assess unit manager perspectives on the introduction of a group-based trauma-specific programme delivered across Scotland’s secure estate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess unit manager perspectives on the introduction of a group-based trauma-specific programme delivered across Scotland’s secure estate. As this was the first time such an estate-wide initiative had occurred, it was important to identify the benefits/challenges at a strategic level.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory qualitative case study was utilised involving semi-structured interviews with five senior unit managers in three secure units to discover their perceptions of the benefits and challenges of implementing Teaching Recovery Techniques (TRT). A quasi-qualitative analysis was used to quantify and give meaning to manager responses. Inter-rater reliability of analysis was assessed.

Findings

Unit managers perceived gains in trauma-informed knowledge for themselves, and knowledge and skills gains for programme workers, care staff and adolescents. Challenges involved: managing a shift in paradigm to include a trauma-specific programme; the limiting context of competitive tendering; short duration placements; and the need for psychoeducation for staff, parents and agencies.

Research limitations/implications

Large sample sizes are likely to identify further issues for unit managers. Manager perceptions need directly compared with staff and adolescent perceptions and included in randomised control trials of trauma-specific programmes.

Practical implications

Managers perceived that TRT needed to be delivered within trauma-informed organisations and identified the need for manager training in traumatisation, trauma recovery and organisational implications to guide strategic planning. Managers emphasised the need for psychoeducation for families, staff and agencies.

Originality/value

The current study is the first in Scotland to explore unit manager experience of introducing a trauma-specific programme across the secure estate.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2020

Alyson Gamble

For decades, artificial intelligence (AI) has been utilized within the field of mental healthcare. This paper aims to examine AI chatbots, specifically as offered through…

Abstract

Purpose

For decades, artificial intelligence (AI) has been utilized within the field of mental healthcare. This paper aims to examine AI chatbots, specifically as offered through mobile applications for mental healthcare (MHapps), with attention to the social implications of these technologies. For example, AI chatbots in MHapps are programmed with therapeutic techniques to assist people with anxiety and depression, but the promise of this technology is tempered by concerns about the apps' efficacy, privacy, safety and security.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilizing a social informatics perspective, a literature review covering MHapps, with a focus on AI chatbots was conducted from the period of January–April 2019. A borrowed theory approach pairing information science and social work was applied to analyze the literature.

Findings

Rising needs for mental healthcare, combined with expanding technological developments, indicate continued growth of MHapps and chatbots. While an AI chatbot may provide a person with a place to access tools and a forum to discuss issues, as well as a way to track moods and increase mental health literacy, AI is not a replacement for a therapist or other mental health clinician. Ultimately, if AI chatbots and other MHapps are to have a positive impact, they must be regulated, and society must avoid techno-fundamentalism in relation to AI for mental health.

Originality/value

This study adds to a small but growing body of information science research into the role of AI in the support of mental health.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 72 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Hugh Worrall, Richard Schweizer, Ellen Marks, Lin Yuan, Chris Lloyd and Rob Ramjan

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and…

Abstract

Purpose

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and the evidence for the effectiveness of mental health support groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a systematic literature review of relevant databases around support groups for mental health. Support groups are defined as meetings of people with similar experiences, such as those defined as carers of a person living with a mental illness or a person living with a mental illness. These meetings aim to provide support and companionship to one another.

Findings

The results show that there is a consistent pattern of evidence, over a long period of time, which confirms the effectiveness of mental health support groups for carers and people living with mental illness. There is strong, scientifically rigorous evidence which shows the effectiveness of professionally facilitated, family-led support groups, psychoeducation carers support groups, and professionally facilitated, program-based support groups for people living with mental illness.

Research limitations/implications

This research implies the use of support groups is an important adjunct to the support of carers and people with mental illness, including severe mental illness.

Originality/value

This research brings together a range of studies indicating the usefulness of support groups as an adjunct to mental health therapy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Tiraya Lerthattasilp, Lampu Kosulwit, Muthita Phanasathit, Winitra Nuallaong, Pairath Tapanadechopone, Chommakorn Thanetnit and Thammanard Charernboon

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an online psychological support group on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a Thai field hospital.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an online psychological support group on patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in a Thai field hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A prospective controlled trial was conducted at a Thai field hospital and included patients with confirmed COVID-19 who were over the age of 18 and able to use an online communication application. Patients were free to decide whether to participate in the online group. The group provided a space for participants to communicate with each other and a mental health service team. The everyday activities were designed to enable group support via texting or livestreaming through the LINE application. Psychoeducation via video clips or articles regarding stress management were provided. Outcomes were measured by an online self-reported questionnaire based on the twenty-one-item Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) on the first and fourteenth day of admission to the field hospital.

Findings

Forty-six patients participated in this study. Forty participants completed the secondary assessment, with 21 in the intervention group and 19 in the control group. From multilevel mixed-effects regression analysis, adjusted for gender, age and education, participation in the intervention group significantly decreased total DASS scores and anxiety subdomain scores compared to those in the control group (p = 0.038 and 0.008).

Originality/value

The online psychological support group offered benefits for patients with COVID-19 who were isolated in the field hospital. It could be an effective alternative measure to distribute psychological care during a pandemic situation. However, a small sample size was a limitation of this study.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2020

Padraig Cotter, Nicola Jhumat, Eshia Garcha, Eirini Papasileka, Jennifer Parker, Ishmael Mupfupi and Ian Currie

This paper aims to outline the process of supporting frontline inpatient mental health staff in developing ways of coping with COVID-19.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the process of supporting frontline inpatient mental health staff in developing ways of coping with COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

A whole system approach was used in formulating and developing support structures with particular focus on relationship-focused coping.

Findings

Interventions were developed to support staff in coping with problem-focused (e.g. systemic changes) and emotion-focused challenges (e.g. deaths of colleagues). These included psychoeducation, mindfulness-based meditation and rituals to mark the deaths of colleagues. Staff SPACE (Stopping to Process and Consider Events) sessions were used to support staff in managing the many emotions they were experiencing. Positive psychology-based interventions were used to keep morale up and help people to stay motivated. The process of seeking feedback and making changes was introduced to support staff in feeling heard and having a voice. The maternal or master intervention within each of the above was the relational component.

Practical implications

This work aimed to boost the emotional and psychological literacy of the system. This will be important in the aftermath of the pandemic and could have many benefits thereafter.

Social implications

The post-COVID-19 health-care workforce will experience significant challenges in terms of readjustment and recovery. It is important that appropriate measures are put in place to ameliorate this.

Originality/value

An innovative systemic formulation of the impact of COVID-19 on frontline staff, and a coordinated way of dealing with this, is outlined.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Kuldip Kaur Kang and Nicola Moran

This paper aims to explore inpatient staff experiences of seeking to meet the religious and cultural needs of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) inpatients on mental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore inpatient staff experiences of seeking to meet the religious and cultural needs of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) inpatients on mental health wards.

Design/methodology/approach

Nine semi-structured interviews were undertaken with inpatient staff in one NHS Trust in England to explore their views and experiences of supporting BAME inpatients to meet their religious and cultural needs. Anonymised transcripts were analysed thematically.

Findings

Inpatient staff reported lacking the confidence and knowledge to identify and meet BAME inpatients’ religious and cultural needs, especially inpatients from smaller ethnic groups and newly emerging communities. There was no specific assessment used to identify religious and cultural needs and not all inpatient staff received training on meeting these needs. Concerns were raised about difficulties for staff in differentiating whether unusual beliefs and practices were expressions of religiosity or delusions. Staff identified the potential role of inpatients’ family members in identifying and meeting needs, explaining religious and cultural beliefs and practices, and psychoeducation to encourage treatment or medication adherence.

Practical implications

Potential ways to address this gap in the knowledge and confidence of inpatient staff to meet the religious and cultural needs of BAME patients include training for inpatient staff; the production and updating of a directory of common religious and cultural practices and needs; local resources which can help to support those needs; and religious and cultural practices and needs being documented by mental health practitioners in community teams such that this information is readily available for inpatient staff if a service user is admitted.

Originality/value

This is the first study to consider inpatient staff views on meeting the religious and cultural needs of BAME informal patients and patients detained under the Mental Health Act 1983.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

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