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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2013

Sheau‐yueh J. Chao

The purpose of this paper is to provide the historical background of genealogical records and analyze the value of Chinese genealogical research through the study of names

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide the historical background of genealogical records and analyze the value of Chinese genealogical research through the study of names and genealogical resources.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the historical evolution and value of Chinese genealogical records, with the focus on researching the Islamic Chinese names used by the people living in Guilin. The highlight of this paper includes the analysis and evolution of the Islamic Chinese names commonly adopted by the local people in Guilin. It concludes with the recommendations on emphasizing and making the best use of genealogical records to enhance the research value of Chinese overseas studies.

Findings

The paper covers the history of Islam and describes how the religion was introduced into China, as well as Muslims' ethnicity and identity. It also places focus on the importance of building a research collection in Asian history and Chinese genealogy.

Research limitations/implications

This research study has a strong subject focus on Chinese genealogy, Asian history, and Islamic Chinese surnames. It is a narrow field that few researchers have delved into.

Practical implications

The results of this study will assist students, researchers, and the general public in tracing the origin of their surnames and developing their interest in the social and historical value of Chinese local history and genealogies.

Social implications

The study of Chinese surnames is, by itself, a particular field for researching the social and political implications of contemporary Chinese society during the time the family members lived.

Originality/value

Very little research has been done in the area of Chinese local history and genealogy. The paper would be of value to researchers such as historians, sociologists, ethnologists and archaeologists, as well as students and anyone interested in researching a surname origin, its history and evolution.

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Rosa E. Rios, Hernan E. Riquelme and Yasser Abdelaziz

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers perceive the trustworthiness of halal certifications from various Muslim and non-Muslim countries, a topic highly…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how consumers perceive the trustworthiness of halal certifications from various Muslim and non-Muslim countries, a topic highly disregarded despite the size of the market and the importance in penetrating the multibillion market.

Design/methodology/approach

A customized factorial design was employed to measure main effects of brand familiarity, country trustworthiness and country favourability and interaction effects.

Findings

Although Indonesia and Malaysia are Muslim countries, they are not perceived as trustworthy as others such as Saudi Arabia and Kuwait for the consumer product under study. The perception of trustworthiness of halal certification of origin explains the highest proportion of the variance in the preference for a product, followed by the interaction of country favourability and brand name country of origin (COO).

Research limitations/implications

Managers of international companies should be aware that not all halal country certifications are equally perceived as trustworthy therefore, they should seek alliances, with institutions in markets where they seek to penetrate.

Practical implications

The procedure for certification considers the whole value chain rather than just simple ritual of slaughtering. Managers have a big responsibility to produce their products according to the expected standards (and this goes beyond the simple slaughtering ritual) and make sure that all employees understands the importance of such adherence.

Social implications

Muslim consumers’ preferences vary according to the COO of halal products, even within Muslim countries therefore, halal certification country-of-origin is a sensitive social concern.

Originality/value

This research is based on COO and brand familiarity frameworks, and it extends the knowledge in a context (halal products) not frequently explored.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Nur Hanani Hussin and Ab Halim Tamuri

The purpose of this study was to examine the process of embedding values implemented by excellent teachers in teaching Islamic education in the multi-cultural society.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to examine the process of embedding values implemented by excellent teachers in teaching Islamic education in the multi-cultural society.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was a qualitative study, which used a combination of in-depth interviews, observation and document analysis for data collection. Using a purposive sampling technique, seven excellent Islamic education teachers were selected. The data were analysed using Atlas.ti 7.1.7.

Findings

The findings of the study show the process of embedding values among excellent teachers include the following aspects: teachers take into consideration the various differences among individuals in their classes, especially of learners’ names and family backgrounds, humour elements, praising of students, lectures, repetition practical areas, problem-solving and question and answer sessions. A variety of methods are used in the process of embedding values including two-way interactions between teachers and students. Teaching happens in stages that link to the cognitive level of the students and these learning environments allow the values to be exposed, taught and personally experienced by the students.

Practical implications

This study shows that teachers should use various types of teaching methods, i.e. light-hearted element, praising students, lectures, repetition, practical areas, problem-solving and question and answer sessions, to embed values during the lessons of Islamic education. Interaction between students and teachers takes place and creates a transformative process of knowledge and allowing the positive values to be taught effectively. They start to learn and appreciate the values of others and also be able to practice them in their daily lives. The students were exposed to the diversity of culture and various types of background of their friends. The awareness of the teachers in creating a learning environment that is sensitive to all students is very important. Thus, these methods should be taken into consideration by teachers to teach values and should be exposed during teacher training so they are able to implement them in the classroom.

Originality/value

This paper explores and describes methods of embedding of values used by excellent Islamic education teachers in the lessons of Islamic education. There are very few studies conducted in this area and this qualitative study is focussed on how values are thought in the lessons of Islamic education. These findings can be used by educators to improve the quality of the lessons based on most effective teaching methods used by the teachers in the lessons of Islamic education.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Molly Lee, Morshidi Sirat and Chang Da Wan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, in general, what are the contemporary external influences that have been dominant in Malaysian universities and what are the…

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4943

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate, in general, what are the contemporary external influences that have been dominant in Malaysian universities and what are the major local traditional practices that are also found in these universities.

Design/methodology/approach

From the literature review, the paper proposes a conceptual framework to explore hybridity in governance and management, programs and curriculum, teaching and learning, and research and service.

Findings

Using the conceptual framework, the paper discusses the Malaysian higher education in terms of Western influence and indigenization of Western models, the background context of Islamic universities and seven possible hybridities compiled from anecdotal evidences.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework and possible hybridities identified in the paper serve to provide the guide to a more systemic empirical investigation to examine the characteristics of Malaysian universities emerging from the interaction between external influence and local cultures. The Malaysian case also potentially contribute in exploring the question, “Are Asian universities different from Western universities?”.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2011

Amirul Afif Muhamat, Mohamad Nizam Jaafar and Norfaridah binti Ali Azizan

The purpose of this paper is to measure the sensitivity of the banks' customers towards the adoption of Arabic terminology in the Islamic banking industry.

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1614

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to measure the sensitivity of the banks' customers towards the adoption of Arabic terminology in the Islamic banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 100 respondents who were mainly banks' clients was surveyed through personally administered questionnaire and only 60 questionnaires are usable for the study. The remaining 40 questionnaires were rejected due to incomplete answers and error. The survey executed based on convenience sampling method. The study was conducted at Shah Alam for nearly two and a half months and the city chosen due to the exclusivity of the city's demographic; significant availability of white collar employees as its residents which illustrate a high income population, high literacy and high academic qualification.

Findings

The majority of the respondents agree that Arabic terminology gives competitive edge to the Islamic banks but at the same time they indicate that the catchy Arabic name will give them difficulty in gaining fast information about and comprehension of the product. The trend depicted by the non‐Muslims respondents when answering the questionnaire indicates that, in many cases, they are at the negative side on every statement given. Thus, it signifies a need from the Islamic banking side to manage this issue, since the non‐Muslims are majority clients of the industry in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

The response rate of 60 per cent for this study is considered good. However, the availability of more respondents would give higher rate of representation.

Practical implications

This paper provides insights for the interested parties to know the banks' clients' needs from the Islamic banking sector and will help to increase the number.

Originality/value

This paper measures the responses of banks' customers towards the adoption of Arabic terminology, in a multi‐racial society in which limited study has been done.

Details

International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8394

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Sri Rahayu Hijrah Hati, Niken Iwani Surya Putri, Sri Daryanti, Sigit Sulistiyo Wibowo, Anya Safira and Hapsari Setyowardhani

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand familiarity and profit-sharing rate on Muslim customers’ brand trust, perceived financial risk, perceived value…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of brand familiarity and profit-sharing rate on Muslim customers’ brand trust, perceived financial risk, perceived value and intention to invest in an Islamic bank.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects experimental design was applied in the study. Six experiments involving two brand familiarity levels and three profit-sharing rates were conducted using a total of 217 samples. Randomization was applied in the study, which generated unequal sample sizes for each group of experiments.

Findings

The findings of this experimental study demonstrated that Muslim customers’ familiarity with the bank’s brand has a significant impact on their brand trust and intention to invest in an Islamic bank. The study also found that the profit-sharing rate has a significant impact on the perceived value both with and without interaction with brand familiarity.

Research limitations/implications

The current study applies an independent measured design or a between-subjects experimental design, that resulted in unequal sample sizes. In addition, the study also does not control for the types of bank accounts owned by respondents. The design may invite the presence of confounding variables that exist due to individual differences and environmental variables.

Practical implications

The results show that Islamic bank managers should care about the brand familiarity issue, which strongly influences customers’ brand trust and customer intention to invest in an Islamic bank. In addition, Islamic bank managers should pay attention to the profit-sharing rate given to customers, as it interacts with brand familiarity in influencing customers’ perceived value.

Originality/value

This study examined the impact of brand familiarity and profit-sharing rate on Muslim consumers’ brand trust, perceived risk, perceived value and intention to save in an Islamic bank. The paper provides a shred of empirical evidence to the theoretical relationship between the subjective and objective cues that influence the formation of customers’ trust, perceived financial risk, perceived value and intention in the Islamic bank context.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Jonathan A.J. Wilson, Russell W. Belk, Gary J. Bamossy, Özlem Sandikci, Hermawan Kartajaya, Rana Sobh, Jonathan Liu and Linda Scott

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently…

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1962

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to bring together the thoughts and opinions of key members of the Journal of Islamic Marketing's (JIMA) Editorial Team, regarding the recently branded phenomenon of Islamic marketing – in the interests of stimulating further erudition.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors adopted an “eagle eye” method to investigate this phenomenon: Where attempts were made to frame general principles and observations; alongside a swooping view of key anecdotal observations – in order to ground and enrich the study. The authors participated in an iterative process when analysing longitudinal and contemporary phenomenological data, in order to arrive at a consensus. This was grounded in: triangulating individual and collective researcher findings; critiquing relevant published material; and reflecting upon known reviewed manuscripts submitted to marketing publications – both successful and unsuccessful.

Findings

The authors assert that a key milestone in the study and practice of marketing, branding, consumer behaviour and consumption in connection with Islam and Muslims is the emergence of research wherein the terms “Islamic marketing” and “Islamic branding” have evolved – of which JIMA is also a by‐product. Some have construed Islam marketing/branding as merely a niche area. Given the size of Muslim populations globally and the critical importance of understanding Islam in the context of business and practices with local, regional and international ramifications, scholarship on Islamic marketing has become essential. Western commerce and scholarship has been conducted to a limited extent, and some evidence exists that research is occurring globally. The authors believe it is vital for “Islamic marketing” scholarship to move beyond simply raising the flag of “Brand Islam” and the consideration of Muslim geographies to a point where Islam – as a way of life, a system of beliefs and practices, and religious and social imperatives – is amply explored.

Research limitations/implications

An “eagle eye” view has been taken, which balances big picture and grassroots conceptual findings. The topic is complex – and so while diverse expert opinions are cited, coverage of many issues is necessarily brief, due to space constraints.

Practical implications

Scholars and practitioners alike should find the thoughts contained in the paper of significant interest. Ultimately, scholarship of Islam's influences on marketing theory and practice should lead to results which have pragmatic implications, just as research on Islamic banking and finance has.

Originality/value

The paper appears to be the first to bring together such a diverse set of expert opinions within one body of work, and one that provides a forum for experts to reflect and comment on peers' views, through iteration. Also the term Crescent marketing is introduced to highlight how critical cultural factors are, which shape perceptions and Islamic practises.

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Kaba Abdoulaye

The use of bilingual authority files in academic and research libraries has been successful in most of the multicultural societies. Today, with the advancement of…

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1116

Abstract

The use of bilingual authority files in academic and research libraries has been successful in most of the multicultural societies. Today, with the advancement of information and communication technology many libraries and information services providers on the Internet are accessible in more than one language, facilitating access, retrieval and use of information for scattered users all over the world. Nevertheless, there are also challenges associated with the provision and use of bilingual authority files. This study analyses and describes bilingual authority files of the main library of the International Islamic University of Malaysia. The study also investigated perceptions of cataloguers and end‐users in relation to the bilingual authority files. All the three cataloguing staff at the “Department of Arabic and Religious Resources” and 23 end‐users were interviewed. Respondents felt that the use of bilingual authority files was essential for the success of the library use. However, the end‐users felt that more subject headings and bibliographic information of missing material should be provided. Meanwhile, the cataloguers believed that bilingualism has an effect on bibliographic control. They also felt that AACR2 and LCSH should be translated into the Arabic language.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Challenges of the Muslim World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-444-53243-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2003

W.A.C Adie MA

Roots of global Terrorism are in ‘failed’ states carved out of multiracial empires after World Wars I and II in name of ‘national self‐determination’. Both sides in the…

Abstract

Roots of global Terrorism are in ‘failed’ states carved out of multiracial empires after World Wars I and II in name of ‘national self‐determination’. Both sides in the Cold War competed to exploit the process of disintegration with armed and covert interventions. In effect, they were colluding at the expense of the ‘liberated’ peoples. The ‘Vietnam Trauma’ prevented effective action against the resulting terrorist buildup and blowback until 9/11. As those vultures come home to roost, the war broadens to en vision overdue but coercive reforms to the postwar system of nation states, first in the Middle East. Mirages of Vietnam blur the vision; can the sole Superpower finish the job before fiscal and/or imperial overstretch implode it?

Details

International Journal of Commerce and Management, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1056-9219

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