Search results

1 – 10 of over 69000
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1989

Derryan Paul

The growth of interest in local history shows no sign of dyingdown. Public libraries have clearly been affected by the increasingnumber of people who use them and by the…

Abstract

The growth of interest in local history shows no sign of dying down. Public libraries have clearly been affected by the increasing number of people who use them and by the foundation of new societies and journals. Equally great, but perhaps less obvious, is the impact made by certain specific developments. Local history is now integrated into the educational curriculum at all levels, it is the subject of radio and television programmes and has grown in popularity with publishers of monographs. The ways in which local studies libraries have been affected by these factors are examined. Public libraries are concentrated on, though there is some reference to local collections in academic libraries. In conclusion, it is suggested that staff should be specifically allocated to an education service and to media liaison work, and that one librarian should specialise in acquisitions.

Details

Library Review, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 August 2007

John Abdul Kargbo

Discusses the development of local history collections within libraries in Sierra Leone.

1301

Abstract

Purpose

Discusses the development of local history collections within libraries in Sierra Leone.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is a reflective viewpoint.

Findings

That there is a growing interest in local history collections in libraries in Sierra Leone, and that more formal structures should be put in place to safeguard these materials for the future.

Practical implications

Proposes some ways forward for ensuring the long term viability of local collections in Sierra Leone.

Originality/value

The article is the first on the topic of local history collections in Sierra Leone's libraries, and should be of interest to librarians around the world who have an interest in local history librarianship.

Details

Library Review, vol. 56 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2010

Tor Sveum

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relevance of local studies collections and contributions from local studies librarians to a Norwegian local history wiki.

810

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relevance of local studies collections and contributions from local studies librarians to a Norwegian local history wiki.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper focuses on access to metadata in the form of bibliographies, databases and catalogues, in addition to general articles on local history. The methodological approach is qualitative and comparative based on semi‐structured interviews with librarians in charge of local studies collections and with the administrators of the wiki. The study includes an analysis of a selection of local studies collections and criteria for inclusion into the local history wiki. A short comparison with history wikis in other countries is added.

Findings

Local studies collections contain valuable and unique material for the wiki, especially metadata resources. The expertise of librarians could increase the value of the wiki. Generally, librarians are not active contributors. Strategies for involvement are needed.

Originality/value

The paper may encourage and inspire local studies librarians to contribute actively to the wiki and incorporate relevant parts of their collections.

Details

New Library World, vol. 111 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Scott M. Waring

History teachers are continually seeking new ways in which they can actively involve their students and allow them to think more creatively. Creating local history

Abstract

History teachers are continually seeking new ways in which they can actively involve their students and allow them to think more creatively. Creating local history projects allows students to look beyond the information on the pages of their text and forces them to look deeper into the history of their local environment. Properly constructed community and local history projects assist students in “actually doing history” and engage them in authentic activities directly related to the study of history. As educators, we need to utilize the communities in which we live, because they offer a wealth of opportunities for learning and continue to be one of the least tapped resources for social studies teaching (Martorella, 1998). Presented in this paper are methods and resources that can be used when conducting local histories in the K-12 classrooms in a manner encouraging students to engage in historical inquiry in authentic and meaningful ways.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1968

LOCAL history achieved academic respectability in 1947 with the establishment of the Department of Local History at the University of Leicester. No longer need the local

Abstract

LOCAL history achieved academic respectability in 1947 with the establishment of the Department of Local History at the University of Leicester. No longer need the local historian feel ashamed of his craft or regard himself as a writer of footnotes to another's history.

Details

New Library World, vol. 69 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 25 April 2018

Caroline Hood and Peter Reid

The purpose of this paper is to examine issues associated with user engagement on social media with local history in the North East of Scotland and to focus on a case…

2042

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine issues associated with user engagement on social media with local history in the North East of Scotland and to focus on a case study of the Buckie and District Fishing Heritage Society, a small but very successful and professionally-run community-based local heritage organisation.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach using photo elicitation on social media was deployed in conjunction with analysis of the user interactions and the reach insights provided by Facebook to the page manager. Additionally, a focus group was used.

Findings

The research, although focussed on an individual case study, offers significant lessons which are more widely applicable in the local history and cultural heritage social media domain. Key aspects include user engagement and how digital storytelling can assist in the documentation of local communities ultimately contributing to local history research and the broader cultural memory. The significance of the image and the photo elicitation methodology is also explored.

Social implications

The research demonstrates new opportunities for engaging users and displaying historical content that can be successfully exploited by community heritage organisations. These are themes which will be developed within the paper. The research also demonstrates the value of photo elicitation in both historical and wider information science fields as a means of obtaining in-depth quality engagement and interaction with users and communities.

Originality/value

The research explored the underutilised method of photo elicitation in a local history context with a community possessed of a strong sense of local identity. In addition to exploring the benefits of this method, it presents transferable lessons for how small, community-based history and heritage organisation can engage effectively with their audience.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Suzanna K. Conrad

– The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible purposes of digital storytelling and discuss practical implementation in a community-based digital storytelling project.

2522

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate possible purposes of digital storytelling and discuss practical implementation in a community-based digital storytelling project.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study investigates the function of digital storytelling for archiving local history, specifically by journaling experiences during a digital storytelling grant project at a public library in Southern California.

Findings

This case study details a specific example of the impact digital storytelling can have on a community, both to foster community building and also to encourage documentation of local history. The main goal of the project was to present and archive filmed stories from local community members; however, the project also led to increased awareness of digital storytelling and the associated technology both within the library and the greater community.

Practical implications

This article should provide best practice guidelines for administering a community-based digital storytelling project including suggestions for outreach to the larger community, dealing with technical issues, and tackling operational issues.

Originality/value

Digital storytelling has had a profound impact on the way that society communicates and can be used effectively for purposes of outreach and activism, to educate using technology, or to document micro-histories. This case study provides an assessment of the current uses of digital storytelling and presents a successful implementation of a local history digital storytelling project at a public library.

Details

Library Review, vol. 62 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1963

AS J. L. Hobbs shows so clearly in his recent book, the interest in local history is growing enormously at present. The universities, training colleges and schools, as…

Abstract

AS J. L. Hobbs shows so clearly in his recent book, the interest in local history is growing enormously at present. The universities, training colleges and schools, as well as the institutions of further education, are all making more use of local studies—geographical, economic, social and historical—in their regular courses, in their advanced work, and in their publications.

Details

New Library World, vol. 64 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2010

Susan Xue

New (post‐1949) Chinese local gazetteers are one of the major primary resources for contemporary China Studies in the field of history, social sciences, humanities and…

Abstract

Purpose

New (post‐1949) Chinese local gazetteers are one of the major primary resources for contemporary China Studies in the field of history, social sciences, humanities and sciences. Major research libraries in North America have collected them; however, the research value of this series of publications has not yet fully explored. This paper aims at examining how new local gazetteers have been compiled, the scope of their content and research value, and how scholars have used them.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper explores the scope and importance of the new Chinese local gazetteers collection through reviewing relevant regulations, policies and guidelines regarding compilation of the new local gazetteers, and randomly examining over 30 provincial, city and county gazetteers.

Findings

The paper provides a detailed account of publishing history of this collection; rich and unique research information available; and approaches to collection development, including utilizing digitized gazetteers by Chinese governments.

Originality/value

The paper explores the development of new Chinese local gazetteers in a more systematic way and adds to the current literature on the unique research value this collection has to offer.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 20 July 2017

Melissa Adler

This chapter demonstrates how the University of Waikato in New Zealand adapted a global standard (the Library of Congress Classification) for local use by inscribing…

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates how the University of Waikato in New Zealand adapted a global standard (the Library of Congress Classification) for local use by inscribing topics related to and about Māori history and people.

The findings are the result of using library catalogs and classifications as primary historical documents.

The University of Waikato’s classification simultaneously uses and implicitly critiques a universal system written from a U.S. vantage point. It seems to acknowledge the benefits and necessities of using a globally recognized standard, as well as a need to inscribe local, anticolonial perspectives into that system.

The research relies on historical documents, and some aspects related to purpose and attribution are difficult to ascertain.

The local adaptation of the Library of Congress Classification may serve as a model for other local adaptations.

This may bring new dimensions to thinking about colonialism and anticolonialism in knowledge organization systems. It contributes to ongoing conversations regarding indigenous knowledge organization practices.

Although scholars have examined Māori subject headings, research on local shelf classifications in New Zealand have not been objects of study in the context of global and local knowledge organization. This chapter brings an important classification to light.

1 – 10 of over 69000