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Book part
Publication date: 24 June 2015

Sandra Corredor, Clemente Forero and Deepak Somaya

This paper examines the extent to which different sources of ideas for innovation are associated with novelty of innovation outcomes. We measure the novelty of product…

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which different sources of ideas for innovation are associated with novelty of innovation outcomes. We measure the novelty of product innovation using three well-established categories, ranging from highly novel new-to-world products to new-to-firm products that are essentially imitative, with products that are new-to-country (but not the world) being an intermediary category. In turn we investigate how knowledge derived from different external and internal (within-firm) sources of ideas can help firms increase innovation with different degrees of novelty. Our empirical analyses are conducted on a large sample of manufacturing firms from the South American emerging market of Colombia and show that many of the same sources of knowledge – such as scientific sources, production departments and managers – are associated with higher innovation in all three categories of novelty. However, some sources – notably external clients and internal interdisciplinary groups – are more significantly associated with more novel innovation than imitation. The implications of these findings for the literatures on innovation and imitation, and innovation by emerging market firms are discussed.

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Emerging Economies and Multinational Enterprises
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-740-6

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Article
Publication date: 9 January 2019

Mostaque Zebal, Ahmed Ferdous and Colin Chambers

The purpose of this paper is to develop and propose an integrated model of marketing knowledge from a tacit knowledge management perspective. This paper further aims at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and propose an integrated model of marketing knowledge from a tacit knowledge management perspective. This paper further aims at developing a linkage between explicit knowledge perspective (internal and external marketing) and tacit knowledge orientation of an organization, leading to improved business success.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper develops a conceptual model showing the integration of the internal, tacit and explicit knowledge perspectives that results in improved business success. The proposed model and associated propositions are drawn from the synthesis of relevant knowledge and marketing literature.

Findings

Five major associated propositions are offered in the paper, which inform both scholars and practitioners about what constitutes a holistic market orientation and how organizations can achieve business success by adopting both an internal and external orientation to tacit and explicit knowledge management.

Originality/value

The model makes an original contribution to theoretical and organizational marketing management knowledge. It does this by extending the conceptual and operational boundaries of existing models of internal and external marketing, aimed at helping organizations achieve competitive advantage and business success.

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Xiu‐Hao Ding, Heng Liu and Yongtao Song

After identifying two kinds of internal knowledge transfer strategies, the purpose of this paper is to examine their effectiveness and whether they induce knowledge

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Abstract

Purpose

After identifying two kinds of internal knowledge transfer strategies, the purpose of this paper is to examine their effectiveness and whether they induce knowledge spillovers among firms.

Design/methodology/approach

This study collected data in China and 219 questionnaires were achieved. Then, structure equation model by LISREL was used for hypotheses testing.

Findings

The empirical results suggest that both codification and rich‐media strategies have positive effects on internal knowledge transfer. Moreover, codification strategy has a negative effect on knowledge spillovers while rich‐media strategy does not influence knowledge spillovers significantly. Thus, codification and rich‐media strategies are not double‐edged swords.

Practical implications

This study provides firms with two strategies, codification and rich‐media, to promote internal knowledge transfer. Moreover, these strategies do not accelerate knowledge spillovers, and codification strategy even reduces knowledge spillovers. Firms can use these strategies to construct and sustain competitive advantages.

Originality/value

While many knowledge creation, storage and protection strategies are studied, little is known about internal knowledge transfer strategies. This study suggests two internal knowledge transfer strategies and confirms their effectiveness. Moreover, because the relationship between internal knowledge transfer strategies and knowledge spillovers has been puzzling for a long time, this study clarifies the relationship and finds that these strategies do not accelerate knowledge spillovers and some even restrain knowledge spillovers.

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Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Valeria Kiisk and Mait Rungi

Based on the sample of the European information and communications technology (ICT) companies, this paper aims to identify which strategy of knowledge generation is most…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the sample of the European information and communications technology (ICT) companies, this paper aims to identify which strategy of knowledge generation is most beneficial for companies: internal knowledge development or absorption of knowledge external to the company through corporate acquisition or merger.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a longitudinal analysis of European ICT companies was conducted, contrasting internal knowledge creation, in the form of patent accumulation and research and development (R&D) efforts, with external learning through merger-and-acquisition (M&A) activities to uncover the best strategies for performance maximization.

Findings

Results suggest that the two knowledge generation strategies are not complementary and demonstrate only marginal impact on organizational performance. However, intriguing patterns in combining the two became apparent. It was found that patent accumulation improves learning achieved through M&A activities, while also acting as a protection against corporate takeover. At the same time, the internal knowledge generation strategy was found to have a negative impact on financial performance, with external knowledge generation demonstrating somewhat mixed results.

Practical implications

This paper provides practical insights into the patterns of internal and external knowledge generation activities. The two strategies were found not to be complementary, implying that companies must carefully choose their preferences.

Originality/value

This large-scale study tackles the interplay between internal and external knowledge generation strategies, which are mostly studied separately. It reveals new patterns in corporate acquisition and divestment strategies as sources of new knowledge. It also ties the knowledge paradigm to organizational performance.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 14 October 2020

Muhammad Zia Ul Haq

Despite the significance, no study examines the relationship between supply chain (SC) learning components and focal firm performance. This study aims to investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the significance, no study examines the relationship between supply chain (SC) learning components and focal firm performance. This study aims to investigate different types of SC learning (supplier, customer and internal learning) and their influence on the focal firm’s operational and financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded in knowledge-based view and absorptive capacity theory, this study applies structural equation modeling to test the conceptual model based on data collected from 213 manufacturing firms in China.

Findings

The findings indicate that supplier and customer learning improve internal learning. Customer and internal learning have direct influence on operational performance, whereas internal learning mediates the relationship between supplier learning and operational performance. Moreover, all three dimensions of SC learning do not affect financial performance directly but operational performance plays the mediating role in their relationship.

Research limitations/implications

This study only investigates SC learning outcomes without exploring its antecedents. In addition, SC learning and their impacts on firm performance are tested empirically with cross-sectional data collected only from manufacturing firms in China.

Practical implications

The findings furnish managers to seek for competitive advantages through different types of SC learning.

Originality/value

This study offers new insights concerning the performance implications of SC learning. It divides SC learning into dimensions and shows the distinctive impacts of these dimensions on focal firm’s performance using an empirical method.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Shoaib Abdul Basit and Kehinde Medase

The combination of different knowledge sources has been considered conducive for innovation performance. While the literature has advanced regarding the combination of…

Abstract

Purpose

The combination of different knowledge sources has been considered conducive for innovation performance. While the literature has advanced regarding the combination of knowledge inputs as in internal and external research and development (R&D), the evolvement of knowledge blend from customers and competitors has also received substantial attention. The purpose of this paper is to delineate the sources of information from the customers into private and public and examine their direct effect on firm-level innovation. While the extant literature is mixed regarding this, no clear-cut results have emerged yet on the effect of knowledge combination from the private and public customers with internal R&D and human capital on innovation activities. This study, however, shed more lights on the inconclusiveness of the effect of knowledge diversity on firm-level innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the microdata from the German Community Innovation Survey 2013, the authors employ a binary instrumental variable treatment model with Heckman selection, a suitable strategy to estimate binary variables to cope with a possible endogeneity issue.

Findings

The paper demonstrates that knowledge from customers in the private and public sector, and competitors are positively and significantly associated with innovation. The authors find evidence of a positive and significant effect of the combination of firm internal knowledge competencies with information from the public sector. In contrary, the blend of knowledge competencies with information from customers in the private sector and information from the competitors results in decline to innovation. The results also show that the blend of internal R&D with knowledge source from the customers in the public sector appears to have a stronger influence in the manufacturing sector than services. The results offer strong evidence of the positive link between knowledge diversity and firm-level innovation performance.

Practical implications

The results have significant managerial implications on the role of the blend of different sources of information in supporting a compelling internal knowledge development to optimise innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study is foremost to focus on knowledge sources from the customers in the public and private sector and its relationship with R&D and human capital in supporting a successful introduction of innovation.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Tao Wang, Xue Yu and Nan Cui

This paper aims to provide a new perspective in investigating how internal research and development (R&D) and external knowledge acquisition interact regarding their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a new perspective in investigating how internal research and development (R&D) and external knowledge acquisition interact regarding their influence on innovation performance in an emerging market context. Building on an attention-based view (ABV), it argues that internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition can be substitutes for each other in emerging markets. Its contingency factors are also discussed according to the principles of the ABV.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed hypotheses were empirically tested using a Tobit model approach. The data used was from the enterprise survey and the follow-up innovation survey conducted by the World Bank in 10 emerging market countries.

Findings

The results indicate that internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition entails a substitute effect among emerging market firms (EMFs). A higher level of manager’s open-mindedness to external knowledge and firm performance and a lower level of firm administrative control help mitigate the substitute effect of internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition. While adequate financial resources may not necessarily mitigate the substitute effect, it is an essential condition for the external knowledge acquisition to play a role in enhancing innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

The research uses a set of cross-sectional data. A dynamic study will provide a deeper understanding of the long-term effects of innovation investments.

Practical implications

To better use innovation investments, EMFs need to assess their specific conditions and the possible substitute effect of internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition activities.

Originality/value

Previous research discussing the interactive effect of internal R&D and external knowledge acquisition has mostly focused on an absorptive capacity perspective, which represents a firm’s technical ability. This study argues that these investments not only involve in absorbing knowledge technically but also form a challenge for the limited firm resources and can cause cognitive problems in management, especially for EMFs.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Abdullah Fahad AlMulhim

This study aims to analyze the effect of external and internal sources of knowledge on frugal innovation. Moreover, it investigated how this relationship is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze the effect of external and internal sources of knowledge on frugal innovation. Moreover, it investigated how this relationship is weakened/strengthened by the moderation of innovation capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study’s data were taken from 288 small and medium enterprises (SMEs) by using a questionnaire survey. To analyze this data, analysis of a moment structures software (AMOS) was used. Structural equation modeling was conducted to test the hypothesis and the slope test investigated moderation.

Findings

The study results showed the significant effect of internal and external sources of knowledge on frugal innovation. Moreover, the results highlighted that the moderating role of innovation capabilities strengthens this relationship.

Research limitations/implications

The SMEs of “Saudi Arabia” were considered for this study. Among these, this paper only focused on enterprises owned by Saudi citizens. Moreover, the data were collected from 288 SMEs. Therefore, future studies can be conducted from any other country with larger sample size. This study has used moderation of innovation capabilities and future studies can use information credibility as a moderating variable.

Originality/value

Previously, many studies have highlighted the importance of knowledge for innovation, but the effects of knowledge sources from the perspective of SMEs and emerging markets remain unexplained. Very limited studies have explored the relation of knowledge sources with frugal innovation. This study first examines the moderating role of innovation capabilities between “internal and external knowledge sources” and frugal innovation. Moreover, this research reveals the SMEs of Saudi Arabia and its sector of frugal products.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Ming‐Ji James Lin and Chih‐Jou Chen

The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of internal integration and external integration on three types of shared knowledge (shared knowledge of internal

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1865

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of internal integration and external integration on three types of shared knowledge (shared knowledge of internal capabilities, customers, and suppliers) and whether more leads to superior firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on results from a large‐scale survey. The empirical data used in the study comprises of 245 high technology firms in Taiwan. This study applies the confirmatory factor analysis to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model, and the structural equation modeling (SEM) to investigate the hypotheses and research model.

Findings

The results show that internal integration and external integration significantly influence shared knowledge of internal capabilities, customers and suppliers among new product development (NPD) team members. The results also indicate that team members' shared knowledge enable the firm to improve innovation capability and new product competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

As the data used in the study was cross‐sectional, the causal relationships and the sustainability of firm and product innovative performance cannot be easily captured. Future research can examine how factors of individual traits, organizational characteristics, and external environmental factors may influence the shared knowledge and product competitive advantage.

Practical implications

This study emphasizes the importance of the firm's integration to utilize and share knowledge of internal capabilities, customers and suppliers effectively. Besides, the relationships among internal/external integration, shared knowledge, firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage may provide a clue regarding how firms can manage integrations and promote knowledge‐sharing culture to sustain their firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage.

Originality/value

As only little empirical research has been conducted on the impact of internal/external integration on the firm's innovative capability and product competitive advantage through shared knowledge, the empirical evidence reported here makes a valuable contribution in this highly important area.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Heba Fawzi Ayoub, Ayman Bahjat Abdallah and Taghreed S. Suifan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of supply chain integration (SCI) in terms of supplier integration, customer integration, and internal integration…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of supply chain integration (SCI) in terms of supplier integration, customer integration, and internal integration on knowledge management (KM) and technical innovation (TI). The study also investigates the effect of KM on TI. Furthermore, the mediating effect of KM on the relationship between SCI and TI is investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Study model and hypotheses were developed based on literature review. The study is based on survey data collected from 217 Jordanian manufacturing companies in electrical, electronics, machinery, and mechanical appliances industries. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were applied to assess construct validity. Direct and indirect effects were tested using structural equation modeling and bootstrap re-sampling technique.

Findings

The results reveal that supplier integration and customer integration have positive effects on KM and TI, while internal integration has not. Also, KM has a positive effect on TI. In addition, KM mediates supplier integration-TI and customer integration-TI relationships, while does not mediate internal integration-TI relationship.

Originality/value

Most existing studies examined the effect of KM on SCI and supply chain management. This study argues and empirically demonstrates that SCI contributes to KM capability of manufacturing companies. Moreover, this is one of the first studies to investigate the mediating role of KM on SCI-TI relationship. The paper provides evidence that external integration is superior to internal integration in enhancing KM and TI.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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