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1 – 10 of over 202000
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2022

Achutha Jois and Somnath Chakrabarti

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond…

Abstract

Purpose

The education services sector faces ever-changing global market dynamics with creative disruptions. Building knowledge brands can push the higher education sector beyond its geographical boundaries into the global arena. This study aims to identify key constructs, their theoretical background and dimensions that aid in building a global knowledge brand. The authors' research focuses on adapting and validating scales for global knowledge and education services brands from well-established academic literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors have adopted a mixed methodology approach and a systematic literature review. Authors interviewed 18 subject matter experts as part of content and face validity to arrive at select constructs, dimensions and items. Quantitative methods with random sampling were adopted as the primary methodology. Initially, the survey was administered to 390 students to test preliminary results. The survey was also administered to 5,112 students at a later part of this study. Valid responses stood at 3,244 with a 63% response rate. Further, the authors conducted confirmatory factor analysis, exploratory factor analysis and structural equation modeling to test the reliability and validity of scales. This study analyzed composite reliability, convergent validity and discriminant validity to finalize items for scales. The authors also validated the hypotheses based on the discriminant validity assessment scores.

Findings

Authors' key research findings are that academic stimulus, campus infrastructure and student intent play a significant role in campus culture and events design and experience at campus. Authors were able to bring out 16 key constructs and 55 critical dimensions vital to global education services brand building. This study also adapted and validated 99 items that meet construct validity and composite reliability criteria. This study also highlights that constructs such as student intent, academic stimulus, campus infrastructure scalability, selection mechanism, pedagogical content knowledge, brand identity, events experience and campus culture play a vital role in global brand recognition.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' work is fairly generalizable to education services and the higher education sector. However, this study must be extrapolated and empirically validated in other industry sectors. The research implications of this study are that it aided the authors in building theoretical background for student brand loyalty theory, student expectation theory and study loyalty theory. This study adds to the body of knowledge by contributing to theoretical concepts on students, knowledge culture, events, infrastructure and branding. Researchers can adopt the scales proposed in this study to build research models in higher education branding. This study acts as a catalyst for building theories in education services areas. Researchers can delve deep into proposed research aspects of campus infrastructure, knowledge infrastructure, campus knowledge culture, events design and events experience.

Practical implications

This study aids educators and brand managers to develop global education services and optimize their effort and budget. Administrators in the education services sector must focus on practical aspects of student perception, campus infrastructure, culture and events experience. Practically administrators can reorient their efforts based on this study to achieve global brand recognition.

Social implications

This study highlights that students are not customers but are co-creators of value in the education sector. This study provides scales and dimensions needed to build co-creation frameworks and models.

Originality/value

Most research in higher education branding has not covered wider aspects of global brand building. Existing theories proposed in higher education and education services articles cover only narrower aspects of campus infrastructure, culture, events design and branding. This study presents a comprehensive list of critical factors that play a vital role in global knowledge brand building. This study highlights the constructs and scales integral to building a global education services brand.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 November 2022

Mingxuan Xu, Tao Jin, Weihong Kong, Yazhi Li, Xing Shen, Cheng Liu and Tianyang Zhu

This study aims to assess the vibrational behavior of a large transport airship based on finite element (FE) simulation and modal testing of its scaled model.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to assess the vibrational behavior of a large transport airship based on finite element (FE) simulation and modal testing of its scaled model.

Design/methodology/approach

A full-size parametric FE model of the airframe was established according to the structural layout of the composite beam-cable airframe of the airship, and vibrational analysis of the airframe was conducted. The influence of cable pre-tension load on the inherent properties of the airframe was investigated. Based on the simplification of the full-size FE model, scaled numerical and test models of the airframe, with a geometric scale factor of 1:50, were established and built.

Findings

The simulation and test results of the scaled models indicated that the mode shapes of the full-size and scaled models were similar. The natural frequencies of both the full-size and scaled models complied with the theoretical similarity relation of the frequency response.

Originality/value

This study demonstrated that the vibrational test results of the scaled model with very large scaling can be used to characterize the modal properties of the beam-cable airframe of a large transport airship.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1748-8842

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 November 2022

Kelmara Mendes Vieira, Taiane Keila Matheis, Aureliano Angel Bressan, Ani Caroline Grigion Potrich, Leander Luiz Klein and Tamara Otilia Amaral Rosenblum

The aim of the study is to build and validate a perceived financial well-being scale (PFWBS).

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the study is to build and validate a perceived financial well-being scale (PFWBS).

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 34 items were developed on a five-point Likert scale. Validation involved two phases and four steps. In the qualitative phase, interviews, validation by specialists and the pre-test were carried out. In the quantitative phase, a sample of 1,020 cases was used in the exploratory stage and another sample of 2,293 individuals in the confirmatory validation stage.

Findings

The PFWBS is composed of 23 items distributed in four dimensions (financial security, financial tranquility, financial freedom and satisfaction with financial management) that identify the perception of financial well-being of the consumers of financial products.

Practical implications

The authors propose a methodological framework that allows researchers, managers and policy makers to use the indicator to assess citizens' perception of financial well-being.

Social implications

The PFWBS can be useful in evaluating the results of different public policies, such as income transfer programs and financial education policies. It can also serve as a parameter for the financial system to assess the perception of its customers, helping to evaluate products and services.

Originality/value

Financial well-being lacks valid measurement scales in the literature. This study advances by creating a scale for the assessment of the perception of financial well-being, which can be applied in different contexts.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2022

Julia Strengers, Leonie Mutsaers, Lisa van Rossum and Ernst Graamans

Scale-ups have a crucial role in our society and economy, are known for their fast growth and high performance and undergo significant organizational change. Research on…

Abstract

Purpose

Scale-ups have a crucial role in our society and economy, are known for their fast growth and high performance and undergo significant organizational change. Research on the organizational elements that ensure scale-ups sustaining high performance is limited. This empirical study aims to investigate the organizational culture in scale-ups using the Competing Values Framework, including the clan, adhocracy, the market, hierarchy cultures and its relation to performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in five scale-ups. Surveys provided data of 116 employees on organizational culture, assessed using the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) and perceived performance. The aggregate outcomes and performance measures were analyzed using correlation analysis. Interviews were held with ten top managers and mirrored against the quantitative data.

Findings

The results show that top managers and employees have different perspectives on the culture scale-ups are supposed to have. Top managers perceive market culture as more and hierarchy culture as less present in their organizations than employees. The clan and adhocracy culture are positively correlated to performance and are preferred by employees. Market and hierarchy culture types are negatively correlated to performance and are least preferred by employees.

Research limitations/implications

It enables scale-up leaders to specifically intervene when cultural elements are experienced by employees that will not drive performance and fit the high performance and fast-growing scale-up environment.

Originality/value

This study is the first that showed that organizational-wide surveys, combined with in-depth interviews, are suitable for top managers of scale-ups to diagnose the organizational culture and the effect on the organization's performance.

Article
Publication date: 6 September 2022

Ibrahim Arpaci and Ersin Ateş

Cybercrimes increase day by day in parallel to cyber-attacks and cyber-threats. Due to such an increase, required cybersecurity precautions against all kinds of…

Abstract

Purpose

Cybercrimes increase day by day in parallel to cyber-attacks and cyber-threats. Due to such an increase, required cybersecurity precautions against all kinds of cyber-attacks and cyber-threats should be taken by both organizations and individuals. This study aims to develop a reliable and valid measurement tool to measure cybercrime awareness levels of individuals.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a scale named as Cybercrime Awareness Scale (CAS) has been developed and psychometric properties of the scale have been tested by two separate studies.

Findings

The first study included a total of 500 respondents (294 female and 206 male). In the first study, factor structure of the proposed scale has been determined through an exploratory factor analysis. The results revealed a three-factor structure (i.e. information systems crimes, personal data crimes, and privacy and security). Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficients for the subdimensions were 0.95, 0.92, and 0.90, respectively. The sample of the second study consisted of 494 respondents (281 female and 213 male). The confirmatory-factor-analysis results revealed that three-factor structure is valid and optimal model. Further, the proposed scale demonstrated moderate concurrent validity results in relation to the Digital Data Security Awareness Scale.

Originality/value

Findings indicated that the CAS is a valid and reliable measurement tool to measure individuals' cybercrime awareness level. This study makes a novel contribution to the existing cybersecurity literature by providing the CAS, which is developed by following rigorous methodological standards.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-01-2022-0023/

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 September 2022

Majid Ghasemy, James A. Elwood and Geoffrey Scott

Given the increased emphasis on embedding the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) in the curriculum, research, engagement activities and operations…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the increased emphasis on embedding the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs) in the curriculum, research, engagement activities and operations of higher education institutions, this comparative study aims to replicate an earlier international study of Turnaround Leadership for Sustainability in Higher Education (TLSHE) in the unique context of Malaysia and Japan. This paper also presents a case for closer focus on developing Education for Sustainability (EfS) leaders in institutions of higher learning.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is a quantitative comparative research. The authors collected data for EfS-related variables from lecturers affiliated with Malaysian and Japanese public and private universities. Building on the data and results from the TLSHE study, this study made a series of within- and between-sample descriptive comparisons from different angles and levels. To generalize the findings, this study used gender and experience outside higher education as control variables and compared the academics from the Malaysian and the Japanese institutions through the path modeling framework.

Findings

The comparisons showed that except for two domains, namely, contextual factors influencing EfS leadership and the EfS leadership development approaches, the means of all other domains based on the data collected from the Malaysian sample were the highest, followed by means from the international TLSHE sample, and finally the means from the Japanese sample. This study also observed that transparency, engagement with EfS initiatives at different levels, passion for teaching and learning, and creative and lateral thinking were among the top indicators. The inferential tests revealed significant differences between the academics from Japan and Malaysia as well.

Practical implications

The findings of the analyses can be used to ensure that the selection and development of EfS leaders (in this case, lecturers who may be formal or informal EfS leaders), not just at the central but at the local level in the distinctive context of Japan and Malaysia, focus on what counts and the good ideas embodied in the 17 UN SDGs are actually put into practice. This study has also highlighted the policy implications with respect to the gender and the previous work experience of lecturers outside higher education sector in more detail.

Originality/value

This study compares the perceptions of two samples of academics from Asian countries with the perceptions of the international TLSHE sampled EfS leaders in terms of EfS leadership-related issues and therefore, increases the awareness of academic community in this regard. It also highlights the role of lecturers (e.g. professors) as intellectual academic leaders in achieving SDGs. Moreover, this study shows that lecturers’ gender and previous work experience outside higher education should be considered when developing and implementing policies on EfS leadership.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

S. Mostafa Rasoolimanesh, Faizan Ali, Josip Mikulić and Seden Dogan

The purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize the scale development practices in hospitality and tourism and propose updated guidelines applicable for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to critically review and synthesize the scale development practices in hospitality and tourism and propose updated guidelines applicable for both reflective and composite scales.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a critical review of a sample of scale development papers published in six top-tier tourism and hospitality journals, the current guidelines' weaknesses and strengths and their applications are identified. Updated procedures are proposed to overcome these weaknesses.

Findings

This review showed several issues in applying existing guidelines, including incomplete and unclear data collection processes, inconsistent data analysis processes including validity/reliability assessment and lack of criteria to identify and assess composite scales. As such, this paper proposes updated guidelines by incorporating the confirmatory composite analysis to assess composite scales.

Originality/value

This paper offers unique theoretical and methodological contributions to scale development literature, by identifying the shortcomings of current practices of scale development and propose guidelines for both reflective and composite scales. The current scale development procedures cannot be applied for composite scales, and so the results of composite scale development using the current procedures are questionable. The updated guidelines by the current study improve new scales' accuracy, reliability and validity.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 October 2022

Divyang Purohit and Rachita Jayswal

With changing employment conditions, technological advancement, frequent manpower reduction and global competition, the relevance of the protean and boundaryless career…

Abstract

Purpose

With changing employment conditions, technological advancement, frequent manpower reduction and global competition, the relevance of the protean and boundaryless career concepts is increasing. With this, the country’s culture plays a pivotal role in career choice. The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate protean and boundaryless career scales for college passing out students and in the Indian context. The protean career scale was measured by self-directed and values-driven dimensions, while the boundaryless career scale was measured by boundaryless mindset and organizational mobility preference.

Design/methodology/approach

The first step involved defining construct and determining face validity. The data collected via questionnaire from India’s final year engineering students were subjected to exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis in the second and third steps, respectively. Finally, the nomological validity was tested by establishing the relationship between factors influencing career choice and newly developed protean and boundaryless career.

Findings

The result suggested using a two-factor model with a protean career (combining self-directed and values-driven items) and a boundaryless career as a separate construct for college passing out students.

Research limitations/implications

The developed scale has nine items that can be used to conduct surveys at the time of campus hiring by academic scholars, HR managers, and practitioners who are working on the identification, development and management of human talent as a part of any human resource management system.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first approach to developing the protean and boundaryless career scale for college passing out students and in the Indian context which can be replicable for South Asian countries.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 September 2022

Galen Trail, Don Lee, Stavros Triantafyllidis, Jessica R. Braunstein-Minkove, Ari Kim, Kristi Sweeney, Wanyong Choi and Priscila Alfaro-Barrantes

This paper aims to determine if single-item (SI) needs' and values' measures have similar reliability and validity values to multi-item (MI) measures of the same…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine if single-item (SI) needs' and values' measures have similar reliability and validity values to multi-item (MI) measures of the same constructs and thus could be substituted by sport marketers to predict internal motivating aspects of sport consumer attitudes and behavior. In addition, the authors wish to determine whether a small subset of needs and values listed in current measures are sufficient to predict sport consumer attitudes and behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

In this two-study design, the first study was a national sample (N = 439) comparing reliability and validity of single-item scales to multi-item scales. In the second study the authors collected data from fans and spectators of four different teams (N1 = 583; N2 = 1164; N3 = 213; N4 = 404) to determine the impact of needs and values on sport consumer attitudes and behavior.

Findings

The authors determined that in 89% of the scales, single-item measures of needs and values were just as reliable and valid as their associated multi-item measures. The authors also found that a small subset of the needs and values explain a meaningful amount of variance in sport consumer attitudes and behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The authors determined that in 89% of the scales, single-item measures of needs and values were just as reliable and valid as their associated multi-item measures. The authors also found that a small subset of the needs and values explain a meaningful amount of variance in sport consumer attitudes and behaviors.

Originality/value

The authors show that as motives for sport consumption, single-item measures of personal needs and values are equivalent to multi-item measures and not all needs and values used in previous sport research are necessary because they do not predict a meaningful amount of variance in sport consumer attitudes and behaviors. The authors identified a small number of single-item measures that practitioners can easily use in short surveys that will predict a statistically meaningful amount of variance in sport consumer attitudes and behaviors.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2012

Luís Simões and Luís Borges Gouveia

This chapter describes a research study in which data about the uses of Facebook by higher education students were gathered simultaneously with measurements of a set of…

Abstract

This chapter describes a research study in which data about the uses of Facebook by higher education students were gathered simultaneously with measurements of a set of psychological dimensions (personal and collective self-esteem, self-concept, general self-efficacy, satisfaction with social support and with academic life, and several aspects of academic experiences: interpersonal, career, institutional, personal and course satisfaction). The final result of the study is a path model inspired on the structural model proposed by Mazman and Usluel (2010) in which the psychological variables that have a significant influence on the academic use of Facebook were incorporated. A positive total effect of identity collective self-esteem in the educational use of Facebook was found and a negative total effect was found for public collective self-esteem in the educational usage of Facebook (EUF). Institutional adaptation proved to have a significant positive total effect on students’ willingness to use Facebook for educational purposes. Satisfaction with life was not a direct predictor of the educational use of Facebook. However, it was a direct predictor of the use of Facebook for work-related purposes, which was the strongest predictor of educational use of Facebook. Therefore, although the effect of satisfaction with life in the educational use of Facebook was only indirect, it was nevertheless positive and statistically significant.

Details

Increasing Student Engagement and Retention Using Social Technologies
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-239-4

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 202000