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Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Natalia Fernández-Jimeno

This paper analyzes how an infertile body is shaped by social discourses and reproductive technologies. Reproductive governances are articulated in this context by ideas…

Abstract

This paper analyzes how an infertile body is shaped by social discourses and reproductive technologies. Reproductive governances are articulated in this context by ideas and social values regarding family and motherhood, the binomial of infertility-TRA, legislation and norms and health professionals' practices. In addition, it shows how diverse infertile bodies experience (and withstand) these reproductive governances. Various sources have been consulted, including newspapers, biographical books, bibliographic sources from specialized literature and interviews carried out by the author.

Details

Reproductive Governance and Bodily Materiality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-438-0

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 August 2017

Nicole Maki Weller

Health-seeking behaviors (HSB) for infertility are influenced my multiple factors. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization states that enabling resources and…

Abstract

Health-seeking behaviors (HSB) for infertility are influenced my multiple factors. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Utilization states that enabling resources and predisposing factors are essential in predicting HSB, and this study examined the relationship between state-level mandates that insurance providers cover infertility service on the rates of HSB for infertility among a nationally representative sample of women.

This study used data from the National Survey of Family Growth, identified 15 states with state-level mandates as enabling resources, and used sociodemographic characteristics as predisposing resources. Using discrete-time event-history analyses, and retrospective accounts of infertility HSB, these variables were examined to determine if residing in a state with state-level insurance mandates would increase the likelihood of HSB for infertility.

Results indicated an impact of state-level mandates on HSB for infertility. Specifically, the rates of HSB for infertility were higher among women residing in states with state-level mandates.

A limitation in this research stems from a data restriction that forced identifying a place-of-residence before or after 2000. To overcome this, multiple analyses, and a nested model comparison were tested to measure the effect of state-level mandates on HSB.

The comparative analysis of the rates of HSB for women residing in states with state-level mandates has not been considered before, and the results provide further detail into the infertility experience for women and their partners.

Details

Health and Health Care Concerns Among Women and Racial and Ethnic Minorities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-150-8

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2022

Léa Linconstant

Examining infertility through the prism of gender allows a more refined understanding of what infertility does to persons. Draw on the research conducted in a public…

Abstract

Examining infertility through the prism of gender allows a more refined understanding of what infertility does to persons. Draw on the research conducted in a public centre for assisted reproduction in Italy, this chapter will show how the diagnosis of infertility fits into a medical description which is differentiated according to gender. By analyzing the way in which infertility is described and constructed in the course of consultations, we will see how infertility is understood both as a modality of relationship and action and as a property of persons.

Details

Reproductive Governance and Bodily Materiality
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-438-0

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Sima Mirzaei Moghadam, Hassan Mahmoodi, Farzaneh Zaheri and Azad Shokri

The aim of this study is to investigate the gender inequalities in perceived stress and the influencing factors in infertile couples in Iranian society.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate the gender inequalities in perceived stress and the influencing factors in infertile couples in Iranian society.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted on infertile couples who were referring to Kurdistan Infertility Diagnosis and Treatment Medical Center in 2019. Demographic and clinical information questionnaire, Newton's Infertility perceived stress questionnaire, Rosenberg's standard self-confidence questionnaire and the multidimensional scale of social support were used. Multiple linear logistic models were also used.

Findings

A total of 560 couples (1,120 people) participated in the study. The average perceived infertility-related stress, self-esteem scores and social support and social-emotional loneliness were 173.95 ± 41.87, 13.99 ± 2.29 and 27.81 ± 7.33, respectively, which were significantly different scores across infertility cause and sex (P < 0.05). Males compared to females had lower perceived infertility-related stress (169.93 ± 42.51 vs 177.97 ± 40.86, P = 0.001) and self-esteem scores (14.33 ± 2.29 vs 13.66 ± 2.24, P < 0.001) and social support and social-emotional loneliness (32.92 ± 9.31 vs 30.94 ± 9.04, P < 0.001). The partners who reported themselves as infertile, compared significantly higher in perceived infertility-related stress than those who reported their spouse being infertile (194.24 ± 35.33 vs 141.90 ± 39.28), lower self-esteem scores (12.77 ± 2.21 vs 13.94 ± 1.56) and social support and social-emotional loneliness score (27.81 ± 7.33 vs 30.11 ± 7.70). Also, after taking potential confounders into account with increase in each score of self-esteem, 12.19 units of stress decreases (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 11.40–12.99) and with increase in each score of social support and social-emotional loneliness, 3.45 units of stress decreases (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 3.28–3.63).

Originality/value

There is perceived stress among infertile couples, and this rate is higher among infertile people and women. Therefore, it seems that specific intervention programs for infertile couples should be implemented based on the results of this study, and their stress levels in a way that self-esteem and support for both partners be increased and the perceived stress among women and infertile individuals be decreased.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Yeter Durgun Ozan and Mesude Duman

This study aimed to examine the effect of causes of infertility related to gender differences on the distress level of women who were treated for infertility.

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Abstract

Purpose

This study aimed to examine the effect of causes of infertility related to gender differences on the distress level of women who were treated for infertility.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The sample consisted of 314 women who were treated for infertility between September 2016 and June 2017. Data were collected as “Sociodemographic Characteristics Form” and “Infertility Distress Scale.”

Findings

A statistically significant difference was found between the mean distress scores of the women for whom the reason for infertility was related to a female factor, and of the women for whom this reason was related to a male factor.

Research limitations/implications

The situation should be determined with quantitative studies, and the reason for the differences should be determined with qualitative studies.

Practical implications

Infertility nurses should develop a care plan that ensures that couples understand their feelings, and which enhances their mutual respect and partnership.

Social implications

The study highlights the importance of cultural awareness in the care of infertile couples.

Originality/value

The authors highlight some important aspects about the gender difference on women's distress level.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Marian Pitts and Francine Hanley

This project surveyed a sample of 280 male and female secondary students from Melbourne between the ages of 14 and 18 concerning their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs…

Abstract

This project surveyed a sample of 280 male and female secondary students from Melbourne between the ages of 14 and 18 concerning their knowledge, attitudes and beliefs about infertility. Many do not feel personally susceptible to future infertility problems, and most are optimistic about medical advances to alleviate fertility problems in the future. Sexuality education structured with infertility prevention in mind needs to ensure that students have a framework for thinking about the topic of prevention. The framework should include information from a range of perspectives. These would include a basic but accurate structural understanding of human reproductive systems; a realistic picture of human reproduction within a context of change across the lifespan and the social context of infertility.

Details

Health Education, vol. 104 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 15 December 2020

Özlem Doğan Yüksekol, Mesude Duman and Yeter Durgun Ozan

This study was conducted to analyze the correlation between gender perception and infertility distress of infertile women.

Abstract

Purpose

This study was conducted to analyze the correlation between gender perception and infertility distress of infertile women.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a descriptive-analytical study conducted with 255 women receiving treatment in the in vitro fertilization unit of a medical faculty hospital in Turkey. Study data were collected using sociodemographic questions as well as the Perception of Gender Scale (PGS) and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS).

Findings

It was found that the PGS mean score was 69.65 and the IDS mean score was 53.1. It was determined that there was a negative, moderate and significant correlation between gender perception and infertility distress levels of women in the infertility treatment process (r = −0.263, p < 0.001).

Originality/value

As a result of the study, a negative, moderate, significant correlation was detected between gender perception and infertility distress.

Details

Journal of Health Research, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0857-4421

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 23 August 2018

Megumi Fieldsend

Becoming a mother is a significant transition in adult development. For women who wanted to have children but found themselves unable to do so, life without the fulfilment…

Abstract

Becoming a mother is a significant transition in adult development. For women who wanted to have children but found themselves unable to do so, life without the fulfilment of motherhood can affect meaning-making in everyday life. Although increasing numbers of studies concerning childlessness have been carried out, much of this research has tended to focus on infertility and issues around fertility treatments. Little is known, however, about the psychological impact childlessness can have on women in midlife and how they experience the absence of children. The aim of this chapter is to offer readers an overview of psychological understanding in current research trends by reviewing papers that focus on women in midlife who are involuntarily childless. Findings from the 40 most relevant papers will be discussed under one of four key features: (1) psychological distress: medical consequences of infertility, (2) childlessness: life-span perspectives, (3) involuntary childlessness: psychosocial perspectives and (4) coping: ways of building resilience. The findings point to the dominance of quantitative approaches in researching infertility, while confirming that little has been carried out that looks at lived experience of involuntary childlessness. I hope the findings shown here will point to the necessity of psychological research applying qualitative experiential approaches that can facilitate a deeper understanding of women facing this challenge.

Details

Voluntary and Involuntary Childlessness
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-362-1

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Gayle A. Sulik and Astrid Eich-Krohm

Purpose – This chapter examines medical consumerism and the changing relations between patients as consumers and the medical system across two women's health contexts…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter examines medical consumerism and the changing relations between patients as consumers and the medical system across two women's health contexts, breast cancer and infertility.

Methodology/approach – The analysis draws on two qualitative studies: The first explores the experiences of 60 breast cancer survivors through in-depth interviews and participant observation (Sulik, 2005), and the second uses in-depth interviews to analyze 18 women's experiences with infertility (Eich-Krohm, 2000).

Findings – The medical consumer is an individualized role that shifts attention away from the quality problem in health care and toward the quality of the person as a medical consumer who is characterized to be optimistic, proactive, rational, responsible, and informed.

Research limitations/implications – As medicine has become a form of mass consumption, the category of medical consumer has elevated the individual in medical decision-making. The shift from patient to medical consumer is an ongoing process that is grounded in a tension between medical control and individual agency, and is exacerbated by the intensity and incomprehensibility of modern medicine.

Practical implications – The proliferation of medical information and personal illness narratives through the Internet, advice books, and self-help groups have advanced lay knowledge about preventive medicine and medical treatment while simultaneously introducing new fears and anxiety about the multitude of options and outcomes.

Originality/value of chapter – This study contributes to our knowledge on medical consumerism and its impact on illness experience and the synthesis of lay and professional knowledge.

Details

Patients, Consumers and Civil Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-215-9

Article
Publication date: 10 March 2014

Maria Knoll and Jenny Bronstein

The study aimed to investigate the information disclosure behavior of women bloggers who suffer from infertility by examining their self-disclosure as it relates to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aimed to investigate the information disclosure behavior of women bloggers who suffer from infertility by examining their self-disclosure as it relates to the anonymity patterns they adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was distributed to approximately 300 authors of infertility blogs, 135 bloggers answered the request to take part in the study. The survey gathered basic demographic and blogging practice data, and measured different elements of the bloggers' discursive and visual anonymity as well as their patters of self-disclosure.

Findings

Findings reveal that the majority of respondents identify themselves on their blogs and only a small percentage decided to be totally anonymous, and about half of the bloggers post actual photos of themselves and their lives. The participants reported a high rate of self-disclosure, revealing sensitive information, letting their defenses down, disclosing highly intimate details about their lives, writing openly about their infertility treatments on their blog. No significant correlation was observed between visual and discursive anonymity and the perceived self-disclosure of participants. Results show that the more anonymous the bloggers are, the more afraid they become that their blog may be read by people they know offline. On the other hand, the more identifiable the bloggers are, the more willingness they show to share the content of their journal with people they know offline. The majority of participants expressed concerns that blogging could negatively impact their lives.

Originality/value

This study explores an alternate explanation through the examination of the bloggers' self-disclosure patterns as they relate to the degree of anonymity adopted.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 66 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

Keywords

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