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Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Nachiketa Tripathi and Manaswita Bharadwaja

The negative links between psychological empowerment (PE) and perceived stress may be arguable when evaluated in Indian work settings characterized by socio-cultural…

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Abstract

Purpose

The negative links between psychological empowerment (PE) and perceived stress may be arguable when evaluated in Indian work settings characterized by socio-cultural values like dependence proneness and high power distance. To explore this possibility, the present study aimed to examine the links between PE at work and perceived stress in the Indian milieu. Potential moderating effects of gender, personality (generalized self-efficacy and Big-5 traits) and power distance on this relationship were also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

An experiment with 2 (high PE/low PE) × 2 (male/female) between-subjects design was used on 120 employees from four commercialized banks. PE was manipulated by presenting a work scenario to each participant, where employees experience either high or low PE. Relevant scales were used to measure perceived stress, personality and power distance.

Findings

PE has a significant negative relationship with perceived stress, thus validating the effectiveness of PE in Indian work settings. Emotional stability and agreeableness are established as significant moderators which enhanced the negative links between PE and perceived stress.

Originality/value

The current research has uniquely contributed to the limited literature regarding the role of personality in empowerment and its outcomes. Furthermore, it has captured the theoretical and practical underpinnings of the PE-perceived stress link in Indian work-context.

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 July 2020

Andrew E.P. Mitchell

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceived stressors and coping behaviours in student nurses on a pre-registration programme of study. Stress in student nurses…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate perceived stressors and coping behaviours in student nurses on a pre-registration programme of study. Stress in student nurses has been identified with decreased emotional well-being and poor academic achievement. The significance of stress and coping behaviours in students during training has implications for education and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The present study recruited 87 pre-registration student nurses in a cross-sectional design. Bivariate and multivariate analyses assessed the differences in field and year of study and the students’ perceived stress and coping behaviours.

Findings

The findings showed that stress is a significant issue in nurse training. Fifty-three per cent of the participants had levels higher than the mean. Interestingly, the present study found that high-perceived stress was associated with avoidance behaviours. The most common type of perceived stress and ranked by highest factor were from written assignments and a lack of professional skills and knowledge. Their peer group and everyday life activities were shown as potential ways of coping with stressors. Thus, it seems reasonable to focus support on decreasing avoidant and enhancing stress-reducing behaviours.

Practical implications

Psychological stress and coping behaviours must be considered together, as perceived stress is bound by the ability to ameliorate stress by managing helpful and unhelpful behaviours.

Originality/value

The findings may suggest that a potential benefit could come from the provision of helpful strategies such as peer group support and reduction of avoidant behaviours. Also, there seems to be a need for greater mental health literacy in dealing with stress during training.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 24 September 2018

Anna Krzeminska, Joel Lim and Charmine E. J. Härtel

Occupational stress occurs in a variety of forms, types, and situations. Arguably, a certain level of stress can encourage productivity, ingenuity, and satisfaction. As…

Abstract

Occupational stress occurs in a variety of forms, types, and situations. Arguably, a certain level of stress can encourage productivity, ingenuity, and satisfaction. As occupational stress escalates, however, people’s capacity to deal with it diminishes, eventually compromising work performance and provoking people to express negative emotions. These negative aspects of stress are buffered to a certain extent by individual differences such as personality as well as external contextual factors such as the working environment. This chapter reports a study applying an affective events theory (AET) as a framework to investigate perceived stress in response to negative events in emergency services’ workplaces and the potential buffering effects of servant leadership, affective team climate, and psychological capital. An experience sampling methodology (ESM) was used to record daily cases of self-reported negative events experienced by participants over the three week data-collection period. A structured survey questionnaire independent of the ESM was also used to collect data from 44 emergency service operation members. The findings indicate that servant leadership behavior, affective team climate, and individual psychological capital all are significantly related to reduced perceived occupational stress in emergency service team members.

Article
Publication date: 28 May 2021

Sima Mirzaei Moghadam, Hassan Mahmoodi, Farzaneh Zaheri and Azad Shokri

The aim of this study is to investigate the gender inequalities in perceived stress and the influencing factors in infertile couples in Iranian society.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to investigate the gender inequalities in perceived stress and the influencing factors in infertile couples in Iranian society.

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study was conducted on infertile couples who were referring to Kurdistan Infertility Diagnosis and Treatment Medical Center in 2019. Demographic and clinical information questionnaire, Newton's Infertility perceived stress questionnaire, Rosenberg's standard self-confidence questionnaire and the multidimensional scale of social support were used. Multiple linear logistic models were also used.

Findings

A total of 560 couples (1,120 people) participated in the study. The average perceived infertility-related stress, self-esteem scores and social support and social-emotional loneliness were 173.95 ± 41.87, 13.99 ± 2.29 and 27.81 ± 7.33, respectively, which were significantly different scores across infertility cause and sex (P < 0.05). Males compared to females had lower perceived infertility-related stress (169.93 ± 42.51 vs 177.97 ± 40.86, P = 0.001) and self-esteem scores (14.33 ± 2.29 vs 13.66 ± 2.24, P < 0.001) and social support and social-emotional loneliness (32.92 ± 9.31 vs 30.94 ± 9.04, P < 0.001). The partners who reported themselves as infertile, compared significantly higher in perceived infertility-related stress than those who reported their spouse being infertile (194.24 ± 35.33 vs 141.90 ± 39.28), lower self-esteem scores (12.77 ± 2.21 vs 13.94 ± 1.56) and social support and social-emotional loneliness score (27.81 ± 7.33 vs 30.11 ± 7.70). Also, after taking potential confounders into account with increase in each score of self-esteem, 12.19 units of stress decreases (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 11.40–12.99) and with increase in each score of social support and social-emotional loneliness, 3.45 units of stress decreases (P < 0.001, 95% CI: 3.28–3.63).

Originality/value

There is perceived stress among infertile couples, and this rate is higher among infertile people and women. Therefore, it seems that specific intervention programs for infertile couples should be implemented based on the results of this study, and their stress levels in a way that self-esteem and support for both partners be increased and the perceived stress among women and infertile individuals be decreased.

Details

International Journal of Human Rights in Healthcare, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4902

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 January 2015

Edward S.-T. Wang and Yeah-Luen Li

The increasing importance of health food sales and the growing number of consumers purchasing health foods necessitates that marketers develop enhanced understanding of…

1088

Abstract

Purpose

The increasing importance of health food sales and the growing number of consumers purchasing health foods necessitates that marketers develop enhanced understanding of health food consumers. The purpose of this paper is to provide a theoretical extension to the health belief model (HBM) that integrates personal stress and environmental cues (visible health problems) with its constructs.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a quantitative face-to-face survey of 384 health food consumers in Taiwan, and structural equation modelling was used to analyse the data.

Findings

The results show that the perceived benefits and barriers of health foods are critical antecedents of continued-consumption intention. Personal stress and visible health problems substantially influence consumers’ perceived susceptibility to and severity of health problems, and perceived susceptibility consequently leads to consumer continued consumption. However, the results indicate an irrelevant relationship between perceived severity of health problems and continued-consumption intentions.

Originality/value

Based on the HBM, the authors integrated perceived stress and visible health problems into the health food consumer research. The findings can improve the understanding of managers in the health food market regarding the role that stress and visibility play in consumer decisions.

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2022

Rajat Kumar Behera, Pradip Kumar Bala, Nripendra P. Rana and Yogesh K. Dwivedi

The Internet is used as a tool to seek health information by individuals. Mental health concerns are the high prevalence of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

The Internet is used as a tool to seek health information by individuals. Mental health concerns are the high prevalence of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and preventive steps are required to curb the illness. Therefore, to gain more insight into health concerns, it is now a common practice to seek health information on the Internet. This study propose an integrated theoretical model to explore the relationship between COVID-19 protocols and perceived online trust with online health information seeking intention (OHISI) and a moderating effect of perceived severity and perceived urgency.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from 325 athletes in the category of individual and team sports through an online survey in a Likert-scale questionnaire. The analysis is performed with a quantitative methodology.

Findings

The study reveals the bright side of online health information (OHI), which brings athletes together and has played out with virtual happy hours, meetings and events. The bright side of OHI reflects social, cultural, technological and economic benefits. An OHI chatbot offers bright personalised side information to the individual seeker, which is more convenient and efficient than human capabilities.

Originality/value

The pivotal contribution is the integrated theoretical framework that is derived from multidisciplinary literature to capture the complexity of OHI. Also, it conceptualises the constructs in the context of OHI and COVID-19.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2015

Narjes Sassi, Assâad El Akremi and Christian Vandenberghe

The purpose of this paper is to examine the links between work stressors, perceived stress, emotional exhaustion, and workplace aggression, using the traits of negative…

1470

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the links between work stressors, perceived stress, emotional exhaustion, and workplace aggression, using the traits of negative affectivity and external locus of control as individual moderators.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a survey questionnaire among 477 blue-collar workers from a Tunisian manufacturing company.

Findings

Results indicate that perceived stress mediates a positive relationship between work stressors (quantitative workload, role ambiguity, and interpersonal conflicts) and emotional exhaustion. Moreover, the relationship between quantitative workload and interpersonal conflicts and perceived stress is stronger among individuals with high levels of negative affectivity. Similarly, the relationship between quantitative workload and perceived stress is stronger at high levels of external locus of control. Finally, emotional exhaustion mediates a positive relationship between perceived stress and interpersonal and organizational aggression.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that Tunisian organizations may reduce perceived stress and aggressive behavior among blue-collar workers through reducing quantitative workload, role ambiguity, and interpersonal conflicts. Moreover, specific training programs, job redesign, and formal mentorship that provide employees with improved social skills can also be recommended as soon as early signs of frustration or intentions to misbehave appear. Finally, leadership development practices may help supervisors better manage workplace stressors and reduce the occurrence of workplace aggression.

Originality/value

The current study is an initial attempt to look at an integrated model of stress and aggression among blue-collar workers in Tunisia. While some of the findings are consistent with the literature, others might reflect the unique aspects of the Tunisian culture.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Bendegul Okumus and Ahmet Bulent Ozturk

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationship between Millennials' perceived stress and their external and emotional eating behaviors. Furthermore, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the relationship between Millennials' perceived stress and their external and emotional eating behaviors. Furthermore, the moderating effect of nutritional knowledge on the relationship between perceived stress and emotional eating and perceived stress and external eating of US Millennials was tested.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 649 Millennials between the ages of 18 and 35 in the United States, and structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to test the study hypotheses.

Findings

This study extends the literature and provides further insights into the relationship between US Millennials' eating behavior and stress factors. Perceived stress positively influenced Millennials' emotional and external eating behavior, and nutritional knowledge significantly moderated the relationships between perceived stress and emotional eating and perceived stress and external eating.

Research limitations/implications

First, data was collected from Millennials living in the United States. Second, not all of the predictors, save one (perceived stress), were selected and hypothesized as predictors of Millennials' eating behavior. The paper provides the essential psychological elements of US Millennials' eating behavior.

Originality/value

If unbalanced eating and obesity are the result of negative psychological factors, the recommended diet models or physical exercise by themselves may be less effective at combating obesity and related health issues. This is because stress was found to be a highly significant reason for unbalanced eating, new and more practical stress coping strategies are needed to moderate unbalanced eating behavior.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 March 2021

Yin Ma and Dawn Bennett

With a focus on Chinese higher education students, the purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between students' perceived employability and their levels of…

1064

Abstract

Purpose

With a focus on Chinese higher education students, the purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between students' perceived employability and their levels of academic engagement and stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The study engaged 1,155 students from three universities in China. Students responded to an online survey, reporting their confidence in relation to their perceived employability, academic engagement and stress in life. The authors employed structural equation modelling to explore students' confidence in each employability attribute and to assess perceived employability relation to academic engagement and perceived stress.

Findings

The results suggest that self-perceptions of employability are positively associated with students' academic engagement and negatively associated with perceived stress. Perceived employability mediated the majority paths.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to examine perceived employability in line with academic engagement or stress and the first study to do so in China.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Gaëtane Caesens, Florence Stinglhamber and Gaylord Luypaert

The purpose of this paper are twofold. First, the authors examined the effects of two types of working hard (i.e. work engagement, workaholism) on employees’ well-being…

4717

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper are twofold. First, the authors examined the effects of two types of working hard (i.e. work engagement, workaholism) on employees’ well-being (i.e. job satisfaction, perceived stress, and sleep problems). Second, the authors tested the extent to which both types of working hard mediate the relationship between three types of work-related social support (i.e. perceived organizational support, perceived supervisor support, and perceived coworker support) and employees’ well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

An online questionnaire was administered to 343 PhD students.

Findings

Results revealed that work engagement mediates the relationships between perceived organizational support and job satisfaction and perceived stress. Perceived organizational support has also a direct positive impact on job satisfaction and a direct negative impact on perceived stress and sleep problems. Furthermore, work engagement mediates the influence of perceived supervisor support on job satisfaction and perceived stress. Finally, workaholism was found to mediate the relationships between perceived coworker support, and job satisfaction, perceived stress, and sleep problems.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that managers should promote practices in order to foster work engagement and prevent workaholism. In line with this, the findings indicated that the most powerful source of support that fosters work engagement is perceived supervisor support. Organizations should, therefore, train their supervisors to be supportive in their role of directing, evaluating and coaching subordinates or encourage supervisors to have regular meetings with their subordinates. Additionally, the results showed that perceived coworker support is the only source of work-related social support that has a negative influence on workaholism. Managers should foster coworker support, for instance by encouraging informal mentoring among employees in order to build a strong social network.

Originality/value

Because scholars argued that each type of work-related social support might have different consequences and might vary in terms of strength of associations with their outcomes, the study aimed to examine the concomitant effects of three forms of work-related social support on two types of working hard which, in turn, influence employees’ well-being.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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