Search results

1 – 10 of 103
Article
Publication date: 1 November 1999

Atefeh Sadri McCampbell, Channarong Jongpipitporn, Imran Umar and Surin Ungaree

Defines and compares the differences in management styles and performance measures in Eastern and Western global business operations. The cultural differences between Thailand and…

2587

Abstract

Defines and compares the differences in management styles and performance measures in Eastern and Western global business operations. The cultural differences between Thailand and the USA specifically, will be analyzed to determine their impact on the selection of a seniority v. merit promotion system. The methodology used was a questionnaire consisting of 12 questions distributed to 50 Thai companies and 50 US companies. The respondents were asked to identify the promotional structure as seniority or merit based, distinguish the benefits, and/or negative impact of the promotional structure within their respective firms, and define the effects of the structure on promotion, benefits, and corporate decision making. A summary of the findings, inclusive of statistical data comparison, is also included. Conclusions and recommendations are provided based upon the data, which suggest that the seniority‐based promotion system should change for Thailand to remain competitive in a hyper‐intensive, dynamic global marketplace.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Shoaib Ali, Imran Yousaf and Zaghum Umar

This study aims to examine the hedge, diversifier and safe-haven properties of bonds against infectious disease-related equity market volatility (IDEMV), like COVID-19.

418

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the hedge, diversifier and safe-haven properties of bonds against infectious disease-related equity market volatility (IDEMV), like COVID-19.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply wavelet coherence methodology on the daily data of IDEMV and bond market (US, UK, Japan, Switzerland, Canada, Australia, Sweden, China and Europe) indices from 1 January 2000 to 14 February 2021.

Findings

The results show no significant co-movement between these bond indices and IDEMV, thus confirming that they serve as a hedge against IDEMV. However, during the turbulent period like COVID-19, the authors find that the US, UK, Japan, Switzerland, Canada, Australia, Sweden, China and European bond markets act as safe-haven against IDEMV, whereas the UK, US, Japan and Canadian bond markets demonstrate an in-phase and positive co-movement with IDEMV during COVID-19, suggesting their role as a diversifier.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings are important for investors and portfolio managers regarding risk management, portfolio diversification and investment strategies.

Originality/value

The authors contribute to the fast growing body of work on the financial impacts of COVID-19 as well as to ongoing consideration of whether a bond is a safe-haven investment.

Details

Review of Behavioral Finance, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1940-5979

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Likely consequences of Pakistan's imminent IMF bailout.

Article
Publication date: 7 May 2019

Dalila Daud

Waqf has the quality of perpetuity so waqf properties cannot be sold, bought or given as a gift to others. Therefore, it is necessary to make sure that the property is fully used…

1191

Abstract

Purpose

Waqf has the quality of perpetuity so waqf properties cannot be sold, bought or given as a gift to others. Therefore, it is necessary to make sure that the property is fully used and properly managed by the Malaysian Islamic councils. To properly manage these properties, it is essential for the councils to have a proper reporting. Unfortunatley, this is not the case in the present situation for waqf. It was found that there is a lack of reporting on waqf matters. The purpose of this paper is to explore how the Islamic governance can contribute to the sufficient and adequate of waqf reporting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper described what is being practised at present for waqf reporting. A series of Islamic governance literature was proposed in reinforcing waqf reporting.

Findings

This paper fulfils a gap in prior research by discussing several systems in Islamic governance to achieve transparency in waqf reporting. The findings of this paper may provide a significant contribution to any organisation that act as a trustee for waqf.

Practical implications

This paper provides an opportunity for further theoretical approach in defining and describing the role of governance in the reinforcement of waqf reporting. The paper has recommended several strategies towards better governance in Islamic council, and these suggestions can be offered to the councils for improvement.

Social implications

This research will be of interest to policy makers, especially Government and State Government. Given the current debate in Malaysia on the most appropriate forms of regulation for the Islamic sector, this study aims to provide valuable insights into the role of Islamic governance in the system of regulation.

Originality/value

This paper examined several governance system in Islamic governance to be applied in any Islamic organisation. This paper specifically deals governance issue that should be practised by present councils to prevent lack in waqf reporting. This system discusses the ways Islamic councils should perform since the system was originally implemented by a previous, distinguished caliph, Umar Al-Khattab.

Details

Journal of Islamic Accounting and Business Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0817

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2023

Maria Babar, Habib Ahmad and Imran Yousaf

This study investigate the return and volatility spillover among agricultural commodities and emerging stock markets during various crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic and the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigate the return and volatility spillover among agricultural commodities and emerging stock markets during various crises, including the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Design/methodology/approach

This return and volatility spillover is estimated using Diebold and Yilmaz (2012, 2014) approach.

Findings

The results reveal the weak connectedness between agricultural commodities and emerging stock markets. Corn and sugar are the highest and lowest transmitters, respectively, whereas soya bean and coffee are the largest and smallest recipients of spillover over time. Most equity indices are the net recipient except for India, China, Indonesia, Argentina and Mexico, during the entire sample period. Most commodities are net transmitters of volatility spillover except coffee and soya bean. At the same time, major equity indices are the net recipient of the volatility spillover except for India, Indonesia, China, Argentina, Malaysia and Korea. In addition, the return and volatility spillover increase during various crises like the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russian-Ukrainian war, but the major increase in spillovers occurs during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Practical implications

The empirical results show a weak relationship between agricultural commodities and emerging stock markets which is helpful for investors and portfolio managers in the construction and reallocation of their portfolios under different periods, most notably under COVID-19 and the Russian-Ukrainian war.

Originality/value

It is an original paper.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Executive summary
Publication date: 11 May 2023

PAKISTAN: Authorities target Imran Khan’s party

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES278975

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

K.B. Sridevi

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management…

1289

Abstract

Purpose

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management education is the really challenging part, and this is where the management educational institutions build their uniqueness. The present management education needs a paradigm shift in order to fulfill the growing futuristic demands of the industry. The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies. The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India to analyze the perception of the management faculty and management students toward filling the quality gaps for a futuristic management education. The study has included 125 management faculties and 1200 management students through simple random sampling, and the data are collected through survey method.

Findings

The independent “t” test has been applied. The management faculties exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as research gaps, online platforms and industry and institution linkages since the mean scores are 4.22, 4.20 and 4.14 respectively. The management students exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as online platforms, updated pedagogies and soft skills development since the respective mean scores are 3.87, 3.85 and 3.82.

Research limitations/implications

The research area chosen for the study is reflecting the scenario of management education in developing countries such as India. The scenario may differ to developed countries.

Practical implications

When the quality of the management education is enriched, it will create global management professionals who will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments.

Social implications

The present study is enriching the existing literature review, by comparing the perception of both the counterparts, the management faculty and students, about the teaching and learning process. Thus, it can be concluded that the outcome of this study is relevant for the management educational institutions, and the need of the hour for the management education is definitely to fill the quality gaps, and all the management educational institutions have to be prepared enough to overcome the gaps with the support of their well-planned strategies. The futuristic demands are ever growing, even then the gap between the present and future expectations of the industry need to be well considered and bridged. As a result of the paradigm shift, the quality of the management education will be enriched, and it will create global management professionals. As a result of this quality-conscious education, a reputed brand image and set of loyal customers may also be developed (Akareem and Hossain, 2016). The learners of quality management education will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments. Further research is needed to measure the post impact of filling the quality gaps in the arena of management education.

Originality/value

The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2023

Ijaz Younis, Imran Yousaf, Waheed Ullah Shah and Cheng Longsheng

The authors examine the volatility connections between the equity markets of China and its trading partners from developed and emerging markets during the various crises episodes…

157

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine the volatility connections between the equity markets of China and its trading partners from developed and emerging markets during the various crises episodes (i.e. the Asian Crisis of 1997, the Global Financial Crisis, the Chinese Market Crash of 2015 and the COVID-19 outbreak).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use the GARCH and Wavelet approaches to estimate causalities and connectedness.

Findings

According to the findings, China and developed equity markets are connected via risk transmission in the long term across various crisis episodes. In contrast, China and emerging equity markets are linked in short and long terms. The authors observe that China leads the stock markets of India, Indonesia and Malaysia at higher frequencies. Even China influences the French, Japanese and American equity markets despite the Chinese crisis. Finally, these causality findings reveal a bi-directional causality among China and its developed trading partners over short- and long-time scales. The connectedness varies across crisis episodes and frequency (short and long run). The study's findings provide helpful information for portfolio hedging, especially during various crises.

Originality/value

The authors examine the volatility connections between the equity markets of China and its trading partners from developed and emerging markets during the various crisis episodes (i.e. the Asian Crisis of 1997, the Global Financial Crisis, the Chinese Market Crash of 2015 and the COVID-19 outbreak). Previously, none of the studies have examined the connectedness between Chinese and its trading partners' equity markets during these all crises.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Expert briefing
Publication date: 30 August 2018

Pakistan's likely need for an IMF bailout.

Article
Publication date: 23 February 2022

Hendy Herijanto

This paper aims to find out the similarities and differences in meaning between the word “al amanah” and trust.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to find out the similarities and differences in meaning between the word “al amanah” and trust.

Design/methodology/approach

As a qualitative research, a content analysis is used in three stages. First, to elaborate the exegesis of the related Qur’anic verses together with the background narration or asbab un-nuzul if any and the Prophetic hadith where the word amanah is and to analyse and conclude its meanings. Second, the word “trust” is analysed based on the discussions in the literature which will lead to its specific meanings. Third, the concluded meanings of amanah and trust are to be compared to find out their similarities and differences.

Findings

Amanah and trust have the similar meanings: safe, confident, ability to fulfil the expectation of the person who trust, having competence or expertise to perform duty, deliver commitments, keep promises, work with a full of responsibility, integrity or obedient to moral principles. Differences: Amanah is not only oriented to humanity and responsibility in human’s relations but also, more importantly, to God Allah the Almighty, obeying His commands to make it as ibadah or acts of worshipping Allah the Almighty for maslahah or welfare for society.

Practical implications

The findings are considered important for companies or organisations. Before doing a commercial transaction or entering a contract or hiring an employee, they must study the quality of the counterparty whether they are capable to do the job as expected or not. In addition, the findings indicate that Islamic teachings concerning muamalat or Islamic rules for social dealings is universal in nature.

Originality/value

Being the first time to compare the word al amanah to trust, the findings point out the important elements to be evaluated when assigning a certain duty to an agent.

Details

International Journal of Ethics and Systems, vol. 38 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9369

Keywords

1 – 10 of 103