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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

K.B. Sridevi

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management education is the really challenging part, and this is where the management educational institutions build their uniqueness. The present management education needs a paradigm shift in order to fulfill the growing futuristic demands of the industry. The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies. The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India to analyze the perception of the management faculty and management students toward filling the quality gaps for a futuristic management education. The study has included 125 management faculties and 1200 management students through simple random sampling, and the data are collected through survey method.

Findings

The independent “t” test has been applied. The management faculties exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as research gaps, online platforms and industry and institution linkages since the mean scores are 4.22, 4.20 and 4.14 respectively. The management students exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as online platforms, updated pedagogies and soft skills development since the respective mean scores are 3.87, 3.85 and 3.82.

Research limitations/implications

The research area chosen for the study is reflecting the scenario of management education in developing countries such as India. The scenario may differ to developed countries.

Practical implications

When the quality of the management education is enriched, it will create global management professionals who will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments.

Social implications

The present study is enriching the existing literature review, by comparing the perception of both the counterparts, the management faculty and students, about the teaching and learning process. Thus, it can be concluded that the outcome of this study is relevant for the management educational institutions, and the need of the hour for the management education is definitely to fill the quality gaps, and all the management educational institutions have to be prepared enough to overcome the gaps with the support of their well-planned strategies. The futuristic demands are ever growing, even then the gap between the present and future expectations of the industry need to be well considered and bridged. As a result of the paradigm shift, the quality of the management education will be enriched, and it will create global management professionals. As a result of this quality-conscious education, a reputed brand image and set of loyal customers may also be developed (Akareem and Hossain, 2016). The learners of quality management education will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments. Further research is needed to measure the post impact of filling the quality gaps in the arena of management education.

Originality/value

The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2021

Kishore Thomas John and K. Shreekrishna Kumar

Kerala is one of India's most advanced states in human development and other social indices. This study aims to look at the management education scenario in Kerala from a…

Abstract

Purpose

Kerala is one of India's most advanced states in human development and other social indices. This study aims to look at the management education scenario in Kerala from a macro-perspective and examines the existing trends, major issues and present challenges facing the sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is driven by previously unexplored secondary data published by India's apex technical education regulator–All India Council for Technical Education (AICTE). Qualitative and quantitative assessments are assimilated from the organization, dissection and categorization of unit-level data.

Findings

Business schools (B-schools) in the state are facing acute distress in enrolments. There are intra-regional variations in institution count and occupancy rates. The vast majority of the institutions have no accreditation at all. The entire sector is facing a protracted decline.

Research limitations/implications

The study has relied primarily on descriptive statistics considering a single discipline within the higher education sector in Kerala. Future studies should look at other disciplines (engineering, medicine) simultaneously. Use of statistical methods like panel data regression would be beneficial to find hidden trends in cross-sectional and longitudinal time-series data.

Practical implications

Management education in Kerala is facing an existential crisis. This has implications for the state's economic development. The paper creates strong imperatives for government policymaking to forestall the complete decline of the sector.

Social implications

A highly literate state with advanced human development indices need not be a suitable location for building a knowledge-based economy. Government policy has strong implications for the development and sustenance of higher education. The relationship between government and business schools are symbiotic.

Originality/value

The paper maps the progression of B-schools from local to global. A typology of privately funded B-schools is proposed. The conceptual framework advanced in this study can contribute to further literature development. The suggested policy initiatives are applicable not only to Kerala but also to other tightly regulated markets.

Details

Rajagiri Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-9968

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Sharon Thabo Mampane

This chapter contextualizes futuristic learning in a distance education (DE) context for empowering and transforming students. Futuristic learning involves a continuous…

Abstract

This chapter contextualizes futuristic learning in a distance education (DE) context for empowering and transforming students. Futuristic learning involves a continuous progress to higher levels of critical and creative thinking in a collaborative environment of academic freedom. Futuristic learning encourages classroom engagement and learning to students to use modern and advanced approaches of teaching and learning. The skills acquired should facilitate students’ intellectual, social, and emotional development. Futuristic pedagogy advocates the acquisition of systematized knowledge and skills and encourages the idea of engaging analytical and practical skills during learning. The chapter describes a practice that provides educational opportunities to a large section of students who study alone most of the time but get the opportunity of learning at organized tutorial sessions. This teaching approach may be the most viable option to mobilize futuristic learning in South Africa. A descriptive research methodology employed literature analysis of documents using data extracted from secondary sources of information, which entailed peer reviewed journal articles and books published between 2000 and 2018. A key finding is that the traditional form of education should pave way for futuristic pedagogy to allow schools to respond to the learning needs of students. The significance of the study is that it will offer opportunities for the change in learning approach to organize how student engagement will be carried out in the future. Informed by this finding futuristic learning should be committed to the provision of quality education to all DE students.

Details

Improving Classroom Engagement and International Development Programs: International Perspectives on Humanizing Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-473-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1976

JAMES F. McNAMARA

Futures research and long‐range planning in an urban school district involve the use of a methodology having no direct answers or precise rules in terms of experimental…

Abstract

Futures research and long‐range planning in an urban school district involve the use of a methodology having no direct answers or precise rules in terms of experimental and design alternatives. While some design options can be found in operations research and management science, futures research projects in education are more likely to follow the directions for policy analysis initially suggested by Yehezkel Dror and re‐examined in Aaron Wildavsky. They note in policy analysis, 1. Much attention would be paid to the political aspects of public decision‐making and public policy‐making (instead of ignoring or condescendingly regarding political aspects) … 2. A broad conception of decision‐making and policy‐making would be involved (instead of viewing all decision‐making as mainly a resources allocation) … 3. A main emphasis would be on creativity and search for new policy alternatives, with explicit attention to encouragement of innovative thinking … 4. There would be extensive reliance on … qualitative methods … 5. There would be much more emphasis on futuristic thinking … 6. The approach would be looser and less rigid, but nevertheless systematic, one which would recognise the complexity of means‐ends interdependence, the multiplicity of relevant criteria of decision, and the partial and tentative nature of every analysis … (Wildavsky, Aaron, “Rescuing Policy Analysis from PPBS” Public Administration Review 29. 1969. pp. 189–202. Wildavsky's reference is to Dror's “Policy Analysts : A New Professional Role in Government Service” Public Administration Review. 27. 1967. pp.200–201). The intent is to describe a single futures research project conducted in a large urban school district staff development program. It is reported here as a means to outline a general approach to policy planning that might be used or adapted by other administrators who share an interest in futures research.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Book part
Publication date: 17 December 2016

Christa Breum Amhøj

This chapter suggests that welfare management is becoming a matter of being able to use the open space in between formal roles, silos and organisations to actualise a not…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter suggests that welfare management is becoming a matter of being able to use the open space in between formal roles, silos and organisations to actualise a not yet possible, qualitatively better welfare here and now. The discourse about the open-ended and futuristic space in between is challenging practices of welfare education. A growing field of studies is criticising the centres of education, learning and research for being a McDonald’s culture, with an overly linear approach, unable to connect passion, sensitivity and intuition with knowledge. This chapter goes further than criticising existing practices. Building on notions of affective studies, the aim is to experiment on how to shift the focus from thinking about open spaces to intensifying thinking-spaces, able to generate the processual relations increasing the opportunity for a qualitative better welfare to occur here and now.

Design/methodology/approach

The object of the chapter is an experiment entitled The Future Public Leadership Education Now. It is based on non-representational studies and designed to operate on the affective registers.

Findings

The chapter offers a theoretical and pragmatic wandering as wondering. It continues and expands the experiment as an ongoing thinking-spaces moving between the known and the unknown. It aims at gently opening the opportunity for a qualitatively better welfare to occur.

Practical implications

Researchers become welfare artists intensifying affective co-motions as ongoing and form-shifting processes.

Details

Developing Public Managers for a Changing World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-080-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Muhammad Naveed Baqir and Yunus Kathawala

Aims to develop a knowledge city model by constructing knowledge homes using futuristic technology building blocks that can help in implementing the concept of virtual Ba…

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2373

Abstract

Aims to develop a knowledge city model by constructing knowledge homes using futuristic technology building blocks that can help in implementing the concept of virtual Ba to share, manage, and create knowledge. A variety of research organizations and forums are researching new technologies for better connectivity, contactivity, and computational power to manage knowledge. In this paper, a knowledge city model has been developed based upon five important technological components leading to knowledge sharing/creation for knowledgeable citizens. The model also sheds light on how it may cater to the educational, socio‐cultural, business and governmental needs of knowledge cities. Amalgamation of different technologies is indispensable to managing the knowledge of a learning organization. This type of technology integration leads to increasing amounts of data, and intensifies the pressure of information overload upon knowledge workers. The growing network usage also upsets network models, putting remarkable pressure on bandwidth requirements and network management. The technologies used to build a knowledge city address these issues by developing a smart knowledge network. This is not an exhaustive review of various technologies used to construct a knowledge city model, but it is a useful resource for knowledge managers, technology managers, and planners who are interested in exploring promising technologies to manage knowledge. This paper combines the latest technologies to build a knowledge home that is aimed towards implementing Ba in a knowledge city. The paper also introduces the concept of virtual Ba by unifying the traditional Ba and knowledge management technologies.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 8 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2010

D. Elangovan, G. Sundararaj, S.R. Devadasan and P. Karuppuswamy

Manufacturing organisations are expected to produce their products with prompt delivery using better supply chain activities. Starting from the procurement of raw…

Abstract

Manufacturing organisations are expected to produce their products with prompt delivery using better supply chain activities. Starting from the procurement of raw materials to the delivery of final products, there are inevitable losses occurring due to major time delays in supply chain activities. Hence it is essential to study, understand and track these major time delays by developing futuristic supply chain risk management strategies. This paper reports a research which was conducted to meet this requirement. During this research, major time delays were investigated by conducting a questionnaire supported interview based survey in 15 manufacturing organisations. On analysing the responses, pilot strategies for achieving loss reduction have been proposed. The paper is concluded by pointed out the necessity for developing dynamic models for achieving loss reduction and continuous improvement.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 6 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2020

M. Jayne Fleener and Susan Barcinas

This study aims to provide insights into ecosystem builder futurists’ work and their orientations toward creating more connected communities of the future.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insights into ecosystem builder futurists’ work and their orientations toward creating more connected communities of the future.

Design/methodology/approach

Anticipation of and relationship with the future are not straightforward. How we approach the future and our relationship with it has underlying ontological and epistemological assumptions (Poli, 2010, 2017). Forecasting (Makridakis et al., 2008), foresight (Bishop and Hines, 2012; Hines and Bishop, 2013; Popper, 2008), futures studies (Bell, 2009; Gidley, 2017) and anticipatory logics (Miller and Poli, 2010; Miller et al., 2017; Nadin, 2010; Poli, 2017) inform this research study of a select group of futurists’ relationships with the future. This research explores ecosystem builder futurists’ work and their orientations toward creating more connected communities of the future. A primary driver of this research aims to understand how futurists with emergentist understandings think about and work with their clients to better understand how to facilitate individual and community transformations through anticipatory future perspectives.

Findings

This qualitative study was designed to explore the why, where and how of the ecosystem builder futurists. The “why” question of their work focused on capacity building, disruption and community for evolving systems revealing an emergentist orientation to the future. The “where” question, focusing on where their passions and ideas for futures work came from, revealed a commitment to forge new territories and support communities through the change process. Finally, the “how” questions revealed using both/and methods of traditional and innovative approaches with a special focus on changing the hearts and minds of those who participated in their community change initiatives.

Research limitations/implications

A total of 15 ecosystem futurists participated in this study. Their perspectives were strongly affiliated and aligned with ecosystem building and communities of the future ideas. The narrow focus, however, is important to represent this particular population of the futurists.

Practical implications

There is a great need for ecosystem futurists who can work with communities for social and community transformations. This paper introduces ecosystem builder futurists as a unique population of futurists with specific drivers for and perspectives of change.

Social implications

Especially in post-normal, mid-pandemic times, there will be more opportunities and need for ecosystem builder futurists to engage groups of individuals in transformative and community building processes. This study focuses on ecosystem futurists and how they work toward fundamental, community change.

Originality/value

Futurists work across many areas and emerging fields. A search of futurist activities reveals some of these areas including Marketing, Team Building, Coaching, Strategic Planning, Partner Management, Marketing Strategy, Ecosystem Building and Sustainable Community Development, to name a few. The purpose of this study is to describe the perspectives and underlying drivers of a particular group of futurists who have been working in large and small communities, organizations, governments and with clients with an underlying focus on creating communities of the future.

Details

foresight, vol. 22 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2019

Shailesh Rastogi, Arpita Sharma and Chetan Padmakar Panse

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of effective teaching–learning (ETL) from students’ perspective in B-schools and build a model for the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the determinants of effective teaching–learning (ETL) from students’ perspective in B-schools and build a model for the satisfaction of students of B-schools from teaching–learning processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs the descriptive research design, and the cross-sectional data are collected through a structured questionnaire. Out of 320, 302 accurately filled questionnaires were used for the empirical analysis. The data are collected from the masters of business management (MBA) students. An exploratory factor analysis is applied to appraise factors appropriate for ETL. A confirmatory factor analysis is used to establish reliability and validity of the identified factors. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to empirically test the proposed model for ETL.

Findings

The major findings of the current study are as follows: this paper identifies extracurricular activities (ECA), conducive environment (CE) and project work and practical exposure (PWPE) as the determinants of ETL in MBA Programs. These determinants have been identified individually; however, collectively authors do not find any other study that discusses them. This paper explores a suitable and apt model of ETL through the identified determinants of ETL (ECA, CE and PWPE). This is also a contribution of the paper, which has not been observed by the authors, in the literature.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the research can be enhanced to the all level of management students and colleges of all sorts can be taken.

Practical implications

Findings of this paper are a long-term plan with a futuristic vision. Determinants affecting ETL will help the administrators and faculty members at the MBA programs to realign their focus for the future.

Originality/value

This study determines three determinants (from the students’ points of view) for the effectiveness of the teaching–learning process in the management (MBA) programs. The determinants in this study are ECA, CE and PWPE. SEM is applied to test the model of ETL and to specify these three determinants (constructs). Decision makers for MBA programs can prudently use the model to bring about transformation in teaching–learning processes in business schools.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 May 2020

Eda Atasoy, Harun Bozna, Abdulvahap Sönmez, Ayşe Aydın Akkurt, Gamze Tuna Büyükköse and Mehmet Fırat

This study aims to investigate the futuristic visions of PhD students at Distance Education department of Anadolu University on the use of learning analytics (LA) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the futuristic visions of PhD students at Distance Education department of Anadolu University on the use of learning analytics (LA) and mobile technologies together.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research study, designed in the single cross-section model, aimed to reveal futuristic visions of PhD students on the use of LA in mobile learning. In this respect, SCAMPER method, which is also known as a focused brainstorming technique, was used to collect data.

Findings

The findings of the study revealed that the use of LA in mobile can solve everyday problems ranging from health to education, enable personalized learning for each learner, offer a new type of evaluation and assessment and allow continuous feedback and feedforwards; yet this situation can also arise some ethical concerns since the big data collected can threaten the learners by interfering with their privacy, reaching their subconscious and manipulating them as well as the whole society by wars, mind games, political games, dictation and loss of humanity.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited with the views of six participants. Also, the sample of the study is homogeneous in terms of their backgrounds – their age range, their departments as PhD students and their fields of expertise.

Practical implications

The positive perceptions of PhD students provide a ground for the active use of LA in mobile. Further, big data collected through LA can help educators and system makers to identify patterns which will enable tailored education for all. Also, use of LA in mobile learning may stimulate the development of a new education system including a new type of evaluation and assessment and continuous feedback and feedforwards.

Originality/value

The widespread use of mobile technologies opens new possibilities for LA in the future. The originality of this research comes from its focus on this critical point.

Details

Asian Association of Open Universities Journal, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1858-3431

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