Search results

1 – 10 of 46
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 September 2020

K.B. Sridevi

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of…

Downloads
767

Abstract

Purpose

Management is a blended discipline with characteristics of both science and art. The component science is to be learnt and art to be practiced. This art component of management education is the really challenging part, and this is where the management educational institutions build their uniqueness. The present management education needs a paradigm shift in order to fulfill the growing futuristic demands of the industry. The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies. The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India.

Design/methodology/approach

The researcher has taken an attempt to do a dyadic study in India to analyze the perception of the management faculty and management students toward filling the quality gaps for a futuristic management education. The study has included 125 management faculties and 1200 management students through simple random sampling, and the data are collected through survey method.

Findings

The independent “t” test has been applied. The management faculties exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as research gaps, online platforms and industry and institution linkages since the mean scores are 4.22, 4.20 and 4.14 respectively. The management students exhibit high degree of acceptance for filling the quality gaps such as online platforms, updated pedagogies and soft skills development since the respective mean scores are 3.87, 3.85 and 3.82.

Research limitations/implications

The research area chosen for the study is reflecting the scenario of management education in developing countries such as India. The scenario may differ to developed countries.

Practical implications

When the quality of the management education is enriched, it will create global management professionals who will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments.

Social implications

The present study is enriching the existing literature review, by comparing the perception of both the counterparts, the management faculty and students, about the teaching and learning process. Thus, it can be concluded that the outcome of this study is relevant for the management educational institutions, and the need of the hour for the management education is definitely to fill the quality gaps, and all the management educational institutions have to be prepared enough to overcome the gaps with the support of their well-planned strategies. The futuristic demands are ever growing, even then the gap between the present and future expectations of the industry need to be well considered and bridged. As a result of the paradigm shift, the quality of the management education will be enriched, and it will create global management professionals. As a result of this quality-conscious education, a reputed brand image and set of loyal customers may also be developed (Akareem and Hossain, 2016). The learners of quality management education will contribute qualitatively to the industries and uplift the overall global economic developments. Further research is needed to measure the post impact of filling the quality gaps in the arena of management education.

Originality/value

The quality gaps identified through review of literature are preach–practice, industry–institution linkages, quality faculty, updated curriculum, soft skills development, research, online platforms and updated pedagogies.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Jose Luis Hervas Oliver and Juan Ignacio Dalmau Porta

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategic framework and tool to measure and value intellectual capital (IC) in regional clusters.

Downloads
2513

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a strategic framework and tool to measure and value intellectual capital (IC) in regional clusters.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical cluster strategic framework is presented and cluster fundamentals are discussed for proper model development. Design methodology was used to construct a model which achieves the aforementioned purpose.

Findings

The paper provides a comprehensive model to describe, map, measure and value IC on clusters and systematically control the IC evolution.

Research limitations

The system provided is not an exhaustive use of all the available measures. A more comprehensive practical application on several clusters would be necessary to validate and readapt the model.

Practical implications

A very useful tool of information and practical assessment for IC is provided to cluster agents and policymakers to establish proper strategic initiatives. New ideas about IC measurement in clusters are provided to academia.

Originality/value

So far, no IC cluster model has been designed. This paper fulfils an IC measurement model to help individuals involved in clusters, such as mangers, policymakers, etc.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 November 2019

Bob Kennedy

The purpose of this paper is to develop a coherent theory and strategy for the achievement of quality outcomes that is meaningful and relevant to people at all levels of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a coherent theory and strategy for the achievement of quality outcomes that is meaningful and relevant to people at all levels of society. These should help the quality professional engage with people at all levels of society in the development of a culture that appreciates quality, systems and excellence. The research draws on the work of the community quality councils movement in the USA and sought to build on this experience in a village in northwest Ireland.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research employing an ethnographic type approach to a four year immersion period in a small industrious community. Its inductive nature and naturalist mode of enquiry did not lend itself to either the generation or analysis of quantitative data. Nevertheless it yielded many rich complex pictures or patterns of qualitative information requiring long periods of reflection to decipher the sense and meaning in them.

Findings

The findings can be encapsulated in one sentence “To achieve quality outcomes we must practise excellence and maintain systems that are fit for purpose”. This requires a radical reworking of Deming’s system of profound knowledge (SoPK) to make it relevant to the human complex adaptive systems that permeate the twenty-first century. These operate as autonomous service providers in a rapidly changing environment.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of this research have transferability to all sectors in society pursuing purposeful activity. It is relevant at individual, interest-group, industry, institution and community level. It should make the development of a “quality culture” more attainable at all levels.

Practical implications

Provides quality professionals with new terminology and imagery to engage with, analyse and help autonomous human activity systems in the twenty-first century. It moves Deming’s SoPK to a new level more suited to human systems.

Social implications

By explaining quality, excellence and systems in easily understood and accepted terms the Grange Excellence Model allows every individual, interest-group, industry and institution share the same language and images as they pursue quality outcomes. This unified approach could transform communities and society in general.

Originality/value

The research generates a seismic shift in the appreciation of quality, excellence and systems making them relevant and meaningful to people at all levels of society. This provides quality professionals with a methodology, images and vocabulary that will facilitate productive engagement with purposeful systems at all levels of complexity.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Cory Searcy, Stanislav Karapetrovic and Daryl McCartney

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyze a case study on the design of a system of sustainable development indicators for an electric utility.

Downloads
3070

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present and analyze a case study on the design of a system of sustainable development indicators for an electric utility.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study is based on collaboration with an electric utility and consultation with external experts. A six‐step process was used to create the indicators: conduct a needs assessment; conduct process planning; develop a draft set of indicators; test and adjust the indicators; implement the indicators; and review and improve the indicators.

Findings

The case study demonstrates how existing projects impact the process of developing indicators. It highlights that any system of indicators must be linked to the business planning process. It shows how this may be accomplished through a design based on a hierarchical approach that also illustrates linkages between the indicators and incorporates existing measures.

Research limitations/implications

The first three steps of the indicator design process have been completed. Research on the remaining three steps is ongoing.

Practical implications

Applying the principles of sustainable development has become an essential part of doing business. This paper illustrates how sustainable development indicators may be developed and integrated with existing business infrastructure at an electric utility.

Originality/value

Even in companies with strong corporate responsibility programs, a key challenge is to construct meaningful indicators that are integrated with mainstream business systems. Although it is recognized that each situation is unique, this paper provides insight into the development of indicators within existing corporate infrastructures.

Details

Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2020

Shijiao Chen, Malcolm J. Wright, Hongzhi Gao, Huan Liu and Damien Mather

Industry-wide crises involving consumer products place consumers at risk. Consumers rely on institutions that constrain corporate practice and control product quality to…

Abstract

Purpose

Industry-wide crises involving consumer products place consumers at risk. Consumers rely on institutions that constrain corporate practice and control product quality to reduce risk. As institutions vary by country, country-of-origin (COO) acts as a salient cue for consumers to identify institutional quality and thus evaluate risk when making purchase decisions. However, in the era of globalisation, identification of institutional quality becomes complex as global value chains involve different countries such as brand origin (BO) and country-of-manufacture (COM). Therefore, this research investigates how BO and COM individually and jointly affect consumers' institutional perceptions and subsequent purchase decision-making in the presence of systemic risk.

Design/methodology/approach

This research includes three studies (n = 764) employing surveys and choice modelling experiments with samples from China and the USA.

Findings

The results show that BO and COM relate to different institutional perceptions. BO evokes perceptions of legitimacy and the regulatory environment, while COM evokes perceptions of the normative and the regulatory environment. The combination of BO and COM determines how institutional quality is communicated and further affects consumers' legitimacy perceptions, preferences and willingness to pay a price premium.

Originality/value

This research contributes to understanding the effect of BO and COM in the context of complex value chains from an institutional perspective. It also provides implications for leveraging complex COO cues with BO and COM information to improve consumers' institutional perceptions.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Executive summary
Publication date: 21 December 2016

US/RUSSIA: Added sanctions against Moscow may not last

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 December 2019

M.F.F. Fasna and Sachie Gunatilake

Despite the pressures around the world to retrofit existing buildings to have higher energy performance, still the level of adoption and implementation of Building Energy…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the pressures around the world to retrofit existing buildings to have higher energy performance, still the level of adoption and implementation of Building Energy Efficiency Retrofits (BEER) appear comparatively low. The purpose of this paper is to explore the barriers that affect the successful implementation of BEER in actual project level executions and identify strategies to overcome such barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, two case studies were conducted in selected hotel buildings to explore the barriers that hamper the adoption and implementation of BEER in the local context and in turn identify the strategies to overcome them. Altogether 11 semi-structured interviews were conducted with respondents involved in different phases of these BEER projects. The data were analysed using code-based content analysis.

Findings

Altogether 38 barriers were identified under the three main project phases. Furthermore, the study revealed 77 strategies to overcome the identified barriers, classified as individual, organisational and national level strategies.

Originality/value

This paper has made a unique contribution to the field by identifying the barriers in each phase of BEER projects and proposing strategies to be taken at different levels to overcome them. The findings of this study will provide a basis for setting up country-wide and organisation-wide strategies for successfully improving the energy efficiency of existing hotel buildings.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

Thomas J. Fitzgerald

Although marketing functions are basically the same for services and products, there is a significant difference in the organization and implementation for exploiting a…

Abstract

Although marketing functions are basically the same for services and products, there is a significant difference in the organization and implementation for exploiting a competitive advantage in business‐to‐business services.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Gahana Gopal C., Yogesh B. Patil, Shibin K.T. and Anand Prakash

The purpose of this paper is to formulate frameworks for the drivers and barriers of integrated sustainable solid waste management (ISSWM) with reference to conditions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to formulate frameworks for the drivers and barriers of integrated sustainable solid waste management (ISSWM) with reference to conditions prevailing in India.

Design/methodology/approach

A multi-phased approach was adopted in this paper to come up with the conceptual framework of the drivers and barriers of ISSWM. In the first phase, drivers and barriers of ISSWM were identified based on a systematic literature review process. In the second phase, 25 experts having 15 plus years of experience in the field of sustainable development and environmental management were consulted to get their opinion. Validation and understanding of the interrelationship among the selected drivers and barriers were done based on the insights from expert interviews. And in the final phase, structural self-interaction matrix and transitive links are defined based on the expert opinion to come up with the theoretical frameworks of drivers and barriers of ISSWM.

Findings

Findings reveal the importance to have a system view point approach by giving equal importance to social, environmental and economic pillars of sustainability along with the technology component to effectively and sustainably manage the solid waste disposal. Institutional effectiveness and the robust policy and frameworks are the two variables found to have the highest driving power. Poor social values and ethics, huge population and illiteracy are the three most critical barriers faced by developing nations in achieving the sustainability practices in the solid waste management. The proposed frameworks of drivers and barriers of ISSWM will definitely help policy makers to effectively manage the sustainable waste management practices for developing economies by focusing on the key variables listed out.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations is in the use of very limited sample size in the study. Another limitation is that total interpretive structural modeling fails to come up with the relative weightings of drivers and barriers used in the study. These limitations can be overcome by extending the research by using a semi-structured questionnaire survey with higher sample size for the empirical validation of the model.

Practical implications

This research will help to clearly understand the framework of drivers and barriers of variables and their hierarchical level based on the driving power and dependence. Since such articles focusing on the conceptual frameworks of drivers and barriers of ISSWM are found to be very scant, this paper will equally help academicians and waste management professionals to understand the concepts deeply, by getting answers to the fundamental questions of “what,” “why” and “how.” Developed framework of drivers explicitly shows the need to attain financial stability through the commercialization of the waste management initiatives, which will help to reduce burden on various governmental institutions. Commercialization opportunities will also help to have more successful start-up ventures in solid waste management domain that can provide improved employment opportunities and hygiene environment in the developing nations like India.

Originality/value

Based on the authors’ best knowledge, there is hardly any article that explicitly explains the conceptual frameworks of the drivers and barriers of ISSWM by considering the conditions prevailing in developing countries like India. And thus, this can be considered as one of the unique research attempts to build a clear conceptual framework of ISSWM. The study contributes significantly to the existing literature body by clearly interpreting the interrelationships and the driving power and dependence of variables of ISSWM.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

Keywords

1 – 10 of 46