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1 – 10 of over 2000
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Mohammadkarim Bahadori, Ehsan Teymourzadeh, Ramin Ravangard and Mohammad Saadati

The purpose of this paper is to determine accreditation effects on Iranian military hospital health service quality through nurses’ viewpoints.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine accreditation effects on Iranian military hospital health service quality through nurses’ viewpoints.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study. Sampling drew from a hospital nurse census (n=160). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze participant demographics and nurses’ views. Linear regression analysis determined the independent variables’ overall effect on the accreditation quality results dimension (dependent variable).

Findings

From the nurses’ viewpoints, accreditation effects on services quality mean score was 3.60±0.61. Linear regression analysis showed that leadership and quality management were identified as the most important accreditation quality predictors. The R2 value (0.698) showed that nearly 70 percent of the dependent variable changes were affected by the independent variables.

Practical implications

This study gives hospital managers a deeper insight into accreditation and its effects on military hospital service quality. Military hospitals benefit from military organization such as hierarchy and command chain, so managers should employ these characteristics to adopt appropriate policies to promote human resource management as a competitive advantage. Furthermore, results will guide public and private hospital managers on how to manage organizational variables that benefit from accreditation.

Originality/value

Accreditation was introduced as a hospital quality improvement program. However, implementing accreditation programs should be cost-effective. Hospital managers and employees should feel that accreditation can improve service quality. Nurses had positive viewpoints about accreditation and its effects on military hospital service quality.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Mazyar Karamali, Mohammadkarim Bahadori, Ramin Ravangard and Maryam Yaghoubi

Hospital accreditation has been adopted internationally as a way and solution for healthcare quality improvement in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to review and…

Abstract

Purpose

Hospital accreditation has been adopted internationally as a way and solution for healthcare quality improvement in hospitals. The purpose of this study was to review and knowledge mapping of bibliographic data about “Hospital Accreditation” and assess the current quantitative trends.

Design/methodology/approach

Scientometric methods and knowledge visualization using the coword analysis techniques conducted in three steps based on the data related to the field of hospital accreditation from 1975 to 2018 obtained from the MEDLINE database. Bibliographic data for titles, abstracts and keywords articles were saved in CSV format and MEDLINE templates by applying filters. Data extracted were exported into an Excel spreadsheet and were preprocessed. The authors applied the text mining and visualization using VOSviewer software.

Findings

Hospital accreditation studies have been increased rapidly over the past 30 years. 6,661 documents in the field of hospital accreditation had been published from 1975 to 2018. Hospitals or organizations active in the field of hospital accreditation were in the United States, Italy and Canada. The 10 most productive authors identified in the area of hospital accreditation with a higher influence were identified. “The United States”, “accreditation”, “Joint commission on accreditation” and “quality assurance, healthcare” had, respectively, the highest frequency. The cluster analysis identified and categorized them into four major clusters. Hospital accreditation field had a close relationship with the quality improvement, patient safety, risk and standards.

Originality/value

Hospital accreditation had focused on the scopes of implementation of accreditation programs, adherence to JCI standards, and focus on safety and quality improvement. Future studies are recommended to be conducted on design interventions and paying attention to all dimensions of hospital accreditation.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 33 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Ahmed Al Kuwaiti and Fahd A. Al Muhanna

This paper aims to examine the challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals in attaining accreditation for their institutions.

1182

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals in attaining accreditation for their institutions.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a study of current literature on health-care leadership, hospital accreditation and quality of patient care and identifies the challenges facing health-care leadership in attaining accreditation for teaching hospitals.

Findings

Based on a review and analysis of literature, infrastructure, finance, legal support, workforce recruitment and training, documentation and technology are identified as challenges faced by health-care leadership in teaching hospitals. The key challenges facing health-care leadership with respect to medical education and clinical research are found to be integration of education into hospital operations, compliance with all regulatory and professional requirements and adequacy of resources in executing research programs.

Originality/value

This study draws the attention of health-care leadership in teaching hospitals on the challenges they face in obtaining accreditation for their institutions so that they may develop appropriate strategies to overcome them.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2016

Sara Melo

Research on accreditation has mostly focused on assessing its impact using large scale quantitative studies, yet little is known on how quality is improved in practice…

4703

Abstract

Purpose

Research on accreditation has mostly focused on assessing its impact using large scale quantitative studies, yet little is known on how quality is improved in practice through an accreditation process. Using a case study of an acute teaching hospital in Portugal, the purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamics through which accreditation can lead to an improvement in the quality of healthcare services provided.

Design/methodology/approach

Data for the case study was collected through 46 in-depth semi-structured interviews with 49 clinical and non-clinical members of staff. Data were analyzed using a framework thematic analysis.

Findings

Interviewees felt that hospital accreditation contributed to the improvement of healthcare quality in general, and more specifically to patient safety, as it fostered staff reflection, a higher standardization of practices, and a greater focus on quality improvement. However, findings also suggest that the positive impact of accreditation resulted from the approach the hospital adopted in its implementation as well as the fact that several of the procedures and practices required by accreditation were already in place at the hospital, albeit often in an informal way.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one hospital. The design of an accreditation implementation plan tailored to the hospital’s context can significantly contribute to positive outcomes in terms of quality and patient safety improvements.

Originality/value

This study provides a better understanding of how accreditation can contribute to healthcare quality improvement. It offers important lessons on the factors and processes that potentiate quality improvements through accreditation.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Salma Khan, Taraneh Yousefinezhadi and Reece Hinchcliff

There is conflicting evidence concerning the impact of hospital accreditation programmes, including across the Middle East Region, where such programmes have been most…

Abstract

Purpose

There is conflicting evidence concerning the impact of hospital accreditation programmes, including across the Middle East Region, where such programmes have been most recently implemented in Iran, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. This paper maps available evidence regarding the impact of hospital accreditation in these three countries and draws attention to knowledge gaps for consideration.

Design/methodology/approach

This scoping review was conducted in 2020, using the Arksey and O'Malley framework. Five research databases were searched, along with five government and accreditation agency websites. Searches were complemented by citation chaining. English and Arabic publications evaluating hospital accreditation in the selected countries were included. Commentaries and articles not based on primary data collection and reviews of existing registry data were excluded. There were no exclusions based on study design or methods. A descriptive numerical summary and thematic analysis were used to synthesise the literature.

Findings

studies were included. The majority (n = 35) were published since 2014 and conducted in Saudi Arabia (n = 16). Four themes emerged: organisational impacts, patient safety, quality of care, and patient satisfaction and experience. The literature generally highlights positive impacts of accreditation, but most studies were based solely on health professionals' subjective perceptions. “Organisational impacts” had the largest, and strongest body of supporting evidence, while “patient safety” had the least and most variable evidence.

Originality/value

Opportunities to strengthen the design and evaluation of hospital accreditation programmes in the selected countries are highlighted. Additional experimental, mixed-method research is recommended to strengthen the evidence base and inform practical enhancements to hospital accreditation programmes in the region.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 27 December 2021

Geraldine Robbins, Breda Sweeney and Miguel Vega

This study examines how an externally imposed management control system (MCS) – hospital accreditation – influences the salience of organisational tensions and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how an externally imposed management control system (MCS) – hospital accreditation – influences the salience of organisational tensions and consequently attitudes of management towards the system.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected using a case study of a large public hospital in Spain. In-depth interviews were conducted with 27 senior and middle managers across different functions. Relying on the organisational dualities classification in the literature, tensions are unpacked and analysed.

Findings

Evidence is presented of how hospital accreditation increases the salience of organisational tensions arising from exposition of the organisational dualities of learning, performing, organising and belonging. Salient tensions were evident in the ambivalent attitudes of management towards the hospital accreditation system.

Practical implications

The role of mandatory external control systems in exposing ambivalence and tensions will be of interest to organisational managers.

Originality/value

The study extends the management control literature by identifying an active role for an external MCS (accreditation) in increasing the salience of organisational tensions and triggering ambivalence. Contrary to the prior literature, the embedding of both poles of an organisational duality into the MCS is not a necessary precondition for increased tension salience. The range of attitudes towards MCSs beyond those specified in the previous literature (positive/negative/neutral) is extended to include ambivalence.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2004

Marie‐Pascale Pomey, André‐Pierre Contandriopoulos, Patrice François and Dominique Bertrand

Examines the dynamics of change that operated following preparations for accreditation. The study was conducted from May 1995 to October 2001 in a university hospital

2786

Abstract

Examines the dynamics of change that operated following preparations for accreditation. The study was conducted from May 1995 to October 2001 in a university hospital center in France after the introduction in 1996 of mandatory accreditation. An embedded explanatory case study sought to explore the organizational changes: a theoretical framework for analyzing change was developed; semi‐structured interviews, focus groups, and questionnaires addressed to the hospital's professionals were used and documents were collected; and qualitative and quantitative analyses were carried out. Professionals from clinical and medico‐technical departments participated most. Preparations for accreditation provided an opportunity to reflect non‐hierarchically on the treatment of patients and on the hospital's operational modalities by creating a locus for exchanges and collegial decision making. These preparations also led to giving greater consideration to results of exit surveys and to committing procedures to paper, and were a key opportunity for introducing a continuous quality program.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Ahmet Yildiz and Sidika Kaya

– This article aims to investigate perceptions of Turkish nurses on the impact of accreditation on quality of care and the effect of accreditation on quality results.

1291

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to investigate perceptions of Turkish nurses on the impact of accreditation on quality of care and the effect of accreditation on quality results.

Design/methodology/approach

This study was performed as a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based survey on 258 nurses who started working in the hospital before it was accredited and continued to work during and after accrediation and who therefore knew both the hospital's pre-accrediation and post-accreditation periods. In this study, descriptive statistical analyses (means and standard deviations) were carried out to explore the views of the participants on “quality results,” “benefits of accreditation” and “participation of employees.” “Quality results” was considered to be the dependent variable, while “benefits of accreditation” and “participation of employees” were accepted as the independent variables. The relationship between the dependent variable and the independent variables was tested using Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis. External patient satisfaction data collected by the quality department of the hospital before and after accreditation were also investigated.

Findings

It was found that nurses had generally high scores for the items concerning the benefits of accreditation. There was a statistically significant positive correlation between the dependent variable (quality results) and the independent variables (benefits of accreditation and participation of employees). Regression analysis indicated that R2=0.461 and the extent to which the independent variables explained the dependent variable was 46.1 per cent, which is a high rate. Patient satisfaction scores increased after accreditation.

Practical implications

Our study suggest that providing support for nurses, especially nurses with administrative responsibilities and incorporating employees into the process are important for exercising quality standards.

Originality/value

Hospital accreditation has a positive impact on quality results especially on quality of care provided to patients and patient satisfaction. Study findings could guide policy makers and hospital managers in Turkey and in other countries who are preparing or implementing accreditation.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Rita L. Ratcliffe

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the first new hospital accreditation option in over 40 years, and the only accreditation scheme for US hospitals which is…

1384

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce the first new hospital accreditation option in over 40 years, and the only accreditation scheme for US hospitals which is ISO‐based. It seeks to explore factors prompting design of a fundamentally new approach, patient and provider experiences thus far, outlook for adoption of this alternative, and potential for improving delivery of health services in US hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach takes the form of a review of available materials, industry and popular press accounts, federal documents; interviews with hospital executives and managers and with prime developers of the new accreditation process; access to personal prior industry research and experiences.

Findings

Frustrated by an established accreditation process seen as wasteful and ancillary to standard operations, administrators and clinicians developed a new approach designed to use accreditation as a strategic business tool to reinforce clinical and business process integration, efficiencies, innovation, accountability, and sustained improvement in day‐to‐day hospital operations. The accreditation process has been approved for hospitals providing care to US Medicare beneficiaries.

Originality/value

Pressures to reform the financing and delivery of health services in the USA – and to address concerns of escalating costs, decreased access, limited improvements in patient safety, poor care coordination, and an absence of accountability – intensify. The introduction of a novel hospital accreditation option into an arena long dominated by a single powerful accreditor provides opportunity for disruptive innovation. The rate of adoption of this new approach and its impact on existing challenges will be of interest to multiple stakeholders.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Mohammad Saadati, Mohammadkarim Bahadori, Ehsan Teymourzadeh, Ramin Ravangard, Khalil Alimohammadzadeh and Seyed Mojtaba Hosseini

Accreditation helps to ensure safe and high-quality services in hospitals. Different occupational groups have various hospital accreditation experiences. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Accreditation helps to ensure safe and high-quality services in hospitals. Different occupational groups have various hospital accreditation experiences. The purpose of this paper is to investigate nurses’ accreditation experience and its effects on Iranian teaching hospital service quality.

Design/methodology/approach

This was a qualitative study involving a phenomenological approach to studying nurses’ hospital accreditation experience and understanding the effects on Iranian teaching hospital service quality. Data were collected using two focus groups in which nurses were selected using purposive sampling. Transcripts were analyzed using content analysis.

Findings

Nurses’ experiences showed that hospital administrators and nurses had greater role in implementing accreditation than other occupational groups. Accreditation improved patient-centeredness, patient safety, logistics and managerial processes and decision making. However, a weak incentive system, extra documentation and work stress were negative experiences.

Practical implications

Nurse experience, as the most important care team member, reveals accreditation’s strengths and weaknesses and its effects on service quality.

Originality/value

The author used a phenomenology approach to measure accreditation effects on service quality – a valuable tool for understanding a phenomenon among those that experience hospital accreditation processes.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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