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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2019

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Ricardo Giglio and Desirée H. van Dun

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of Industry 4.0 technologies on the relationship between lean production (LP) and operational performance…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the moderating role of Industry 4.0 technologies on the relationship between lean production (LP) and operational performance improvement within Brazil, a developing economy context.

Design/methodology/approach

One representative from each of the 147 studied manufacturing companies filled in a survey on three internally related lean practice bundles and two Industry 4.0 technology bundles, with safety, delivery, quality, productivity and inventory as performance indicators. As this study was grounded on the contingency theory, multivariate data analyses were performed, controlling for four contingencies.

Findings

Industry 4.0 moderates the effect of LP practices on operational performance improvement, but in different directions. Process-related technologies negatively moderate the effect of low setup practices on performance, whereas product/service-related technologies positively moderate the effect of flow practices on performance.

Originality/value

With the advent of Industry 4.0, companies have been channelling their efforts to achieve superior performance by advancing levels of automation and interconnectivity. Eventually, widespread and proven manufacturing approaches, like LP, will integrate such technologies which may, in turn, impair or favour operational performance. Contrary to previous studies, the contingencies appeared to have a less extensive effect. The authors point to various options for further study across different socio-economic contexts. This study evidenced that purely technological adoption will not lead to distinguished results. LP practices help in the installation of organisational habits and mindsets that favour systemic process improvements, supporting the design and control of manufacturers’ operations management towards the fourth industrial revolution era.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 39 no. 6/7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2021

Satie Ledoux Takeda-Berger, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Carlos Manuel Taboada Rodriguez, Enzo Morosini Frazzon, Tamie Takeda Yokoyama and Marco Aurélio de Oliveira

The purpose of this paper is to classify the main barriers related to the implementation of lean supply chain management (LSCM) and prioritize its main practices. A case…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to classify the main barriers related to the implementation of lean supply chain management (LSCM) and prioritize its main practices. A case study approach was conducted to obtain values for the intensity of the relationship between LSCM practices and barriers to mitigate or even anticipate difficulties in its implementation.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study in a company in southern Brazil that is in lean implementation is used for conducting this research. The methodology was structured in three steps, namely, classification of the main barriers through risk analysis, selection of LSCM practices appropriate to the company context and ranking and prioritization of the main practices of LSCM related to the barriers to lean implementation.

Findings

As a result, with the combination of two approaches, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and analytical hierarchical process (AHP), it was possible to obtain values for the intensity of the relationship between LSCM practices and barriers. From the 12 barriers, 5 reached a high-risk degree that can be mitigated, and among the 18 practices found, 7 have the potential to be implemented.

Originality/value

This research allows direct efforts to continuously improve the supply chain to mitigate or even anticipate difficulties in its implementation. The proposed methodology, combining FMEA and AHP is easy to apply and understand, allowing managers and professionals to replicate it in the context of their supply chain and verify results similar and comparable to those obtained here.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2020

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Rogério Miorando, Diego Fettermann and Diego Tlapa Mendoza

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students'…

Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies the association between two methods for teaching lean manufacturing (LM): problem-based learning (PBL) and classroom lectures, and students' learning styles of a postgraduate course.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from graduate students LM courses that present different teaching approaches. Thus, students' learning preferences were gathered through the application of the Index of Learning Style questionnaire, and their performance assessed after each course.

Findings

Results indicate that learning styles are indeed associated with LM teaching approaches, and comprehending interaction effects between learning style dimensions is essential for properly adapting the teaching method. However, these interactions have different extensions.

Originality/value

Although teaching LM has significantly evolved over the past decades, the single application of traditional teaching methods jeopardizes learning effectiveness of graduate students because of the practical nature of LM. This study provides evidence to better understand the effect of complementary teaching methods and their relationship with students' preferences, empirically examining that there is not one best approach for understanding LM.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 62 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 March 2018

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Diego de Castro Fettermann, Alejandro Frank and Giuliano Marodin

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the association between leadership styles (task or relation orientation) and lean manufacturing (LM) implementation changes…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how the association between leadership styles (task or relation orientation) and lean manufacturing (LM) implementation changes due to two contextual variables, team size and the leader’s age.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out a survey with 225 leaders from different Brazilian companies that are implementing LM. Research constructs were validated through rigorous procedures using confirmatory factor analysis. Hypotheses were tested using ordinary linear least squares regression.

Findings

The results suggest that larger teams and more senior managers were negatively associated with LM implementation. Task-orientation style makes leaders more likely to achieve higher levels of LM than relation-orientation style leaders. Finally, the influence of relation-oriented leaders on LM implementation is contingent upon the size of the team.

Research limitations/implications

Regarding study’s limitations, sample size and respondents’ location restrict results to this contextual condition, indicating that increasing the sample would help provide wider and more generalizable results. It is also worth noting that results are based on respondents’ (leaders) perspective. Hence, future studies may collect data from multiple perspectives, such as leaders and their followers, in order to compare results so as to verify the convergence or divergence among different respondents.

Practical implications

The results suggest that leaders should have different behaviors according to the context in which they are inserted. Therefore, such behavioral prescriptions are useful for managers since they are pressured to achieve high operational performance in short time periods and with few resources. Further, companies undergoing lean implementation may also be able to stimulate proper leadership behaviors and promote development programs accordingly, which is extremely relevant since behavioral changes usually take time.

Originality/value

The evolutionary process for achieving a successful lean enterprise requires different leadership styles according to the context in which leaders are inserted. This research provides arguments to help better understand the recommended leadership behaviors for lean implementation, complementing existing roadmaps by considering the proper leadership style as a contingency issue during lean implementation. Moreover, identifying the effect of contextual variables helps specify the contexts in which lean practices are more likely to be implemented.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Daniel Luiz de Mattos Nascimento, Osvaldo Luiz Goncalvez Quelhas, Rodrigo Goyannes Gusmão Caiado, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes and Luis Rocha-Lona

This paper aims to explore synergies between lean production (LP) and six sigma principles to propose a lean six sigma (LSS) framework for continuous and incremental…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore synergies between lean production (LP) and six sigma principles to propose a lean six sigma (LSS) framework for continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector. The Three-dimensional LSS framework seeks to provide various combinations about the integration between LP principles, DMAIC (define–measure–analyse–improve–control) cycle and plan-do-check-act (PDCA) cycle to support operations management needs.

Design/methodology/approach

The research method is composed of two main steps: diagnosis of current problems and proposition of a conceptual framework that qualitatively integrates synergistic aspects of LP and six sigma and analysis of the application of the construct through semi-structured interviews with leaders from oil and gas companies to assess and validate the proposed framework.

Findings

As a result, a conceptual framework of LSS is developed contemplating the integration of LP and six sigma and providing a systemic and holistic approach to problem-solving through continuous and incremental improvement in the oil and gas sector.

Originality/value

This research is different from previous studies because it integrates LP principles, DMAIC and PDCA cycles into a unique framework that fulfils a specific need of oil and gas sector. It presents a customized LSS framework that guides wastes and cost reduction while enhancing quality and reducing process variability to elevate efficiency in operations management of this sector. This is an original research that presents new and original scientific findings.

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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Article
Publication date: 13 June 2016

Giuliano Almeida Marodin, Alejandro Germán Frank, Guilherme Luz Tortorella and Tarcisio Abreu Saurin

This paper aims to understand the patterns of lean production implementation, and the relationship between three context factors (i.e. firm size, positions within the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to understand the patterns of lean production implementation, and the relationship between three context factors (i.e. firm size, positions within the supply chain and time length of the lean initiative) and the adoption of lean production practices in firms of the automotive supply chain in Brazil.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected data from 65 companies of the automotive supply chain in Brazil. For data analysis, first a cluster analysis was performed to identify common characteristics in the companies’ context factors when considering patterns of lean implementation. Then, multivariate analysis of variance was used to investigate the differences between the context factors and the degree of use of lean practices.

Findings

High lean adopters had better performance than low lean adopters in terms of lead time, inventory and turnover. Firms at the first and second tier of the automotive supply chain were “leaner” than firms at the third tier. Large-sized firms were more likely to have a higher degree of use of lean practices than medium and smaller ones. Some, but not all, lean practices followed these patterns. Results also showed that some lean practices were most commonly adopted at the beginning of the lean journey, whereas others took more time to mature.

Originality/value

This paper demonstrated how lean practices were implemented at different positions within the supply chain, and the patterns of implementation often followed. It also considers lean in the context of developing countries such as Brazil.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2017

Giuliano Almeida Marodin, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Alejandro Germán Frank and Moacir Godinho Filho

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between the implementation of Lean shop floor (LSF) practices and Lean supply chain management, and their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between the implementation of Lean shop floor (LSF) practices and Lean supply chain management, and their effect on quality and inventory turnover.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based research method was conducted and data were collected from 110 plants located in Brazil. The research constructs were validated through rigorous procedures (unidimensionality and discriminant validity and reliability) through confirmatory factor analysis and two hypotheses were tested using ordinary least square regression.

Findings

The results indicate that: Lean supplier relationship positively moderates the effect of LSF practices on inventory turnover; Lean customer relationship negatively moderates the effect of LSF practices on inventory turnover; and Lean supplier relationship positively moderates the effect of LSF practices on quality.

Originality/value

From a theoretical perspective, the results of this study provide evidences supporting the importance of understanding the systemic relationships between Lean implementation at the shop floor and the firm’s relationships with supply chain partners, that was not tested before. As managerial implications, the results suggest that managers should take a decision to foster a Lean supply chain management depending on which performance metrics they need to improve: quality or inventory turnover.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Ricardo Giglio and Jorge Limon-Romero

The purpose of this paper aims at investigating which lean supply chain management (LSCM) practices efficiently improve the supply chain performance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper aims at investigating which lean supply chain management (LSCM) practices efficiently improve the supply chain performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve that, a cross-sectional survey was carried out with 113 manufacturing companies undergoing a lean implementation. The proposed method combines complementary methods of multivariate data analysis in order to determine which bundles of LSCM practices more efficiently entail improvements on supply chain performance.

Findings

The findings justify why some LSCM initiatives may find larger barriers than others, compromising their success due to misguided implementation efforts according to the desired performance improvement.

Originality/value

The empirical examination on the efficiency of LSCM practices with regards to a certain set of performance indicators provides guidelines with respect to LSCM implementation depending on which performance indicators are envisioned for improvement.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2020

Tarcisio Abreu Saurin, Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Marlon Soliman and Jose Arturo Garza-Reyes

This paper presents an exploratory investigation of myths on lean production (LP), by identifying, dispelling and assessing their pervasiveness.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents an exploratory investigation of myths on lean production (LP), by identifying, dispelling and assessing their pervasiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A list of myths was proposed mostly based on seminal LP texts and our rich experience from researching, teaching and consulting in lean journeys. Complexity thinking was adopted as a lens for dispelling the myths, as it challenged generalizations implied in myths. An investigation of the pervasiveness of the myths was also conducted, based on a survey with 120 academics and practitioners.

Findings

Ten myths were identified and dispelled. Survey's results indicated that belief in lean myths was more common among less experienced practitioners (<10 years), while experience was not a relevant factor for academics.

Research limitations/implications

The lean myths partly reflect the experience of the authors. Furthermore, a larger sample size is necessary for a full analysis of pervasiveness.

Practical implications

The lean myths might be underlying barriers to LP implementation (e.g. lack of knowledge of managers and workers), and they might be proactively accounted for in lean training and education programs.

Originality/value

This is the first work to explicitly frame a set of lean myths.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Guilherme Luz Tortorella, Rogério Miorando and Diego Tlapa

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of a set of contextual variables on the implementation of lean supply chain (LSC) practices. The authors…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to empirically investigate the effect of a set of contextual variables on the implementation of lean supply chain (LSC) practices. The authors do that by investigating one main research question: “how do the contextual variables (i.e. plant size, supply chain level, level of onshore suppliers and age of the LM initiative) influence on the degree of adoption of LSC practices?”

Design/methodology/approach

To this end, the authors collected data from 115 companies from different sectors located in Southern Brazil. Data collected was analyzed by means of multivariate techniques. The authors tested if the frequency of observations for each contextual variable was associated to the implementation levels of the LSC practices.

Findings

The evidences suggest that supply chain context significantly impacts the likelihood of implementing LSC practices. In particular, the influence of tier level, plant size and larger experience in implementing LM seems to be substantial across a wide mix of practices. On the other hand, results indicate that contexts in which companies are still beginners at the lean journey and their level of onshore suppliers appear to be less pervasive than previous empirical researches imply.

Originality/value

The implementation of LSC practices entails a different business model, in which improved profits arise from the cooperation rather than bargaining or imposing power over supply chain partners. However, not all organizations should implement the same set of practices, since the adoption of any specific management practice depends upon a set of contextual variables. The understanding of the relationship between the level of adoption of LSC practices and the contextual variables helps to anticipate occasional difficulties and sets the proper expectations along the implementation.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

Keywords

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